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  1. Torakaka is offline
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    Do you eat breakfast?

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    Posted On:
    4/21/2010 4:37pm

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     Style: Kitty Pow Pow!!!

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Yeah I've been having my students work some of the clinch techniques, particularly the throws from this video, and while I have a hard time pulling off some of the throws live they've had some success themselves. It's also been helpful in giving me ideas on how to break down clinching techniques that I already know when teaching them.
    Ranked #9 internationally at 118lbs by WIKBA http://www.womenkickboxing.com/wikba...rch%202009.htm
  2. Khun Kao is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/22/2010 1:37pm


     Style: MuayThai

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    ^excellent point regarding how the breaking down of the moves on the video helps you explain other clinching techniques to your students...

    It's been awhile since I've watched the DVD, but as I recall for some of those variations Malaipet teaches that I can't quite pull off HIS way, I've found that using different footwork angles solves the issue. In some of those throws Malaipet demonstrates, he steps between his opponents legs and uses a leg to "block" his opponents leg, hindering their mobility or ability to adjust their feet to prevent the throw. What I've found is what works better for me is that I step to the outside of the leg, as if I'm walking past my opponent.

    Even though I'm stepping around the outside, I still keep my hips GLUED to my opponents hips! I step past them, then pivot to initiate the throw more so than pull them. Basically, I've never been known for my upper body strength. I feel my leg power has always been disproportionately stronger than my upper body, so there are a lot of moves where I have to maximize momentum and levergage by use of body position and angles.

    Wish I had the DVD with me right now so I could pull up a distinct example of what I'm talking about....
  3. Sang is offline
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    Posted On:
    4/22/2010 6:26pm


     Style: MMA, Yoga

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    A lot of it is up on youtube if you'd like to link those and comment. I get what you guys are saying about there being a lot of commonality between clinch techniques, the footwork and leverage is practically identical depending on which way you want them to go, just the grip points change. I think if someone had broken down a few techniques slowly like this to me originally i would have understood some of the more advanced techniques i've been shown since.

    Chief example of a slight but equally valid technical difference for me is in one of his counters to the knee where he pulls the opponent onto the leg thats kneeing while effectively jamming the other leg with his own knee. This has been my go to knee defense for the last year but I've always used a boot-to-boot sweep on the supporting leg since my long lanky legs can do this easily.

    Something I would have liked explained in this dvd though is why the Thai's choose to go for grips on the arms the majority of the time instead of the head. I've been watching a lot of lumpinee/channel 7 stadium MT lately and while you do see these techniques, a lot of the time the clinch will never get to the classic one in, one out position. You can obviously use a hold on the arm instead of the head, but what techniques are available from here and what do you have to look out for?
    "Boxing is the art of hitting an opponent from the furthest distance away, exposing the least amount of your body while getting into position to punch with maximum leverage and not getting hit."
    Kenny Weldon
  4. Neo Sigma is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/22/2010 8:50pm


     Style: Muay Thai

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Sang View Post

    Something I would have liked explained in this dvd though is why the Thai's choose to go for grips on the arms the majority of the time instead of the head. I've been watching a lot of lumpinee/channel 7 stadium MT lately and while you do see these techniques, a lot of the time the clinch will never get to the classic one in, one out position. You can obviously use a hold on the arm instead of the head, but what techniques are available from here and what do you have to look out for?
    Just bought the DVD, so it's not here yet. But if I had to guess? I'd say it's to stop the possibility of getting elbowed.
  5. Torakaka is offline
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    Posted On:
    4/23/2010 12:38am

    supporting member
     Style: Kitty Pow Pow!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sang View Post

    Something I would have liked explained in this dvd though is why the Thai's choose to go for grips on the arms the majority of the time instead of the head. I've been watching a lot of lumpinee/channel 7 stadium MT lately and while you do see these techniques, a lot of the time the clinch will never get to the classic one in, one out position. You can obviously use a hold on the arm instead of the head, but what techniques are available from here and what do you have to look out for?
    Pulling off a full head/neck clinch on someone that has solid clinch skills (which obviously the Thai do) is waaay way more difficult than simply manipulating the crook of the elbow and the armpit as control points. While the head/neck grip gives you the most control, you can take advantage of grips on the crook of the arm to land shots and off balance your opponent on the way in. Pulling on the arm opens the side of the body for clean knee strikes. Also utilizing this range puts you in a good spot to land elbows.
    Ranked #9 internationally at 118lbs by WIKBA http://www.womenkickboxing.com/wikba...rch%202009.htm
  6. Sang is offline
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    Posted On:
    4/23/2010 6:26am


     Style: MMA, Yoga

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Thanks, that makes sense. I've always felt a bit confused being told to go for head control in class and then watching a full card of Thai's just use arm and underpit control.
    "Boxing is the art of hitting an opponent from the furthest distance away, exposing the least amount of your body while getting into position to punch with maximum leverage and not getting hit."
    Kenny Weldon
  7. PointyShinyBurn is offline
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    Posted On:
    4/23/2010 7:27am

    Join us... or die
     Style: BJJ

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    How much is the stuff on the DVD applicable to MMA, in people's opinion?
  8. Khun Kao is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/23/2010 12:02pm


     Style: MuayThai

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by KidSpatula View Post
    Pulling off a full head/neck clinch on someone that has solid clinch skills (which obviously the Thai do) is waaay way more difficult than simply manipulating the crook of the elbow and the armpit as control points. While the head/neck grip gives you the most control, you can take advantage of grips on the crook of the arm to land shots and off balance your opponent on the way in. Pulling on the arm opens the side of the body for clean knee strikes. Also utilizing this range puts you in a good spot to land elbows.
    ^SPOT ON!

    I have made a running joke with my students about Joe Rogan's exclamations during the UFC "[insert figher name] has such an awesome Muay Thai clinch!!!" when all the guy is doing is the "double-neck tie".

    The Thai's consider the double-neck tie to be elemantary as far as clinch skills go. What I like to demonstrate for my students is how when I have a double neck tie on someone, I essentially only have one solid attacking technique... straight knee strikes!

    However, when I switch to the neck and bicep control (inside or outside), suddenly I have a lot of options: knees, elbows, AND throws/dumps!

    I also like to point out that while the double neck tie is a powerful position, its relatively easy to counter if you know what you're doing. A double neck tie can swiftly turn into that fighter being dumped on his ass with a knee or soccer kick to the head on his way down.....
  9. Khun Kao is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/23/2010 12:02pm


     Style: MuayThai

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by PointyShinyBurn View Post
    How much is the stuff on the DVD applicable to MMA, in people's opinion?
    Part of the DVD is devoted to Muay Thai clinching for MMA.
  10. Khun Kao is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/23/2010 12:06pm


     Style: MuayThai

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    One of the ones that Malaipet demonstrates that I like to use is where someone attempts the "skipping side knee". I pull them towards their opposite side (away from the knee) and throw a lifting knee up into their hamstring. Its awesome watching them go airborne!
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