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View Poll Results: Which of the following is most damaging to Martial Arts?

Voters
1180. You may not vote on this poll
  • Mc Dojos

    413 35.00%
  • Charlatans / Bullshido Artists

    387 32.80%
  • Bruce Lee

    31 2.63%
  • MMA Events

    41 3.47%
  • Mysticism

    180 15.25%
  • Technology (internet, games etc)

    28 2.37%
  • The Karate Kid

    50 4.24%
  • All other MA films

    40 3.39%
  • MA-based childrens' toys

    10 0.85%
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  1. Wounded Ronin is offline
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    Posted On:
    8/25/2004 9:03am

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     Style: German longsword, .45 ACP

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I don't think Bruce Lee was that bad for martial arts. If both Bruce Lee and The Karate Kid are on the list, voting for The Karate Kid first is a no-brainer. At least in Bruce Lee movies Lee violently kicks ass. The Karate Kid was all about how kata will save your scrawny helpless ass.

    Also, Bruce Lee recognized the importance of things like conditioning and sparring, which put him ahead of many of the martial arts stylists of his day.
    “nobody shoots anybody in the face unless you’re a hit man or a video gamer.” - Jack Thompson
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  2. Wounded Ronin is offline
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    Posted On:
    8/25/2004 9:14am

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     Style: German longsword, .45 ACP

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Originally posted by Beneath Contempt
    I think you're wrong on so many counts.

    First - entertainment is entertainment. If you're saying Charlie's Angels made you feel ill because of the MA, do you also think that people are similarly deceived by all media portrayals of all things?

    I think so. People who don't know anything about guns tend to form their opinons on guns based on movies. One woman I was talking to was pretty surprised when I told her how getting hit with a 9mm round somewhere in the body dosen't instantly make you drop dead like it usually does in the movies.

    Before I actually went and practiced with firearms I remember I had some misconceptions as well. For example, when I was a kid, thanks to Doom and action movies, I didn't realize that you had to reload the internal magazine in a pump action shotgun eventually. I just assumed that somehow the action of pumping reloaded the weapon.

    I think that The Karate Kid, in the same way, really influenced the opinion of the American public towards martial arts among members of the public who didn't know anything about fighting in the first place.
    “nobody shoots anybody in the face unless you’re a hit man or a video gamer.” - Jack Thompson
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Th...%28attorney%29
  3. jaychiu is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/25/2004 11:08am

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    All these things listed are damaging but, ultimately, the most damaging thing is the fact that individuals are allowing themselves to be duped.

    You watch a movie and see Bruce Lee beat up tons of people without a scratch, the Karate Kid beat up the bullies and gain respect, Steven Seagal disarm knife attacks with his bare hands, little asian guys flying and jumping around...and PEOPLE BELIEVE it's real and can actually happen. You forget it's a movie and think "If I learn these secret techniques I can beat up the bullies that picked on me in school!" HELLO! IT'S A MOVIE!!! I've seen boards where they discuss the killing move in the end of KILL BILL 2 like it's a real technique! Ugh.

    So someone decides that I'll cash in on this. So they open up a McDojo saying "Yes, I have the secrets where you can not fight but still beat people up!" It was past down to me from my secret master which he got from his secret master. AND PEOPLE BELIEVE. They still do. Oom Yung Do is still around, Ashida Kim has his following...why? Cause PEOPLE WANT TO BELIEVE.

    Mysticism? Not the problem. FANATICS are the problem. People BELIEVING blindly in it is the problem when logic and reason say otherwise.

    And it's these individuals, these people who believe, who keep the cycle going - who open up new schools and repeat the process.
  4. pst is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/25/2004 11:48am


     Style: WC, etc.

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I agree jaychiu. People want skill without having to earn it and that is where McDojo students come from.
  5. knight_errant is offline
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    Posted On:
    8/25/2004 12:07pm


     Style: MMA

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    1) In the UFC at least there's a WWE-like atmosphere, with rap and metal music as a soundtrack, and fighter rivalries playing a factor in the coverage.
    2) Despite the myths of TMA, it is true that techniques that work in sport aren't always effective (or, the most effective) on t3h str33t.
    3) The MMA approach to the martial arts is almost totally aphilosophical, yet mystical aesthetics are embraced when it's convenient.
    Um, I guess you're entitled to your opinion, but I don't see a problem with any of that. Why wouldn't you want to make the atmosphere of a fighting competition modern and vibrant?
    While there are sport techniques that won't work on t3h thtw33t, they are definetly in the minority. plus, the general 'sport' attitude is a good thing as for some reason it encourages higher levels of conditioning etc.
    And I don't see any reason to go adding philosophy to something- in any case, I think ther IS philosophy- the same philosophy that applies to any sporting event. What you have described is a situation where philosophy is not forced or preached, but will be adopted where useful. I don't see a problem with this.
    The only problem I can really see with MMA events is the vast wasteland of arseholes who, for the most part, don't actually do MMA, but still nutride it.
  6. jaychiu is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/25/2004 12:31pm

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    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    2) Despite the myths of TMA, it is true that techniques that work in sport aren't always effective (or, the most effective) on t3h str33t.
    Can you name some? I mean techniques that will work against a trained, seasoned, fit, ready to do battle opponent but aren't effective (or the most effective) on th3 str33t.

    Please don't kept the cycle of BS going.
  7. Lone Swordsman is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/25/2004 12:36pm


     Style: Muay Thai

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Originally posted by knight_errant
    Um, I guess you're entitled to your opinion, but I don't see a problem with any of that. Why wouldn't you want to make the atmosphere of a fighting competition modern and vibrant?
    Because full-contact fighting is dangerous business, so a certain amount of professionalism and respect is called for. Which isn't to say it's not present; it's just that the trendy music and visuals of the UFC are a little too reminiscient of the WWE's schlock.

    While there are sport techniques that won't work on t3h thtw33t, they are definetly in the minority. plus, the general 'sport' attitude is a good thing as for some reason it encourages higher levels of conditioning etc.
    I agree, but there is this perception that MMA is the only real test of technique.

    And I don't see any reason to go adding philosophy to something- in any case, I think ther IS philosophy- the same philosophy that applies to any sporting event. What you have described is a situation where philosophy is not forced or preached, but will be adopted where useful. I don't see a problem with this.
    My problem is the hypocrisy of rejecting of fixed, ancient philosophies while embracing their imagery (Bushido, "neo-samurai," etc.).

    The only problem I can really see with MMA events is the vast wasteland of arseholes who, for the most part, don't actually do MMA, but still nutride it.
    That would have to be the worst, yes.
  8. inde is offline
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    Posted On:
    8/25/2004 12:38pm

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     Style: kung fu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Despite the myths of TMA, it is true that techniques that work in sport aren't always effective (or, the most effective) on t3h str33t.
    Seems like this should be the other way around. Anything you use in sport should tranlate to a street fight.
  9. Lone Swordsman is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/25/2004 12:42pm


     Style: Muay Thai

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Originally posted by jaychiu
    Can you name some? I mean techniques that will work against a trained, seasoned, fit, ready to do battle opponent but aren't effective (or the most effective) on th3 str33t.

    Please don't kept the cycle of BS going.
    MMA omits things like strikes to the neck or groin, and certain submissions which could be considered too risky. That makes perfect sense for sport, but you need to be as fast and forceful as possible outside the ring (or octagon).
  10. jaychiu is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/25/2004 12:46pm

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    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Originally posted by Lone Swordsman
    MMA omits things like strikes to the neck or groin, and certain submissions which could be considered too risky. That makes perfect sense for sport, but you need to be as fast and forceful as possible outside the ring (or octagon).
    Yes but that isn't what you said. You said that there are techniques that work in MMA that aren't as effective in the street.

    Now your own to the "too deadly" technique arguement. :rolleyes:
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