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  1. Truculent Sheep is offline

    KEIN HAAR APPROVED!

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    Posted On:
    6/18/2011 8:15pm


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Firstly, the arm guards are made by Leon Paul.

    @ Judoka_Uk

    I'd say eye contact is pretty universal in any working martial arts system. Also, Saviolo's approach requires keeping a constant eye on the other man's hand and foot movements, so letting your guard down is, by definition, frowned upon.
  2. DdlR is offline
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    Posted On:
    6/18/2011 8:34pm

    supporting member
     Style: Bartitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Truculent Sheep View Post
    Firstly, the arm guards are made by Leon Paul.
    http://www.leonpaul.com/acatalog/Qui...es_Sleeve.html

    Are they off-white versions of these?
  3. Dak is offline

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    Posted On:
    6/18/2011 8:51pm


     Style: Boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by DdlR View Post
    Similar intention and basic design, but the arm guards in the video clip look much thicker and they're covered with a quilted material. Maybe standard epee arm protectors customized for training with heavier weapons?
    I suppose. I'm sure the quilted variety is equally as attainable. My coach has a thick black quilted one he uses for drills.

    edit: found the quilted sleeve on fencing.net
    http://shop.fencing.net/product_p/afg-71024.htm

    doubledit: the leon paul one looks much nicer.
  4. Truculent Sheep is offline

    KEIN HAAR APPROVED!

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    Posted On:
    6/19/2011 4:40am


     Style: BJJ

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by DdlR View Post
    Are they off-white versions of these?
    Yes, they are. Sadly, they also cost a veritable bomb - and a lot of WMA outfits insist on Leon Paul.
  5. Mordschlag is offline

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    Posted On:
    6/19/2011 12:33pm


     Style: ARMA, Antagonistics

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Got two questions for you Truculent Sheep.

    I. What led to the development of this unarmed method? Did you see a present need to develop an apparently idiosyncratic unarmed system? Understand that I'm not saying this in any negative way, rather just out of curiosity. I say this because it seems like you've made a sort of fencing-with-the-hands, rather than any kind of historical wrestling usually used for unarmed fighting.

    II. Why bother at all with those arm guards? They seem unnecessary, bulky, and expensive. So what made you want to go with them?

    Props for the walking stick stuff. I love seeing people apply fencing methods to sticks.
  6. Truculent Sheep is offline

    KEIN HAAR APPROVED!

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    Posted On:
    6/19/2011 2:39pm


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Mordschlag View Post
    Got two questions for you Truculent Sheep.

    I. What led to the development of this unarmed method? Did you see a present need to develop an apparently idiosyncratic unarmed system? Understand that I'm not saying this in any negative way, rather just out of curiosity. I say this because it seems like you've made a sort of fencing-with-the-hands, rather than any kind of historical wrestling usually used for unarmed fighting.
    I think there's a recurring theme in renaissance/early modern Italian fighting techniques of the same basic principles applying to all kinds of melee combat, from unarmed to polearms. Fiore dei Liberi's works are another example of this.

    Also, it makes sense to start with unarmed and then gradually work your way up through the arsenal once you've learned how to drill or semi-spar in the least damaging way possible. That might be a more modern approach, though I'd speculate that the original masters may have done it that way too (or with a similar gradual incrementation of intensity in any case).

    Quote Originally Posted by Mordschlag View Post
    II. Why bother at all with those arm guards? They seem unnecessary, bulky, and expensive. So what made you want to go with them?
    If you notice in the video, they're sparring with blunted metal weapons that do hurt a fair bit if you're hit by one. They're also wearing heavy fencing coach vests for that reason. The more full-on 'plays' also require fencing masks.

    As an aside, I will need at least a year's training before I can even get to that point, should I wish to continue.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mordschlag View Post
    Props for the walking stick stuff. I love seeing people apply fencing methods to sticks.
    Yes, that's quite a practical application - if only carrying a stick or cane hadn't gone out of fashion. The chav-battering applications would be many and varied!
  7. SBG-ape is offline

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    Posted On:
    6/19/2011 8:53pm


     Style: Jiu-jitsu & HEMA

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Truculent Sheep View Post
    * The teaching is based on drills, working up to 'free play' which stops short of being full-on sparring.
    “Drills” can mean a great deal of things, so I’d be curious for some clarification describing what in particular constitutes a drill for your group.

    As an example:

    I train at Straight Blast Gym where the curriculum is centered on the use of live drills. Live drills being defined as isolations of range, position or techniques that are performed against a resisting opponent & include unpredictable timing & movement. In some schools & systems the word “drill” is used to describe compliant or predictable repetitions of movements such as in Judo uchikomi, kung fu sticky hands games or the lock flows practiced by some jiu-jitsu/submission wrestling schools. Even solo movement exercises, whether improvised like shadow boxing or scripted as in the case of solo kata exercises, are sometimes called drills. However, in the vocabulary that I’m most personally familiar with, any training activity that lacks the unpredictable movement & timing of a resisting opponent would not be qualified as a drill. Instead such activities would be described as technique introduction, or technique review, or sport/activity specific exercises, or else by the rather disparaging term “dead drill”.

    The word drills has therefore been stretched to such an extent that its breadth contains any formalized or repeatable exercise that is deemed of value by either the practitioner or the instructor. To say that your curriculum uses drills really states no more than that there is a curriculum & that it is not comprised exclusively of sparring. Any specific definition of what constitutes a drill tends to be specific to the group or style that originated the definition.

    So, what exactly is the definition of drill used by your group? Can you offer some examples of drills that are used in your club?
    Last edited by SBG-ape; 6/19/2011 8:56pm at .
  8. Truculent Sheep is offline

    KEIN HAAR APPROVED!

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    Posted On:
    6/20/2011 2:46am


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by SBG-ape
    Drills can mean a great deal of things, so I'd be curious for some clarification describing what in particular constitutes a drill for your group.
    A drill is a repeated set of movements where one partner attacks the other. We take turns to be attacker and defender until we're either told to move on to another partner or until someone makes a mistake. In the case of the latter, we start again and try to iron out the problem, which usually involves footwork going wrong or poor coordination.

    The aim is to get as close to a 'textbook' example of the technique or pattern as possible, in order to develop muscle memory and train our bodies to move differently (it's all in the heels) but also learning to improvise (in terms of the attack or counter attack) and also how to adjust to opponents of varying height and shapes.
  9. lklawson is offline

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    Posted On:
    6/20/2011 9:13am


     Style: Bowie

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Truculent Sheep View Post
    Yes, that's quite a practical application - if only carrying a stick or cane hadn't gone out of fashion. The chav-battering applications would be many and varied!
    I carry a Gentleman's Walkingstick every day, "in fashion" or no. Never had a lick of problem from doing so. Ever.

    Carry your cane. No one cares.

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
  10. Truculent Sheep is offline

    KEIN HAAR APPROVED!

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    Posted On:
    6/20/2011 9:58am


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Sadly, the police in the UK don't see it that way:

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/panorama/hi/fr...00/8130986.stm

    ...Protesters complained they were harassed by constant searches and had personal property seized, including crayons, children's chalk, an ironing board, tent pegs and bike locks...

    ...Protester Shirley Pearce, a retired schoolteacher who had recently undergone knee replacement surgery, had her walking stick seized.

    "The police presence was actually far more than I expected, I was quite outraged," she tells Panorama.


    Obviously, you're legal if you're carrying a stick for any reason other than to use it as a weapon, but that defence very much depends on the eye of the beholder/rozzer, who may be out for an easy collar. If it can be seen as an 'offensive weapon', they will try to prosecute you.

    This doesn't stop criminals carrying illegal weapons, though.
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