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  1. SonofSpiridonov is offline

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    Posted On:
    2/09/2010 9:10am


     Style: Hybrid Martial Arts

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Strifes View Post
    That seems highly unlikely.
    Yeah, a friend of mine has CP and is Wheelchair bound. I guess he also has some motorskill problems but he has a MONSTER physique! Everyday he gets out of the chair and spends at least 20 minutes doing chrunches, push-ups and other exercises for the upper body and arms. He has competed and won gold in wheelchair racing, so building strenght when you have cerbral palsy isnt really an issue. I could see how motorskill problems would complicate your balance-breaking game though.
  2. Robstafarian is offline
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    Posted On:
    2/09/2010 1:44pm


     Style: None

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Strifes View Post
    That seems highly unlikely.
    Quote Originally Posted by SonofSpiridonov View Post
    Yeah, a friend of mine has CP and is Wheelchair bound. I guess he also has some motorskill problems but he has a MONSTER physique! Everyday he gets out of the chair and spends at least 20 minutes doing chrunches, push-ups and other exercises for the upper body and arms. He has competed and won gold in wheelchair racing, so building strenght when you have cerbral palsy isnt really an issue. I could see how motorskill problems would complicate your balance-breaking game though.
    Folks, you need to realize that there's more than one kind of cerebral palsy. I, for instance, have spastic diplegia and have very little in common with the people who have thus far been described in anecdotes. For more information, see: Cerebral Palsy Classification

    I don't want to start a massive derail about the nature of disability, but it seems like society in general has a twisted perspective on disabled people (that's not to say that most "first world" countries aren't significantly more progressive than they once were). If John Doe is a monster wrestler (strong, well balanced, conditioned like a Sterling engine) who's blind and Joe Schmo is an amazing athlete (1,000 each push ups, sit ups, pull ups, and dips in an hour) who can't move his legs, they each have (at least):
    • the genetic predisposition to become that physically fit
    • a body that does what it is told to do
    • the ability to understand, encode, and recall instructions

    Any given disabled person might lack one or more of those attributes. John Doe isn't so much an example of what a disabled person can do with courage, inspiration, etc. so much as he is an athlete who can't see. Similarly, Joe Schmo isn't so much typical of a paraplegic as he is an athlete who can't move his legs.

    This might not be news to any of you, but I do think it's important that the OP realizes how deeply personal the subject of disability can be. Generalizations are to be avoided.

    For every Kyle Maynard, there's someone who's completely fucked and wishes Kyle would shut the **** up.
    Quote Originally Posted by Snake Plissken View Post
    cuz FastPass on Indiana Jones was like being a ghetto rock star.
    Quote Originally Posted by Kiko
    But graffiti isn't a bowl of fruit...
    Quote Originally Posted by Robstafarian View Post
    Merely insulting you is not an ad hominem fallacy: them calling you an idiot would be ad hominem if they said "You are an idiot, therefore your argument is invalid."

    What is instead happening is thus:
    1. Your argument is bullshit.
    2. You keep repeating, and expanding upon, your argument.
    3. Therefore, you are an idiot.

    That isn't an ad hominem fallacy; that's inductive reasoning.
  3. piglet is offline
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    Posted On:
    2/09/2010 2:36pm


     Style: Rising Phoenix Boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I have epilepsy. Complex partial seizures, not the full grand mal that most people think of. I currently average 5-7 seizures a week, but mostly late in the evening. (I'm on new meds to try to bring this to zero.) I've never had one while training, and it doesn't impact many of my physical activities except for the ongoing fatigue. I am still figuring out how much to tell people when, since I don't want to be treated differently (on the mat or anywhere else) but I also want for the people around me to be aware and know what to do in case I have one.
  4. Jadonblade is offline
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    Posted On:
    3/05/2010 3:49pm

    supporting member
     Style: San Da, Judo, BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Some really good stuff. For those that have posted about their own experiences, thank you very much for sharing. I certainly take the point of disability being a very personnel thing.

    Im an outdoor instructer and often work with those with learning or physical disabilities and am virtually suprised in one way or another every session. A current peeve of mine is other instructers I work with who positively discriminate in that they make things to easy. Which I feel takes away their victory and sense of achievement should they succeed. Obviously the goal has to be obtainable but that can be quite hard to judge.
    Check out my blog!:

    http://jadonbjj.blogspot.com/
  5. 100xobm is offline
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    Posted On:
    3/05/2010 3:58pm


     Style: BJJ, formerly Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by piglet View Post
    I have epilepsy. Complex partial seizures, not the full grand mal that most people think of. I currently average 5-7 seizures a week, but mostly late in the evening. (I'm on new meds to try to bring this to zero.) I've never had one while training, and it doesn't impact many of my physical activities except for the ongoing fatigue. I am still figuring out how much to tell people when, since I don't want to be treated differently (on the mat or anywhere else) but I also want for the people around me to be aware and know what to do in case I have one.

    Does this mean you are allowed to drive? Or is it a non issue?
  6. kikoolol is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/05/2010 4:21pm


     Style: BJJ, Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Jadonblade View Post
    Some really good stuff. For those that have posted about their own experiences, thank you very much for sharing. I certainly take the point of disability being a very personnel thing.

    Im an outdoor instructer and often work with those with learning or physical disabilities and am virtually suprised in one way or another every session. A current peeve of mine is other instructers I work with who positively discriminate in that they make things to easy. Which I feel takes away their victory and sense of achievement should they succeed. Obviously the goal has to be obtainable but that can be quite hard to judge.
    I completely agree.

    Due to my disability, I receive special support in college. I am exempted from teamwork projects (well, in theory I can do a reduced workload project alone, but I always opt to just do the whole thing alone), and general class interactions. I also have the permission to do oral presentations alone, in front of the teacher only, which I do routinely use, although my goal this semester is to not use it. I also have a right to do my exams in an empty, quiet room, and to dispose of more time, but I'm comfortable doing my exams with everyone else and I don't need more time, so I choose to not take use of these special considerations.

    Now why am I saying this? Because these special considerations actually foil my development. Lemme explain.

    For autistic people, social behavior is mostly conscious. Normal people can process non-visual cues like facial expressions more readily than autistic people can. We have to use much actual brainpower to process intonations, facial expressions, whatever gesticulations the speaker chooses to make, and so on. We also have to mend to language difficulties and try to detect sarcasm, jokes, puns, idioms, process them, and apply the understanding, all of this manually and at once.

    The experience is quite tiring for us, but it is not impossible to learn. I can seem pretty normal in the right context, I just get mentally tired quickly from social stuff.

    Now, social stuff is mostly dodgeable. I get my mom to speak in my stead when doing something where speaking is needed, like buying something. I avoid people as much as possible, and I'm not especially loquacious. However, teamwork is, well, was not. When I was in high school, teachers would partner me, and it was either suck it up or fail. Teamwork allowed me to make my talents shine, such as rote memory, logical thought and critical sense and expose them. I actually had quite a few friends in high school because people knew me through the teamwork I had no choice to do with them, and they saw that the shy, aloof person they think they knew was not really so shy or aloof when he wanted. I was literally on good terms with everyone, because I was fighting my difficulties, and they appreciated my quirks. High school isn't so cruel if you accept to play the game.

    In college? I have no friends. I'm not even going to whine because it is entirely my fault. I doubt most people even know how my voice sounds like. The point of my post is, they made it too easy for me to do just what I liked and was good in, and gave me a means to avoid doing what I hated. I was foolish enough to take the opportunity and lost a chance to force myself to continue to learn the social game. I think you are absolutely right. Treat them like normal people within reason. Give them their chance to shine.
  7. marcusdbrutus is offline
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    Posted On:
    3/05/2010 5:32pm


     Style: MT, Judo & BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I’m gonna dispel a few myths, a few rumors. First off, the retardeds don’t rule the night. They don’t rule it – nobody does. And they don’t run in packs. And while they may not be as strong as apes, don’t lock eyes with ‘em, don’t do it. Puts ‘em on edge. They might go into berserker mode, come at you like a whirling dervish, all fists and elbows. You might be screaming, ‘No, no, no,’ – all they hear is, ‘Who wants cake? Who wants cake? Who wants cake?’ Let me tell you something: They all do. They all want cake.

    I guess the most important thing to remember is, they’re just like you and me.
  8. Squerlli is offline
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    Posted On:
    3/05/2010 8:07pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Hiatus

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by marcusdbrutus View Post
    I’m gonna dispel a few myths, a few rumors. First off, the retardeds don’t rule the night. They don’t rule it – nobody does. And they don’t run in packs. And while they may not be as strong as apes, don’t lock eyes with ‘em, don’t do it. Puts ‘em on edge. They might go into berserker mode, come at you like a whirling dervish, all fists and elbows. You might be screaming, ‘No, no, no,’ – all they hear is, ‘Who wants cake? Who wants cake? Who wants cake?’ Let me tell you something: They all do. They all want cake.

    I guess the most important thing to remember is, they’re just like you and me.
    Truth.
  9. Sley is offline

    mr. Hobbes

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    Posted On:
    3/05/2010 11:58pm


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I have almost no fine motor control , does that count? I can't write, but BJJ takes little fine motor, just a lot of balance and such.

    I am also constantly ever so slightly twitching, even in my sleep. Maybe I'm just a huge dildo. I don't have CP though, something else that they don't have a name for or something, just listed as Neurological Tremors on medical records.
  10. darklight is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/06/2010 12:02am

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Hok se Tong Long

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Uglybugly View Post
    How are you handling your training? Do you have it hard? the guy in my class doesn't have it so hard. It is clearly effecting his performance and it can be hard to understand what he says but that's all.
    I have Spastic Diplegia too and it affects my training to a degree. I train in kung fu, but most of what I say can be applied to any physical activities. When I started out, many of my muscles, particularly those in my legs were very tight. In fact, the reason I started training was to avoid the medical fee of an operation to loosen my hamstrings. I've had many operations, primarily on my legs to reduce tension of the muscles and such. As I began to loosen up, my legs became easier to use and I can kick fairly well, but still with what I assume is "difficulty".

    First and foremost, my lack of muscular sovereignty in my lower body (particularly the right side) has left me unable to jump very high. I just can't get the power. Also, I find it a struggle to co ordinate my feet (ie, to kick with the heel, instep and pivot). Moreover as I study a Southern Chinese art wherein we focus on grounding, I struggle with the fundamentals, though I do manage.

    I'm progressing through the art a little slower than most, but still always moving forward. Some may say I have it hard, but that's just life. I train "hard". My body doesn't always do what I tell it to, and thus I must train ways around it. I'll drill techniques for hours. I'll single step 1000 times a week, and I always push myself. Personally, to develop my muscles in my lower regions I do focus on squats, yet I find them REALLY hard to do. Some may say I "really push", but I prefer to think of it as I'm just devoted to my art. Why not train as much as I can in my spare time?

    Now for something you may be interested in. I've recently been taking some BJJ classes, and found them fun for the most part, the place where I really struggle is the leg locks and my legs being at certain angles. I get lots of cramps in my legs, particularly when they're at odd angles for brief moments. Usually I can feel them about to come on and move my leg accordingly, though the process of dispelling the feeling can take a while. This does affect me in rolling, some times I'll have one of my legs off to the side, away from anything, just until it gets back to normal. Some times this happens in mount, but given my low weight class, most likely guard. As you can imagine, my opponent will spend a lot of time in my half guard.
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