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  1. Conde Koma is offline
    Conde Koma's Avatar

    Thumbs up!

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    Posted On:
    2/08/2010 4:08pm

    supporting member
     Style: Judo,MT,Boxing,BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    There was a deaf family at my old judo dojo (dad and two sons. there was a daughter, but she wasn't deaf). The dad was tough and a legit blackbelt, his sons kind of just spazzed. The big one just muscled everything. They were cool people, though.
  2. Robstafarian is offline
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    Posted On:
    2/08/2010 5:00pm


     Style: None

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Uglybugly View Post
    How are you handling your training? Do you have it hard?
    I am one of the few people on this board who don't train (and also don't troll), hence my low post count. I have it hard in the sense that a lot of things have prevented me from training for the last five years and it will be at least another year before I can train.

    There is nothing more I can add to this thread, but you are all welcome to PM me.
    Quote Originally Posted by Snake Plissken View Post
    cuz FastPass on Indiana Jones was like being a ghetto rock star.
    Quote Originally Posted by Kiko
    But graffiti isn't a bowl of fruit...
    Quote Originally Posted by Robstafarian View Post
    Merely insulting you is not an ad hominem fallacy: them calling you an idiot would be ad hominem if they said "You are an idiot, therefore your argument is invalid."

    What is instead happening is thus:
    1. Your argument is bullshit.
    2. You keep repeating, and expanding upon, your argument.
    3. Therefore, you are an idiot.

    That isn't an ad hominem fallacy; that's inductive reasoning.
  3. Squerlli is offline
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    NO! SLEEP! TILL BROOKLYN!
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    Posted On:
    2/08/2010 5:46pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Hiatus

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Would you mind if I asked why you're curious? Not trying to be a dick, if it's for personal reasons you don't have to answer I'm just wonder why you wanna know about this specific topic.

    Also I've only heard of physically handicapped individuals training in a martial art. I've never seen or heard of a mentally handicapped individual training in a grappling or striking art. I do believe that grappling would be safer then any other combat sport though, maybe with specific provisions it would be possible to actually set up a regiment to specifically work with people with mental problems.
  4. Iainkelt is offline

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    Posted On:
    2/08/2010 6:14pm


     Style: 10thP/BJJ/Wrestling/Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I've known/seen some kids with mild disabilities train in martial arts although I couldn't tell you exactly what the disability was in most cases. Some had moderate attention span issues (more then just the usual kid amount I mean) and required a patient instructor to keep redirecting their attention back to what was being covered. Others had more severe issues and had someone there in class with them to help them go through the techniques and pick up as much as possible. If I remember right in some cases the helper was a parent and in others it was a special aide who worked with the child regularly.

    As with a lot of things, I think it really depends on the instructor to set the tone early when it comes to kids who might need some special/additional help.

    Oh, and I have a good friend who wrestled in high school and once competed against a blind kid. Apparently the only modification was that you had to stay in some kind of contact the whole time. Apparently the kid was very solid on the mat.
  5. 100xobm is offline
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    Posted On:
    2/08/2010 6:48pm


     Style: BJJ, formerly Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I'm blind in one eye. Pretty fucked in the good one too.

    It doesn't affect too much, but visual problems tend to correlate with poor balance. Judo brought me up to scratch pretty rapidly.
  6. PimpDawg is offline

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    Posted On:
    2/08/2010 6:55pm


     Style: BJJ, Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Jim Mastro could give most of us on this forum a serious beating. If not with his judo, then with his ability to do 3,076 push-ups in an hour. Even blind judo is better than Kung Fu.


    I don't know what kind of trickery ESPN is doing, but don't play the video below, click on the link. I don't want that video there.


    Even without sight, Jim Mastro is a visionary - ESPN
    Last edited by PimpDawg; 2/08/2010 7:09pm at .
  7. Gidi is offline

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    Posted On:
    2/08/2010 6:57pm


     Style: Judo (noob) & BJJ (noob)

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Strifes View Post
    That seems highly unlikely.
    Its hard to explain, I don't mean he's playing dead, and sometimes his technique is quite decent, but since he doesn't put the throw with any kuzushi beforehand, he tries to muscle through it, and fails, even with smaller, weaker players who don't offer much resistance, this is especially true on the ground.

    The best explanation is probably a marionette, he really is a bit of a puppet on strings.

    For example, when we do randori, he often plants his feet in the mat and if I slightly pull his gi he would stand in the most unbalanced stance I've seen and stare at me, wondering why that is, along with not trying to correct it. this in turn forces me to either stop and we both regroup, I go: "come closer, step back, move around etc." or pull some more and he falls, no throw, just falls to the ground. and I'm not that strong, he just has a bizarre sense (or lack thereof) of equilibrium. its odd working with him.

    I do however work with him a lot, because I'm still new to Judo, and I don't mind working strictly technical with zero muscling, which I feel is smart for me at the moment. besides there aren't that many people there, so I try working with everyone.
  8. kikoolol is offline

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    Sainte-Foy, Quebec
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    Posted On:
    2/08/2010 7:06pm


     Style: BJJ, Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Jadonblade View Post
    Im currently researching the state of disabilities in BJJ, there are some famous cases that are easier to find. But Every single one Ive been told about or seen has been a physical disability (malformed or non existant limbs,blindness,deafness,etc). What Ive not found is any mental handicaps, has anyone had any experience of training or meeting a bjj practioner who had any type of mental handicap?.

    But also feel free to post any interesting stories of those with physical handicaps.
    Well, I was diagnosed with high-functioning autism a few years ago. I'm not sure if you want to consider it either a handicap or just a difference. Nevertheless, I'll tell you what I can.

    The hardest part was to actually take a swing. Kinda like talking to a girl. I had to psych myself and try to convince myself for a long time before I accepted that starting Judo was a good idea. I'm not comfortable at all around strangers and for a while, I felt quite uncomfortable going there because it both brought anxiety and broke my usual couch-potato routine.

    However, after a few months going there, the time it took for the classes to break into my routine, it just became another part of my week. I stopped being bothered stopping whatever my mind was set to do at the moment to head out to the club. I was lucky because the people at my club were welcoming and encouraging. The laid-back atmosphere really helped me adapt to the new conditions.

    I refrained from telling anyone my condition because frankly, it doesn't show too much at the club (only the head coach knows). I find that the club is one of the only places where I feel somewhat normal. I am much more intimidated going to college than attending judo, and I do have special support at college that would be quite unnecessary at the club. Of course, I'm still not the most co-ordinated man ever, I'm still clumsy and I still have sensory problems like bad depth perception. But damnit, the fact that I get out there and do it like anyone else is what makes me feel, you know, alive.

    As well, I found that I took well to the few formality elements my club has. These little things help shape up the class into a package manageable for me, because they always start the same way and end the same way. Such regularity is comforting to me and helped me adapt, I think. Maybe in a more deregularised training location, I would've been more intimidated.
  9. Gidi is offline

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    Posted On:
    2/09/2010 3:05am


     Style: Judo (noob) & BJJ (noob)

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    This is a very interesting thread, I was wondering about other people's experiences with this stuff ever since I started doing Judo and met that guy. Some of the stories here are really enlightening.

    A while back I told my mother about the guy in my class (she's a psychologist) and asked her for advice about working with him.
    She basically said not to try and force anything and not be over-aggressive, being nice while not condescending. It was really just what I was already doing, but thought it better to get professional advice.
  10. creativo is offline

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    Oct 2008
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    Posted On:
    2/09/2010 7:32am


     Style: Judofitness

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    One of the best players in my club is visually handicapped, he only has some peripheral vision. He participated in three Paralympics and keeps competing; it took me months when I first started judo to realize he wasn't just avoiding eye contact... but he couldn't see, because his balance and general demeanour are more of a good judo player than of a "blind" man. He can still rape me consistently on the mat, he's strong and fast.
    As has been already said, eyesight isn't really of the essence for learning judo.

    We used to have some guys with Down syndrome, and some other whose illness I wouldn't know. Of course what they can do depends on the individual; I never had a problem, they were there to practice, like everybody else, and they worked hard. The lack of coordination limited tachiwaza, they had more fun on the ground where they could work on control and body movement.

    There was a guy with a stiff foot, fixed in an extended position (I don't know the medical name of this malformation); he had insane strength in his upper body and could definitely hold his own in newaza.

    In my experience, judo can adapt to almost any kind of bodytype and condition, especially newaza; moreso BJJ I think, being focused on the ground work. It's been enriching for me to work with all of those people. It's not different than working with a newbie, who lacks coordination or strength; then you get to see how with training everybody gets better, handicapped, noobs or not.
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