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  1. 1point2 is online now
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    Posted On:
    2/03/2010 10:52pm

    Join us... or die
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    Quote Originally Posted by migo View Post
    You're getting punched in the head, how can that not be bad for you? I mean, it's not as if brain tissue is anything like muscle tissue, in which micro-tears make it stronger. At best, you won't have any ill effects, and at worst you die. It's not like weight lifting which has the scope of making you stronger and more resistant to injury all the way to directly causing injury if you **** up and overdo it. Any discussion of boxing and getting punched in the head repeatedly has to admit that there is no risk:reward ratio, only risk.
    Judo has its fair share of concussions, too. Ask Russ. Ask Kimura's training partners. Hell, ask a full-force osotogari near you.

    Technical papers punk!

    http://judoinfo.com/research24.htm
    Contact Sport Concussion Incidence

    Beth A Tommasone, Tamara C Valovich McLeod. Journal of Athletic Training Oct-Dec 2006 Vol.41 , Iss. 4; pg. 470

    Main Results: The overall search identified 559 publications with possible relevance to the incidence of concussion in contact sports. After the titles were screened, 213 articles remained, and their abstracts were reviewed. The abstract screening for relevance yielded 127 articles to which the inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied. The investigators then critically reviewed 63 articles that fit the inclusion criteria. During this critical review, 40 articles did not meet the 5 mandatory criteria listed above and were not evaluated further. After final screening, 23 articles were included in the study. Review of these 23 articles revealed that among team sports for high school males, ice hockey athletes demonstrated the highest incidence of concussion (3.6 per 1000 athlete-exposures [AEs], 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.99-9.29) and soccer athletes the lowest incidence of concussion (0.18 per 1000 AEs, 95% CI = 0.14-0.22). At the professional level, similar concussion incidence rates were found in both ice hockey (6.5 per 1000 player-games, 95% CI = 4.8-8.6) and rugby (9.05 per 1000 player-games, 95% CI = 4.1-17.1) players. When compared with other individual male sports (karate and tae kwon do), boxing had the highest incidence of concussion in professional (0.8 per 10 rounds, 95% CI = 0.75-0.95) and amateur (7.9 per 1000 man-minutes, 95% CI = 5.45-11.09) athletes. Only 6 included studies (5 dealing with tae kwon do and 1 with soccer) addressed concussion incidence in females. Tae kwon do had the highest incidence of concussion (8.77 per 1000 AEs, 95% CI = 0.22-47.9).

    Conclusions: The information presented in the article offers helpful insight into the rate of concussion in athletes from 8 contact sports. Ice hockey seemed to have the greatest incidence of concussion for males, whereas tae kwon do had the highest incidence rate for females. Relatively few rigorous epidemiologic studies on the incidence of concussion exist. Specifically, 63% of the identified studies did not meet the methodologic criteria to be included in this systematic review. In addition, limited information exists on the risk of concussion for females in contact sports. Future authors should address the limitations in reporting incidences, including the lack of adequately measured denominators (person-time at risk), vague definitions of concussion, combining game and practice injuries, and history of concussive injury. Future researchers should also include at least the 5 mandatory methodologic criteria used in the critical appraisal of articles for this review to allow for better reporting of concussion incidence and comparison among various studies. Concussion incidence in females should also be explored.
    Also

    http://assets.usoc.org/assets/docume...thlete.pdf.pdf

    Judo, being widely popular and well represented among the upper classes (including, apparently, doctors and statisticians), has a relatively good body of work regarding injuries, including concussions.
    What a disgrace it is for a man to grow old without ever seeing the beauty and strength of which his body is capable. -Xenophon's Socrates
  2. DdlR is offline
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    Posted On:
    2/03/2010 11:24pm

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    Somewhere out there is a report by a doctor who semi-seriously recommended a return to 19th century bare-knuckle rules as a way to reduce traumatic brain injuries in boxing. His reasoning was that, because bare-knuckle pugilism favors clinching and throwing over infighting, boxers would receive fewer aggregate punches. Also, their unprotected hands would give out earlier in their careers, thus reducing their chances of brain injury.
  3. TheRuss is offline
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    is badder than you

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    Posted On:
    2/03/2010 11:53pm

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    Quote Originally Posted by 1point2 View Post
    Ask Russ.
    *sigh*

    Yeah, pretty much just search for concus* in my post history.

    As much as I hate to say it, unless we come up with some serious pharmacological-type interventions for chronic traumatic encephalopathy, when we admit to having played football/boxed/etc., our grandkids are going to look at us like we look at our grandparents when they tell us they played with mercury as kids.

    But in the end, the game lives by the collision. Unless that changes someday, bodies (and minds) will be subjected to ever greater punishment. That is the cost of doing business.
    -Tim Layden in SI
    Quote Originally Posted by Emevas View Post
    Downstreet on the flip-flop, timepants.
  4. Deadmeat is offline
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    Posted On:
    2/03/2010 11:55pm


     Style: Mixed Martial Arts

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    Through opportunities arising from time to time at work, I've spoken to numerous medical professionals on that topic, and every neurologist I've asked agreed that one (or few) punch knockouts with 4oz gloves are far less damaging long term then repeated blunt trauma to the head with 10+ oz gloves.
  5. The Question is offline
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    Posted On:
    2/04/2010 12:05am

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    Quote Originally Posted by migo View Post
    You're getting punched in the head, how can that not be bad for you? I mean, it's not as if brain tissue is anything like muscle tissue, in which micro-tears make it stronger. At best, you won't have any ill effects, and at worst you die. It's not like weight lifting which has the scope of making you stronger and more resistant to injury all the way to directly causing injury if you **** up and overdo it. Any discussion of boxing and getting punched in the head repeatedly has to admit that there is no risk:reward ratio, only risk.
    You know in some cultures, fat women are considered hot, and slim women are considered to be ... you know ... not hot.

    Oh, I was just posting some irrelevant **** in order return the favor you did me, you silly ************.

    At no point did anyone mention anything about risk: reward ratio. This thread is about analyzing the injuries. The injuries, ************. Who the **** is thinking about "brain conditioning"?

    Yes, getting punched in the head is bad for you. So is drinking alcohol. In fact, I would bet a fat wad of dough straight from the Pillsbury boy's kitchen that more people die and get injured from alcohol related incidents than from being punched in the head. Does that mean motherfuckers should stop drinking alcohol? How would anybody get laid?

    ****. Are you retarded?
    Quote Originally Posted by Goju - joe
    being a dick with skill is only marginally better than being a dick without skill.
  6. TheRuss is offline
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    is badder than you

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    Posted On:
    2/04/2010 12:10am

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Question View Post
    Yes, getting punched in the head is bad for you. So is drinking alcohol. In fact, I would bet a fat wad of dough straight from the Pillsbury boy's kitchen that more people die and get injured from alcohol related incidents than from being punched in the head. Does that mean motherfuckers should stop drinking alcohol? How would anybody get laid?
    I'm pretty sure you just brought up risk:reward.

    Look, Q, do you want to learn about this **** or not?
    Quote Originally Posted by Emevas View Post
    Downstreet on the flip-flop, timepants.
  7. Petter is offline

    12th level logic wielder

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    Posted On:
    2/04/2010 12:22am


     Style: BJJ, judo, rapier

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    Quote Originally Posted by migo View Post
    Any discussion of boxing and getting punched in the head repeatedly has to admit that there is no risk:reward ratio, only risk.
    Getting punched in the head may be pure risk (though I’m sure there are people…), but you cannot seriously think that there is no reward involved in boxing.
    [ petterhaggholm.net | blog | essays ]
    [ self defence: general thoughts | bjj: “don’t go to the ground”? ]
    “The plural of anecdote is anecdotes, not data.”
  8. Arcan is offline

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    Posted On:
    2/04/2010 1:57am

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    Quote Originally Posted by sainthamish View Post
    There is a possible link between the two but nothing definate. However it can be assumed that there is a connection between head injuries and Parkinsonism.



    Hopefully a Med Ex could clarify some details in this thread....

    EDIT: Link - http://www.neuroskills.com/pr-parkinsons.shtml
    Epidemiologic studies by definition can only show association, not causation. To prove causation, you would need to do a randomized controlled trial which would have two major problems: convincing an Institutional Review Board (IRB) to let you inflict head injuries on study subjects and finding said subjects.

    Also, the sports mentioned in terms of top number of admits for head injury have many more practioners than combat sports. By way of analogy, the majority of people that die each year didn't suffer a gunshot to the head. However, most people that get shot in the head do die (high fatality RATE)
  9. antman is offline

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    Posted On:
    2/04/2010 3:06am


     Style: Silat, New to Hsing- Yi

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is something you want to look into

    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/28/sp....19747479.html
    http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/168515.php

    The cener mentioned either had a segment on HBO real sports or ESPN last yr.
    "Its not important to be strong, its just important not to be weak."
  10. antman is offline

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    Posted On:
    2/04/2010 3:07am


     Style: Silat, New to Hsing- Yi

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is something you want to look into

    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/28/sp....19747479.html
    http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/168515.php

    The cener mentioned either had a segment on HBO real sports or ESPN last yr.

    look for reasearch from this doc: Robert Cantu, MD
    "Its not important to be strong, its just important not to be weak."
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