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  1. Matt Phillips is offline
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    NOTE TO SELF - MOAR GRAPPLE - GET A NORMAL HAIR CUT - REPEAT

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    Posted On:
    1/28/2010 9:25pm

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     Style: Novice Sub Grappler

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by fourTwenty View Post
    First time you hear the phrase dropped on air during a UFC production is UFC 17 (5/15/98). Goldy looses the phrase "Superbowl of Mixed Martial Arts" and that's the first time you hear it. It was Mixed Match Martial Arts during UFC Ultimate Japan but then it went back to NHB/Reality Fighting/ No Rules Fighting.

    ****, Goldy has always sucked ass.
    Thanks for that. Are you saying you watched the other 18 events, or that's the earliest you recall?
    Now darkness comes; you don't know if the whales are coming. - Royce Gracie


    KosherKickboxer has t3h r34l chi sao

    In De Janerio, in blackest night,
    Luta Livre flees the fight,
    Behold Maeda's sacred tights;
    Beware my power... Blue Lantern's light!
  2. fourTwenty is offline

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    Posted On:
    1/29/2010 6:07pm


     Style: Backyard Crappling

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I watched 5-18. UFC 18 (1/08/99) is the first time you hear the term "Mixed Martial Arts" used on air during a UFC broadcast.
  3. Matt Phillips is offline
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    NOTE TO SELF - MOAR GRAPPLE - GET A NORMAL HAIR CUT - REPEAT

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    Posted On:
    1/29/2010 11:59pm

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     Style: Novice Sub Grappler

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by fourTwenty View Post
    I watched 5-18. UFC 18 (1/08/99) is the first time you hear the term "Mixed Martial Arts" used on air during a UFC broadcast.
    That's very useful. And never by Blatnik at that point?
    Now darkness comes; you don't know if the whales are coming. - Royce Gracie


    KosherKickboxer has t3h r34l chi sao

    In De Janerio, in blackest night,
    Luta Livre flees the fight,
    Behold Maeda's sacred tights;
    Beware my power... Blue Lantern's light!
  4. Matt Phillips is offline
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    NOTE TO SELF - MOAR GRAPPLE - GET A NORMAL HAIR CUT - REPEAT

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    Posted On:
    12/05/2010 10:06pm

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     Style: Novice Sub Grappler

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    UPDATE

    In a recent interview (starting at 25:40), John McCarthy stated to Stephen Quadros that Jeff Blatnick was the originator of the term. I started a new round of research to nail down the earliest use of the term in print by Blatnick. While I was sifting through results, I found a new, earlier usage by an independent journalist, from just after the first UFC, well before Blatnick was involved with the sport at all:

    `Ultimate' Fight Lives Up to Name Television: Pay-Per-View Battle, Instead of Being Merely Gory and Funny, Gets Interesting After the First Two Bouts[Home Edition]Los Angeles Times (pre-1997 Fulltext) - Los Angeles, Calif. Author:HOWARD ROSENBERGDate:Nov 15, 1993Start Page:1Section:Calendar; PART-F; Calendar DeskText Word Count:898 Document TextYes, as a regular television viewer, I'd seen my share of violence.
    But this time, leaning forward on the edge of my chair in front of my TV set shortly before 6 p.m. Friday, I was poised to wince, flinch, shudder and scream out in terror as never before.
    To say nothing of laugh.
    And no wonder, for about to enter my home from Denver's McNichols Arena was the "Ultimate Fighting Championship," a live pay-for-view cable event ($14.95 a pop) in which "eight of the deadliest fighters in the world" would be competing for $50,000 in a fenced-in, eight-sided ring designed for . . .
    NOHHHHHH ESCAAAAAPE!!!
    The eclectic field of "deadlies" for this SEG-produced spectacular consisted of a sumo wrestler, savate champion, kick boxer, karate specialist, jujitsu whiz, cruiserweight prizefighter, "shootfighter" and tae kwon do expert. Everyone was here but David "Kung Fu" Carradine.
    Having survived the prelims, these guys would pair off in single-elimination bouts, with the two finalists meeting to decide who was the "ultimate fighter." A win would occur when there was a knockout, a "chokeout," a doctor's intervention, a corner throwing in the towel or a fighter giving up by tapping on the ground four times.
    As for rules, except for eye gouges, groin shots, biting-and of course using knives, guns or explosives-no tactic was forbidden. Not even spitting?
    "If you think you know tough," shouted an advance promo, "you ain't seen nuthin' yet!"
    Ring announcer Ron "The G-Man" Goins was ready. TV commentators Bill Wallace, Kathy Long (a former kick-boxing champ) and Jim Brown (the community activist and former pro football great) were ready. I was ready.
    And so were the first pair of contenders, savate champ Gerard Gordeau of the Netherlands and Teila Tuli, a 410-pound sumo wrestler from Hawaii. Like all the fighters, they and their entourages entered the arena the high-concept way, through a haze of smoke and colored lights.
    "I see the perspiration, I see the anxiety," Brown said. "But you also see the respect," Wallace said.
    Soon they were seeing the massacre. After 26 seconds, punctuated by a savage kick to the already grounded Tuli's face that sent a tooth flying and blood pouring from his mouth, Gordeau advanced to the next round when the doctor stopped the fight.
    Next, karate expert Zane Frazier of North Hollywood was worn down in less than a minute by kick-boxer Kevin Rosier, a roly-poly 265-pounder from Buffalo, N.Y., who wore his trunks over his belly like Martin Short's Ed Grimley. After exhausting himself by repeatedly kneeing Rosier in the head and the groin area, Frazier helplessly collapsed onto the canvas, and his corner threw in the towel when Rosier stomped on his head.
    "The crowd seems to be enjoying it," Wallace said.
    The crowd would have enjoyed the Christians and lions. Fights broke out throughout the evening, not only in the ring, but all around the announcers and elsewhere in the arena. "This is the most alive group of people I've ever seen," Brown said. "In fact, I'm kind of worried."
    After defeating Frazier, meanwhile, Rosier disclosed his strategy to an interviewer: "Let him hit me." Very shrewd. And incredibly, it worked.
    Yet a curious thing happened after the first two contests. Instead of merely gory and funny, the "Ultimate Fighting Championship" began getting interesting.
    St. Louis cruiserweight boxer Art Jimmerson didn't get to throw even one punch before giving up. He was swiftly taken down and dispatched with a chokehold by jujitsu master Royce Gracie, whose family is synonymous with the sport in their native Brazil, where mixed-martial arts championships like this one are commonplace.
    In the battle of 220-pound strongmen that followed, Lockeford, Calif., shootfighter Ken Shamrock looked invincible in getting tae kwon do battler Pat Smith of Denver to submit to a painful ankle twist, setting up an intriguing semifinal with the much-lighter Gracie.
    The Shamrock-Gracie winner would face Gordeau. Even though he had broken his hand against the sumo wrestler Tuli, the Dutchman easily battered the blimpish Rosier, who again succeed in getting his opponent to hit him, but unfortunately in all the wrong places. Defenseless on the canvas, Rosier took a rib kick from Gordeau that made your own ribs ache.
    The semifinal between Shamrock and Gracie was the evening's best, with the Californian getting an early advantage, only to be taken down by Gracie and choked into submission. Like a constricting anaconda that is unstoppable once it has you in its coils, Gracie used the same breath-stopping technique to easily cut off the windpipe of the much-bigger Gordeau in the final, winning the championship and the $50,000.
    Refreshingly, "The Ultimate Fighting Championship" featured little of the obligatory bravado and trash talking that usually accompanies prizefighting. In fact, the sportsmanship in post-match interviews was striking, with Shamrock praising his conqueror, Gracie, for example, and the gregarious Rosier-this event's Mr. Congeniality-repeatedly lauding the man who had clobbered him, Gordeau. Obviously, they had recalled Key Luke's "Kung Fu" advice to Carradine: "The wise man walks away with his head bowed, humble like the dust."
    That humility also applied to Gracie, who afterward celebrated his family instead of himself. His brother, Rorian, founded a jujitsu academy in Torrance.
    It was fascinating to watch Gracie strategize and employ his jujitsu moves in his matches, which were all one-sided. "I found my sport," Brown said. Me, too.
    And we thought we knew tough.
    Last edited by Matt Phillips; 12/05/2010 10:51pm at .
    Now darkness comes; you don't know if the whales are coming. - Royce Gracie


    KosherKickboxer has t3h r34l chi sao

    In De Janerio, in blackest night,
    Luta Livre flees the fight,
    Behold Maeda's sacred tights;
    Beware my power... Blue Lantern's light!
  5. Matt Phillips is offline
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    NOTE TO SELF - MOAR GRAPPLE - GET A NORMAL HAIR CUT - REPEAT

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    Posted On:
    12/05/2010 10:21pm

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     Style: Novice Sub Grappler

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Here's Blatnick's earliest usage in print I have been able to find:

    Feb 4, 1997
    .c The Associated Press
    By SHANNON McCAFFREY
    Associated Press Writer
    ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) -- Ultimate fighting moves into a different
    arena Wednesday, when both the New York state Senate and Assembly
    plan to vote on bills to curtail or ban the often bloody contests.
    The Senate will have before it a measure that would give local
    governments throughout the state the option of outlawing the
    matches within their jurisdictions. The Assembly is weighing a bill
    that would ban them outright everywhere in the state.
    Republican Sen. Roy Goodman of Manhattan, sponsor of the
    local-option bill, called the sport ``human cockfighting'' at a
    meeting of the Senate tourism committee Tuesday.
    ``People end up emulating these kinds of violence. They're
    barroom brawls. They're alley fighting. They're disgusting,'' he
    said.
    Jeff Blatnick, a 1984 gold medalist in Greco-Roman wrestling at
    the Los Angeles Olympics, appeared before lawmakers at the same
    meeting to defend the matches, which combine martial arts, boxing
    and street brawling.
    ``Our sport is a mixed martial arts competition,'' said
    Blatnick, who beat cancer to win the gold medal. ``To call it
    `human cockfighting' or `street brawling' is an insult to the
    athletes and an insult to the millions who participate in those
    martial arts disciplines.''
    Blatnick, 39, who lives in the Albany suburb of Clifton Park,
    does color commentator for pay-per-view telecasts of the matches.
    He said ultimate fighting had been compared erroneously by New York
    City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani and others to extreme fighting, which
    has very few guidelines for fighter safety.
    But he said new rules passed last week by the state Athletic
    Commission have defanged the sport. The three-member commission
    passed rules that require the normally bareheaded and bare-knuckled
    combatants to wear head gear, boxing gloves and groin protectors.
    They are also not allowed to strike opponents when they are down
    on the mat. Head-butting, choke holds and kicking above the
    shoulder or below the knees are also prohibited under the new
    rules, which go into effect Wednesday. That is just two days before
    the state's first match is scheduled in Niagara Falls since New
    York legalized the contests.
    ``It'd be akin to in football you can't run into anyone and in
    basketball you don't have a basket anymore,'' Blatnick said of the
    new rules.
    The athletic commission is chaired by former world heavyweight
    boxing champion Floyd Patterson. Ultimate fighting is second only
    to boxing in pay-per-view revenues, Blatnick said.
    Gov. George Pataki has introduced legislation to ban ultimate
    fighting. State officials made it clear last week that the new
    regulations were designed to make the contests so boring neither
    fans nor promoters would be interested.
    State Sen. John DeFrancisco, a Syracuse Republican who chairs
    the Tourism, Recreation and Sports Development Committee, agreed
    the new state rules may kill the contests in New York, regardless
    of legislative action
    ``(The regulations) basically change the whole nature of what
    this sport's originally intended to be which is a no-rules
    operation,'' he said. ``I've got a feeling that with the
    regulations, it's going to be very difficult to promote them
    here.''
    DeFrancisco's committee voted 10-1 Tuesday to send the ultimate
    fighting bill to the floor of the Senate.
    Now darkness comes; you don't know if the whales are coming. - Royce Gracie


    KosherKickboxer has t3h r34l chi sao

    In De Janerio, in blackest night,
    Luta Livre flees the fight,
    Behold Maeda's sacred tights;
    Beware my power... Blue Lantern's light!
  6. MMAlee is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/04/2011 7:44pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: BJJ MMA

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    people have been mixing fighting techniques since before 'traditional schools' or brands ever even begun.......
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