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  1. Matt Phillips is offline
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    NOTE TO SELF - MOAR GRAPPLE - GET A NORMAL HAIR CUT - REPEAT

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    Posted On:
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    I really don't think the catch-phrases on the (early) event ads were supposed to be names of the events. The titles seemed more like names of the product (VHS tapes) than the events themselves. UFC I and II weren't called "The Beginning" and "No Way Out", those were the names of the tapes.
    Now darkness comes; you don't know if the whales are coming. - Royce Gracie


    KosherKickboxer has t3h r34l chi sao

    In De Janerio, in blackest night,
    Luta Livre flees the fight,
    Behold Maeda's sacred tights;
    Beware my power... Blue Lantern's light!
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    Posted On:
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    Edit: Somehow I don't think UFC VII was originally called "If It's Not In The Octagon...It's Not Real" Lol!

    Edit: Edit: Who is this Draka fighter they keep advertising? Any chance that's Omega?
    Last edited by Matt Phillips; 1/20/2010 10:23pm at .
    Now darkness comes; you don't know if the whales are coming. - Royce Gracie


    KosherKickboxer has t3h r34l chi sao

    In De Janerio, in blackest night,
    Luta Livre flees the fight,
    Behold Maeda's sacred tights;
    Beware my power... Blue Lantern's light!
  3. Matt Phillips is offline
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    NOTE TO SELF - MOAR GRAPPLE - GET A NORMAL HAIR CUT - REPEAT

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    Posted On:
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    SEG SPORTS CORP. and MIRACLE PROMOTIONS INCORPORATED, Plaintiffs, -against- THE STATE ATHLETIC COMMISSION, A DIVISION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, FLOYD PATTERSON, and ROSE TRENTMAN, individually and in their capacities as members of the New York State Athletic Commission, Defendants.
    97 Civ. 0712 (MGC)
    UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF NEW YORK
    952 F. Supp. 202; 1997 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 1115

    February 6, 1997, Decided
    February 6, 1997, FILED
    DISPOSITION: [**1] Plaintiffs' motion for preliminary injunction denied

    CASE SUMMARY
    PROCEDURAL POSTURE: Before the court was plaintiff promoters' motion for a preliminary injunction in an action against defendants, the State Athletic Commission (commission) and its members, under 42 U.S.C.S. § 1983 for damages and under the United States Constitution and the New York State Constitution for declaratory and injunctive relief.
    OVERVIEW: The promoters were engaged in the business of facilitating ultimate fighting events, which were governed by a set of rules promulgated by the promoters. A fighting event was scheduled in New York, and just prior to the event the commission issued its own set of rules that conflicted with those of the promoters. As a result, the promoters filed an action against the commission and its members seeking declaratory and injunctive relief. Specifically, the promoters sought a preliminary injunction seeking to prevent the application of the commission's rules in the ultimate fighting event. The court noted that issuance of a preliminary injunction rested upon the promoters ability to demonstrate irreparable harm and either a likelihood of success on the merits of the claim, or sufficiently serious questions that went to the claim as to have made it fair ground for litigation. The court concluded that although the promoters made a strong showing that one of the new rules was in direct conflict with the promoters' rules, the motion for a preliminary injunction was denied because the promoters did not show irreparable harm, the threshold requirement for issuance of a preliminary injunction.
    OUTCOME: The promoters' motion for a preliminary injunction seeking to prevent application of the commission's rules to the promoters' ultimate fighting events was denied.


    CORE TERMS: fighting, championship, sport, preliminary injunction, combative, scheduled, Commission Rules, referee, bout, irreparable harm, injunction, mandatory, license, N.Y Laws, customers, kicks, new rules, injunctive relief, threshold requirement, regulating, equitable, issuance, cancel, trade name, cable television, television, competitor, reputation, wrestling, satellite

    LexisNexis® Headnotes Hide Headnotes

    Civil Procedure > Remedies > Injunctions > Preliminary & Temporary Injunctions
    HN1Equitable relief requires a showing that there is no adequate remedy at law. Accordingly, issuance of a preliminary injunction is appropriate only when the party seeking such equitable relief demonstrates (a) irreparable harm and (b) either (i) a likelihood of success on the merits of the claim, or (ii) sufficiently serious questions going to the merits of the claim as to make it fair ground for litigation, and the balance of the hardships tipping decidedly in favor of the movant.

    Civil Procedure > Remedies > Injunctions > Preliminary & Temporary Injunctions
    HN2When injunctive relief is mandatory in the sense that it will alter, rather than maintain the status quo, a heightened standard is applied.

    Civil Procedure > Remedies > Injunctions > Elements > Irreparable Harm
    HN3For any injunction, the threshold requirement is proof of irreparable harm. Irreparable harm is injury for which money cannot compensate.


    COUNSEL: APPEARANCES:

    For Plaintiffs: SIMON, MEYROWITZ, MEYROWITZ & SCHLUSSEL, New York, New York, By: David H. Meyrowitz, Esq., Paul Hecht, Esq., Mitchell Shenkman, Esq.

    For Defendants: DENNIS C. VACCO, Attorney General of the State of New York, New York, New York, By: Joel Graber, Assistant Attorney General.

    JUDGES: MIRIAM GOLDMAN CEDARBAUM, United States District Judge

    OPINION BY: MIRIAM GOLDMAN CEDARBAUM

    OPINION
    [*203] OPINION
    CEDARBAUM, J.
    This is an action under 42 U.S.C. § 1983 for damages and under the United States Constitution and the New York State Constitution for declaratory and injunctive relief. The defendants are the State Athletic Commission and two of its members. The dispute centers on the relationship between the recently enacted state statute that authorizes "combative sports" events and the Commission's new rules regulating such events.
    Plaintiff SEG Sports Corporation produces and promotes the Ultimate Fighting Championships and has been doing so for the past three years. SEG plans to put on an Ultimate Fighting Championship in Niagara Falls, New York on February 7, 1997, one day after the effective date of the statute. [**2] On January 30, 1997, the New York State Athletic Commission issued temporary rules that impose certain requirements on the participants in the Ultimate Fighting Championship. Plaintiffs seek by order to show cause a preliminary injunction restraining the Commission from enforcing the new rules.
    I held a hearing on February 5, 1997 at which the parties were permitted to present evidence. Plaintiffs called four witnesses, two officers of SEG, one referee, and one closed circuit television intermediary who had contracted with SEG for television access to the scheduled Ultimate Fighting Championship.
    Although plaintiffs make a strong showing that one of the new rules, the requirement of boxing gloves, is in direct conflict with the statute, plaintiffs' motion for a preliminary injunction is denied because plaintiffs have not shown irreparable harm, the threshold requirement for issuance of a preliminary injunction.
    The Facts
    Ultimate Fighting is the trade name for a combative sport developed by plaintiff SEG. The Ultimate Fighting Championship is a competition among athletes from different fighting sports. Both grappling and striking are permitted because Ultimate Fighting combines [**3] many types of fighting. Some of the techniques the athletes use come from sumo, kick-boxing, tae kwon do, jiu-jitsu, karate, Greco-Roman wrestling, judo, shootfighting, and kempo. The competitors fight in an octagonally shaped ring, and Ultimate Fighting Championships produced by SEG in the past have consisted of two preliminary matches, a single-elimination tournament with eight participants, and a match between a reigning champion and a prior victor. To date, SEG has produced and promoted thirteen such Ultimate Fighting Championships, twelve of them in states other than New York, and has televised them worldwide by cable television and satellite. In August of 1995, SEG staged an Ultimate Fighting Championship in Buffalo, New York.
    The participants in the Ultimate Fighting Championships have been subject to the rules established by SEG. Among other things, the rules provide for mandatory protective gear for the mouth and groin, prohibition of eye gouging, biting, and throat strikes, medical testing, and supervision by referees and judges. The rules also provide for the fight to be stopped upon the request of a competitor, coach, doctor, or referee. There is another business that [**4] stages similar competitions under the trade name "Extreme Fighting" and follows slightly different rules.
    In October of 1996, the New York State Legislature amended the statute governing boxing and wrestling to add "combative sports." The amended statute takes effect today, February 6, 1997, 120 days after its enactment. The statute defines "combative sports" as "any professional mixed martial arts bout or event wherein the participants deliver, or are not forbidden by the applicable rules thereof from delivering kicks, punches or blows, other than eye gouging, biting, throat strikes and kicks if hard sole shoes are worn, to the body of an opponent." N.Y. Laws of 1920, ch. 912 § 5-a.1(c), McKinney's 1996 Sess. Law News of N.Y., ch. 708, s. 7708 (the amendments are referred to hereinafter as "N.Y. Laws of 1920, ch. 912").
    [*204] The statute requires the procurement of a license from the New York State Athletic Commission to stage a "combative sports" event. The statute gives the Commission "sole discretion, management, control and jurisdiction over such combative sports bouts or events to be conducted, held or given within the state of New York and over all licenses to any and all persons [**5] who participate in such combative sports bouts." N.Y. Laws of 1920, ch. 912 § 5-a. 1(d), 3 and 4.
    After passage of the statute, plaintiffs scheduled and made the necessary arrangements to stage an Ultimate Fighting Championship in Niagara Falls on February 7, 1997, the day after the statute's effective date. Plaintiffs sold over $ 150,000 in tickets for the live audience, and made plans to broadcast the event by cable television and satellite. In arranging the event, plaintiffs entered into contracts with the Niagara Falls Convention and Civic Center, Reiss Media Enterprises, TVN Entertainment, DirecTV, Viewers Choice, and the individual fighters. They paid for medical testing and made arrangements for lodging, referees, judges, and ringside physicians.
    On January 30, 1997, the New York State Athletic Commission issued temporary rules regulating "combative sports." 19 NYCRR ch. VII, Rules of the New York State Athletic Commission (1997) ("Commission Rules"). Among other things, the rules require the ring to be at least 40 feet in diameter, Commission Rules § 209.39, fighters to wear eight ounce thumbless or thumblock gloves, Commission Rules § 209.45(i), and bouts to be conducted [**6] in three or four five-minute rounds, Commission Rules § 217.3. The rules also prohibit kicks above the shoulders, head butting, choke holds, and striking or kicking a grounded opponent. Commission Rules § 217.27.
    Discussion
    HN1Equitable relief requires a showing that there is no adequate remedy at law. Accordingly, issuance of a preliminary injunction is appropriate only when the party seeking such equitable relief demonstrates (a) irreparable harm and (b) either (i) a likelihood of success on the merits of the claim, or (ii) sufficiently serious questions going to the merits of the claim as to make it fair ground for litigation, and the balance of the hardships tipping decidedly in favor of the movant. Malkentzos v. DeBuono, 102 F.3d 50, 54 (1996); Woods v. Universal City Studios, 920 F. Supp. 62, 64 (S.D.N.Y. 1996).
    In this case, plaintiffs are not merely seeking a prohibitory injunction, but rather a mandatory injunction that requires the New York State Athletic Commission to license them to follow their own rules, and not those of the Commission. HN2When injunctive relief is mandatory in the sense that it will alter, rather than maintain the status quo, a heightened [**7] standard is applied. Tom Doherty Associates, Inc. v. Saban Entertainment, Inc., 60 F.3d 27, 33-34 (2d Cir. 1996); Jacobson & Co., Inc. v. Armstrong Cork Co., 548 F.2d 438, 441 (2d Cir. 1977).
    HN3For any injunction, the threshold requirement is proof of irreparable harm. Irreparable harm is injury for which money cannot compensate. Tom Doherty Associates, Inc. v. Saban Entertainment, Inc., 60 F.3d at 37. The harm that plaintiffs allege is that they will have to cancel the Ultimate Fighting Championship which they have scheduled for February 7, 1997, because compliance with the Commission's rules would radically change the nature of the event. Although plaintiffs have shown that they will lose money if they cannot hold the event in accordance with their own rules, they have not shown the substantial non-monetary injury required for a preliminary injunction.
    Although plaintiffs argue that if they do not stage the championship as advertised they will lose what they describe as good will, they have not persuaded me with a fair preponderance of the credible evidence that they will be unable in the future to successfully stage other performances. Plaintiffs have been in this business [**8] somewhat more than three years. No evidence was presented that their pay-per-view customers are the same from event to event or that any of their customers will refuse to view later events produced and promoted by them.
    [*205] After examining the documents and evaluating the testimony of the witnesses, I find that cancellation of the Ultimate Fighting Championship in Niagara Falls is measurable in money, and that any long-range damages to plaintiffs' reputation is purely speculative. Plaintiffs have presented no evidence that their reputation among their customers will be damaged if they decide to cancel the event scheduled for February 7 because of new and unexpected New York rules. Thus, plaintiffs have not shown that without a preliminary injunction, they will be irreparably harmed. Without such a showing, a preliminary injunction may not issue.
    Conclusion
    The foregoing shall constitute my findings of fact and conclusions of law based on the submissions of the parties and the testimony at the hearing held on February 5, 1997.
    For the reasons set forth above, I deny plaintiffs' motion for a preliminary injunction.
    SO ORDERED.
    Dated: New York, New York
    February 6, 1997
    [**9] MIRIAM GOLDMAN CEDARBAUM
    United States District Judge
    Now darkness comes; you don't know if the whales are coming. - Royce Gracie


    KosherKickboxer has t3h r34l chi sao

    In De Janerio, in blackest night,
    Luta Livre flees the fight,
    Behold Maeda's sacred tights;
    Beware my power... Blue Lantern's light!
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    Posted On:
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    CNN
    December 6, 1995
    SHOW: Larry King Live 9:00 pm ET
    Ultimate Fighting

    GUESTS: LEXIS-NEXIS Related Topics Full Article Related Topics Overview

    This document contains no targeted Topics.

    BYLINE: LARRY KING;

    SECTION: News; Domestic

    LENGTH: 9207 words

    HIGHLIGHT: King moderates a panel discussion on the new sport of Ultimate Fighting, which is a mixture of fighting styles relying heavily on martial arts mixtures. Violence of sport is concern of many.



    Ultimate Fighting

    LARRY KING: -Roman gladiator at battle. Tonight, a look at a frightening new fad that may be coming to your town. Plus, he's the kind of country music superstar whose name is a household word: Garth Brooks. Just ahead on Larry King Live.

    ANNOUNCER: Now, live from Washington, here's Larry King.

    LARRY KING: Good evening. Some call it entertainment: the competitors in the octagon, using martial arts skill until one surrenders, or is knocked unconscious. It is called Ultimate Fighting. Some say this sport is ultimate brutality.

    Here to discuss this new pop culture craze are two who favor it, Ultimate Fighting Championship, Robert Meyrowitz, and Ultimate Fighting Superfight Champion, Ken Shamrock. Two men who oppose the sport are Nevada State Athletic Commission Executive Director, Marc Ratner, and Arizona Sen. John McCain. McCain and Meyrowitz are with us here in Washington. Shamrock is at our LA studios, and Marc Ratner is in Las Vegas.

    And we will start with Bob Meyrowitz. Since you created this Ultimate Fighting Championship, where did you find it?

    BOB MEYROWITZ, Creator 'Ultimate Fighting Championship': Well, actually, it was a concept when a friend of mine kept telling me about tae kwon do, and how tough tae kwon do is, and I said, 'Is tae kwon do superior to karate?' And he said, 'You don't get it, they don't fight each other.' And that then became of interest to us, 'They don't fight each other?' Then how do you know which martial art is superior? We then found out that in Japan, South America, and many countries they did have mixed martial arts and so we brought that concept here to America.

    LARRY KING: And it is called Ultimate Fighting?

    BOB MEYROWITZ: Ultimate Fighting Championship.

    LARRY KING: And it is mixed martial arts?

    BOB MEYROWITZ: It is mixed martial arts.

    LARRY KING: Is that's the concept?

    BOB MEYROWITZ: That's correct.

    LARRY KING: In other words, I can use anything I want to use?

    BOB MEYROWITZ: Any martial art you have.

    LARRY KING: John, what's the rub, Senator?

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN, (R), Arizona: Well, you saw some of the clips there, some of it is so brutal that it nauseates people, even hardened individuals are repelled by this. It's- it's the most-

    LARRY KING: You were a boxer, weren't you?

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: I was a boxer and a wrestler, both very mediocre. But I- I would point out that this kind of sport, first of all, I think the health of the combatants is at risk, when you have basically no rules except for eye gouging, kind of a sport. And second of all, it appeals to the lowest common denominator in our society and it is soemthing that I think there is just no place for.

    LARRY KING: Beyond consenting adults, then?

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: Well, I think there are lots of things that we prevent consenting adults from doing. We wouldn't let two people do what they are doing in that octagon, in a bar, or on the street. We regulate all other sports, where we emphasize safety. This sport emphasizes blood, it emphasizes injuring or crippling one of the combatants.

    LARRY KING: Ken Shamrock, an Ultimate Fighting Superfight Champion, in fact, you will be commentating at a big championship in Denver, on December 16th. Why do you do this?

    KEN SHAMROCK, Ultimate Fighting Champion: Well, it's a sport, you know, or it's an event. It's a chance where you can go in and test your ability against someone else's ability. And it's not necessarily like Sen. McCain is saying. He's saying it is more like brutal- brutality. To me brutality is when another person beats up another person on the street. But when you are talking about an event where you have two professional athletes stepping into the ring, and competing against each other, I call that an event. I don't call that brutality.

    LARRY KING: But-

    KEN SHAMROCK: Boxing has an event, football has an event, hockey has an event, but nevertheless you still have people getting hurt in those events.

    LARRY KING: Are there rounds, Ken?

    KEN SHAMROCK: No, there are no rounds. It's 30 minute time periods. And then there is a five minute overtime if it comes to a draw.

    LARRY KING: And then if no fighter- after 35 minutes it's declared a draw?

    KEN SHAMROCK: Yes.

    LARRY KING: And you lose by being knocked unconscious or quitting?

    KEN SHAMROCK: Yes. There is- there is actually three ways: the referee can intervene in the fight if the man is unconscious, or if he has a cut that he thinks it is severe enough to stop the fight, he will step in, if the corner guy cannot see it. Another way you can lose is if the corner guy throws in the towel, noticing that his fighter is not-

    LARRY KING: Mm-hm.

    KEN SHAMROCK: -going to do his best at that point in time. Also, a tap out can also happen and a knockout.

    LARRY KING: What's that?

    KEN SHAMROCK: A tap out is when a guy gets a hold, like a choke hold, arm bar, leg lock, heel hook, ankle hold- anything that has to do with a submission or a joint lock-

    LARRY KING: Checkmate.

    KEN SHAMROCK: -you can tap out. Yeah, it's like checkmate.

    LARRY KING: Okay. Marc, how is this different than just an extension of boxing or hockey?

    MARC RATNER, Nevada Athletic Commission: Well, I consider boxing a sport, I consider the Ultimate Fighting as an entertainment. And it is- it is very violent. In boxing, we have regulations, they wear gloves, they are medically checked before they go in the ring, we have doctors, neurosurgeons at ringside in case of any problems. We're very well regulated in the sport of boxing. And this sport is not regulated whatsoever.

    LARRY KING: Does Nevada allow it?

    MARC RATNER: No, sir.

    LARRY KING: How many states-

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: Marc, do you know of any state that has boxing commissions-

    BOB MEYROWITZ: Excuse me. Can I just interject one second? I- what Marc says is true about boxing, it also happens to be true about Ultimate Fighting. All of our fighters are checked by a physician prior to the fight, checked by another physician at the fight, we have three physicians, accredited physicians, from various state athletic commisions who check them there. And we do everything that the most strenuous athletic commission would ask us to do. So it is really not correct that we don't do everything that everyone else is doing. We're doing exactly what boxing is doing. The only difference is we don't have a government organization regulating us.

    LARRY KING: How many states allow it?

    BOB MEYROWITZ: There is not- it is really a technical question as to who allows it and who doesn't. If you have, as New York state has, a boxing and wrestling commission, technically, kick boxing, which takes place all the time in New York state and in many states, then is unregulated and technically, is not allowed. But-

    LARRY KING: So you could put this on in New York?

    BOB MEYROWITZ: We have.

    LARRY KING: You have? Can you put it on in any state you want to?

    BOB MEYROWITZ: We put it on in Buffalo. It was extremely successful there. We had no problems. We have never had one serious injury in two years.

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: They've just been prevented from having a fight, or event, in Brooklyn, after an event-

    BOB MEYROWITZ: The event was held.

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: -after an event was held in Charlotte, North Carolina, the next day, the Charlotte City Council voted a unanimous resolution never to allow anything like that in their city again.

    KEN SHAMROCK: It was the wrong event.

    LARRY KING: What do you mean?

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: This was an Ultimate Fighting thing, the same deal that you-

    KEN SHAMROCK: It's the wrong event.

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: -it's the same deal that you-

    KEN SHAMROCK: No, it's not.

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: -it's the same deal that you do.

    KEN SHAMROCK: No, it's not.

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: Yes, it is.

    KEN SHAMROCK: No, it is not.

    LARRY KING: What's the difference, Ken?

    KEN SHAMROCK: The difference is that we have professional fighters that come in there and these guys have been with the organization ever since it started. I've been fighting for four years. A lot of the people that they bring in, these like other organizations, they don't have the training physicians, they don't have the trained fighters, they bring people in that aren't professional. What we do is a professional show and like Bob Meyrowitz just said, we have professional physicians there, and they are checked before the fight, they are checked at the fight, and they are checked during the fight and we have one standing ringside, in case there is any injury in the ring, the physician steps inside the ring before the fighter leaves the ring, to make sure that there are no injuries-

    LARRY KING: On this-

    KEN SHAMROCK: -that are going to be serious.

    LARRY KING: -on this break, when we break, we are going to see a scene of Ken fighting. Do you know when this clip was from, Ken?

    KEN SHAMROCK: I am not sure which clip you are going to show. It's- I believe it's the Oleg Tackterov [sp?].

    LARRY KING: This is Superfight 7.

    KEN SHAMROCK: Yes, I believe that's Oleg Tackterov.

    LARRY KING: And where was this?

    KEN SHAMROCK: That was in Buffalo, New York.

    LARRY KING: All right, let's watch Ken Shamrock go at it, and we will continue and then your phone calls. Don't go away. Here's Ken.

    [Commercial break]

    LARRY KING: Still to come Garth Brooks. And don't forget, Saturday night, at 8:00, on TNT, a Larry King Special, on miracles. You will not want to miss this program. Saturday night, 8:00 on our sister network, TNT.

    Robert Meyrowitz, this is successful in Japan? It's successful in Europe, right?

    BOB MEYROWITZ: Yes. South America.

    LARRY KING: And it's been successful everywhere you have put it on in the United States?

    BOB MEYROWITZ: It is- in America, it is one of the most successful new Pay Per View franchises and I think it is also important to point out that it is on Pay Per View. This isn't something that just comes into everyone's home for free.

    LARRY KING: How many people watched the last event?

    BOB MEYROWITZ: The last one, we had 300,000 people bought it. And again-

    LARRY KING: How much?

    BOB MEYROWITZ: They paid $19.95.

    LARRY KING: How many matches?

    BOB MEYROWITZ: Seven matches that are televised.

    LARRY KING: What about- as a member of the free enterprise party, Sen. McCain? How can you answer: if people want to do it and people want to see it, that's capitalism.

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: I think it is. If you want to have a exhibition of Russian roulette, I guess, and best winner takes the money for one last inning. Let me tell you- let me tell you a quote from a guy who-

    BOB MEYROWITZ: This is a long way from Russian roulette.

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: -'I was hitting-', let me- from one of- from one of these combatants: 'I was hitting him to the brain stem, which is a killing blow. And when he covered up, I swing back, with upswings, to the eye sockets, with two knuckles and a thumb. There was no other place I could hurt him.' Now that's not- that's not- that's simply not appropriate.

    LARRY KING: The object is to maim, is it not Ken?

    KEN SHAMROCK: No, it's- no, it's not. I mean-

    LARRY KING: What is the object?

    KEN SHAMROCK: Well, I mean, you now, it's like any sport, you get guys out there, they are excited, they are hyped up, they are talking about knocking someone's head off, they are talking about doing this and doing that, but in actuality, when they get out there, it is not all about that. It's all about technique. It's all about a person going in there and wanting to win. And doing what it takes to win. And in this we have rules, there are some rules in there that are protecting people. There is a referee in there that knows exactly what is going on. And when a guy gets into a situation that he can be hurt, he will stop it. So I- you know-

    LARRY KING: But unlike wrestling, it is not show business, right? They are out to win?

    KEN SHAMROCK: No. But the- but he bottom line is, is that you've got professional wrestling, where the little kids don't see the difference between what we do, and what professional wrestling does. These guys are out there cutting themselves, and they are bleeding all over the place, and guys are stomping on them, and guys are jumping into the ring and beating them up and little kids are watching this. And they don't know that it is not real. To them it's real.

    LARRY KING: Yeah.

    KEN SHAMROCK: So, what's the difference?

    LARRY KING: Is there betting on- on your sport, Ken?

    KEN SHAMROCK: I- I don't know. I imagine that people bet somewhere out there, but like I said, I haven't heard anything in Reno or Vegas or any of that like that. But-

    LARRY KING: Marc, if someone put on an event- if Robert Meyrowitz put on an event in Vegas or Reno, could you stop it?

    MARC RATNER: Yes. Under our-

    LARRY KING: By what law?

    MARC RATNER: -under our purview, we only regulate what we call unarmed combat, and that means that if a person can inflict an injury on another, then it comes under our regulation and we refused to regulate this sport because of the violence involved. We have 36 states that belong to the Association of Boxing Commissions, which unanimously have agreed to not allow this form of fighting in their- in their states. Actually, Ken brought up a very good point. He said 'This wasn't our group.' And I think that's- what he meant by that, is that there are other copycats out there that aren't as regulated, maybe, as the Ultimate-

    LARRY KING: Mm-hm.

    MARC RATNER: -and there are becoming more of these around and it's going to get more violent, and somebody will get maimed in the ring.

    LARRY KING: Bob wanted to say something?

    BOB MEYROWITZ: Yeah. And, also, let me say, I have no problem with anybody who wants to regulate us and anyone who wants to say 'This is the rules,' that would be great, too. We're not opposed to that. But, it was interesting when Marc said- and I am not sure exactly what he was saying about why we couldn't do it in his state. If he was saying that-

    LARRY KING: They have a law.

    BOB MEYROWITZ: They have a law that says you can't-

    LARRY KING: What's the law, Marc?

    MARC RATNER: Our definition is unarmed combat is what we regulate. And our commission policy-

    BOB MEYROWITZ: Wouldn't boxing be unarmed combat?

    LARRY KING: The glove I guess is-

    BOB MEYROWITZ: It's the glove?

    BOB MEYROWITZ: A glove is an interesting point-

    KEN SHAMROCK: Yeah.

    BOB MEYROWITZ: -because if you want to protect a man's head, you put a helmet on him. If you want to protect the man's hand, you put a glove on the hand. A glove, a hand, is a much weaker bone than a headbone, you cannot strike someone to the head with an ungloved hand.

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: This is-

    BOB MEYROWITZ: With the glove you can do-

    MARC RATNER: Well, but I also see knees and elbows.

    LARRY KING: That's- you want to ground this Senator?

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: You see it's interesting, knees and elbows- isn't it interesting that someone like Floyd Patterson would say that this kind of contest is appalling and repugnant, the former heavyweight champion of the world?

    KEN SHAMROCK: Yeah-

    LARRY KING: Why are you-

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: Isn't-

    LARRY KING: -laughing, Ken?

    KEN SHAMROCK: Well, because it is kind of amazing. I went to a boxing match, in Palm Springs, and two- two people there that are very good fighters, and I enjoy boxing, and I like to watch boxing, but it's kind of curious that, you know, these people are taking shots to the head - and I am talking a minimum of 50-60 times, okay? - and it don't matter how you slice it or cut it or dice it, the bottom line is that the brain inside your head is bouncing off the walls inside your head, 50 to 60 times. So, to me, you are still, you're still- you're still boxing, you are still hitting that opponent, and they still have the same intent as any other sport, that is a contact sport, of knocking a man out-

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: Larry, let me just remark-

    KEN SHAMROCK: -or putting him down.

    LARRY KING: Yeah, let him talk. Ken, hold it. Senator, are you drawing a thin line here?

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: Let me just- Larry, if the appointed- if the appointed officials, that are supposed to regulate these sports, in 36 states, unanimously agree that this is an unacceptable business where someone is going to end up being maimed or seriously injured-

    KEN SHAMROCK: Well, why don't you stop boxing?

    LARRY KING: How about- hold it, hold it. How about Ken's point?

    KEN SHAMROCK: How come you don't stop boxing? There's been several-

    LARRY KING: Doesn't boxing fit that bill?

    KEN SHAMROCK: -people- yes, it does.

    LARRY KING: Hold it, hold it, Ken. Doesn't boxing-

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: Excuse me for talking while you are interrupting, sir.

    LARRY KING: Senator, doesn't boxing fit that thing?

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: No, it doesn't. Boxing is a regulated sport. Marc Ratner, for example, out in Las Vegas, where the biggest fights in the country take place on a regular basis, everyone knows that they are the most respected- would not touch this thing with a 10 foot pole. Ask him. Because that sooner or later someone is going to get very badly injured. And I also want to-

    KEN SHAMROCK: You mean like killed? You man like killed?

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: I- I-

    KEN SHAMROCK: Do you mean like killed?

    LARRY KING: Oh, his point is going to be boxers get killed.

    KEN SHAMROCK: Is that what you're saying?

    LARRY KING: Let me get a break and then we will come back. We will include your phone calls. We're discussing the Ultimate Fighting concept, and we urge you not to go away. Don't go away. We will be right back.

    [Commercial break]

    LARRY KING: Our guests are Robert Meyrowitz, creator of Ultimate Fighting Championship, the next big one Denver, December 16th, Sen. John McCain, the famed United States Senator, out of Arizona, Ken Shamrock, the Ultimate Fighter, a Superfight Champion, who will be a commentator at that Championship in Denver, and Marc Ratner, Executive Director, Nevada State Athletic Commission, President of the Association of Boxing Commissions.

    We're joined on the phone by my friend, actor, Robert Conrad, who I imagine has- if he has called in, he definitely has a thought on this.

    How are you, Bob?

    BOB CONRAD, Actor: Well, I'm- I'm unhappy to find out that I am a part of the lowest common denominator. I'm okay, Larry. Let me just say this to you. First of all, I want to congratulate Ken. I've been in martial arts- I introduced martial arts in this country in 1959, shotokan karate, on a show called Hawaiian Eye, I've been boxing since I'm six, and the only time I was- I was rendered unconscious, was by another fighter, not too long ago, named Tony Danza. And all of the martial arts, karate that I've done, I've walked out of the ring whole. This man, Ken, goes in there by his own choice. I am surprised, shocked, that John is involved in this. Balance the budget, John, and as far as Mr. Ratner is concerned, that turkey fight that was perpetrated by Don King between Mr. Tyson, that other man should have never been in the ring. He could have really gotten hurt if he ever would have fought.

    LARRY KING: Senator, what do you want to say to Mr. Conrad?

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: Nothing.

    BOB CONRAD: Also-

    LARRY KING: No comment?

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: No. I- I hope that he will watch one of these programs, as I watched part of it. If he is not appalled, we have nothing in common.

    LARRY KING: You know Bob Con- Bob, Sen. McCain was a great American hero, and he was held a war prisoner for a long time, so it is not that he is without guts here.

    BOB CONRAD: I- it's not a question of his courage. I think he was a pilot, and let me just say, I am a member of his party. But it is that federal legislating of how we live our lives, that I find to be unkind and unnecessary. If Ken wants to get into- into the ring, and compete, with another person willing, that's the American way. We don't need a senator telling us how to live our lives.

    LARRY KING: You don't want to pass a law on this, do you, though?

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: No, I have not introduced legislation. Thirty six-

    LARRY KING: So your concept is what?

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: -36 states have already outlawed it and it won't be long before all 50 do, because people are- every time they see one of these things, they are appalled, like the Charlotte City Council, like the Governor of Colorado.

    KEN SHAMROCK: How can you say that? How can you say that when it's- when it's one of the best Pay Per Views out there? How can you say that people want to close it down. It's the politicians that want to close it down, it's not the people. And the people are the guys that are the ones that you guys should be listening to. They are the ones that elect you.

    LARRY KING: Marc? Does the public- Marc, in your opinion, does the public want it?

    MARC RATNER: I don't know about in the state of Nevada. But I know that they have had some- they have done several shows where they have done Pay Per View in very good numbers. But the- the barbaric way of their fighting, trying to knee drop on a guy's face, or trying to really maim somebody, offends most of the people that I've certainly talked to in our state.

    KEN SHAMROCK: Oh, so what you're saying-

    BOB MEYROWITZ: Larry-

    KEN SHAMROCK: - so what you're- so what-

    BOB MEYROWITZ: -wait, wait. If I can- Ken? Ken?

    LARRY KING: Hold, Ken.

    BOB MEYROWITZ: Ken, there is a fact here. There is a fact. The fact is that nobody has been injured, seriously injured doing this Ultimate Fighting Championship.

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: Well, you've been very lucky.

    BOB MEYROWITZ: Not one.

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: You've been very, very lucky.

    BOB MEYROWITZ: That's an opinion. There is a fact. The fact is, no one has been injured. It's an opinion-

    LARRY KING: What elsewhere in the world? True elsewhere or-

    BOB MEYROWITZ: No, no. In-

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: It's interesting that-

    BOB MEYROWITZ: -never. In 65 years in Brazil of doing this, there has never been a serious injury.

    LARRY KING: Sixty five years?

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: It's interesting that- when one of these combatants signs- has to sign a paper that relieves our friend here of all responsibility.

    KEN SHAMROCK: That's with anything.

    LARRY KING: Hold on, Ken.

    KEN SHAMROCK: I mean, you've got to sign that when you come on here. Come on. I mean, you've got to- you always have to sign something.

    LARRY KING: No, no, no. You don't sign for this.

    We will get a break and come back and take some more phone calls.

    KEN SHAMROCK: Come on.

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: Isn't that right?

    LARRY KING: And then Garth Brooks will join us. This is Larry King Live. Don't go away.

    [Commercial break]

    LARRY KING: Let's get some more calls in. Seattle? Hello.

    1st CALLER, [Seattle, Washington]: Hello. I wanted to ask the Senator from Arizona, when we end up condoning this kind of brutality, where is the fine line between keeping this type of brutality out of other venues? And will it escalate and how- how will-

    LARRY KING: All right, the person dealing with Howard Stern, had trouble holding two successful thoughts together.

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: Okay. I just have- my only comment is that I think it is already clear that there are copycat things. There is a great deal of money involved here. By the way, off-camera, it was mentioned that both Marc and I were at the fight where Bobby Garcia was killed. It was a very tragic event. I think you could argue that the referee should have stopped the fight before. But there was a referee in the ring, and that referee was doing his best to see that he wasn't seriously injured.

    LARRY KING: But a man was killed.

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: Yes.

    LARRY KING: Corativa, Brazil? Hello?

    2nd CALLER, [Corativa, Brazil]: Hello. I've got a question to Ken Shamrock.

    LARRY KING: Sure.

    2nd CALLER: Ken, with all of these technical fighters, as Marco Ruiz, as [unintelligible] with all of these technical fighters, like these, be the powerful fighters as we have been seeing on the last two main fighters, fighting.

    LARRY KING: Did you get that question, Ken?

    KEN SHAMROCK: I guess- I got- I just- I'm having a hard time-

    LARRY KING: I guess it is how would these kind of fighters do against pro fighters?

    KEN SHAMROCK: Against boxers?

    LARRY KING: Yeah.

    KEN SHAMROCK: Well, it's been- in the Ultimate Fighting we've had a couple of boxers in there and they haven't done so well, but they weren't- they weren't championship boxers, guys like Mike Tyson or-

    LARRY KING: Yeah.

    KEN SHAMROCK: -Ivander Hollyfield. You know, those guys you never know. If they step in there, they could knock you out. But it- you will never know unless they do it. And-

    LARRY KING: How about the technical fighter against the bruiser in your sport?

    KEN SHAMROCK: Oh, well, a bruiser, he comes in, I guess he could do okay, but most of the times the technical fighter is going to win, and the guys that usually win the championship, have been the technical fighters.

    LARRY KING: Do you-

    KEN SHAMROCK: We haven't had a bruiser win one yet.

    LARRY KING: John, do you like karate?

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: Oh, I-

    LARRY KING: Do you like the martial arts?

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: Oh, yeah, I think they are fine.

    LARRY KING: You have no problems with-

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: Yes. I might add that Ben Nighthorse Campbell, who was an Olympic judo participant shares exactly my view and is very much opposed to this sort of thing.

    LARRY KING: There is- Bob, you must admit, when you look at this type of thing, I mean, everything goes but gouging.

    BOB MEYROWITZ: It- when-

    LARRY KING: That's kind of distasteful.

    BOB MEYROWITZ: The more you watch it, the more you begin to understand what everybody is doing. And so the more you watch it, the more you see technique, and it's interesting also to point out that we've never had a bruiser who has won, and that the winners are usually jiu jitsu, and wrestlers. So that it is not them ore violent, it is not the karate, or the tae kwon do, it is the jui jitsu that wins, and the lighter fighters. And I think that it is of particular importance when people want to study self defense, to really understand that those are the ways to win. And that the people who fight in this are most definitely highly skilled and very well-trained athletes.

    LARRY KING: Have we had opinions from people like Steven Segal or, Chuck Norris? Do you know if-

    BOB MEYROWITZ: I don't know.

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: I don't know.

    LARRY KING: Does anyone know?

    KEN SHAMROCK: Well, we've had Don 'the dragon' Wilson, and he likes it. And we've- you know, we've had quite a few celebrities there.

    LARRY KING: They like it.

    KEN SHAMROCK: Yeah, I mean they- they like it. They think it's you know, it's mano a mano, it's one on one, and we take precautions against people getting hurt. And that's why-

    LARRY KING: Let me get-

    KEN SHAMROCK: -we haven't had anybody hurt.

    LARRY KING: Let me get a few more calls in and then we will meet Garth Brooks and we will do that right after this.

    [Commercial break]

    LARRY KING: We're back with our remaining moments with Robert Meyrowitz, Ken Shamrock, Sen. John McCain, and Marc Ratner. Let's get some forecasts. What is going to happen to this sport, Bob?

    BOB MEYROWITZ: It is just growing and growing. Everything we do. Every time we do one it gets more and more viewers. The videos are selling extremely well. I think that people all over the country are beginning to respond to it. It has changed what people think of martial arts, it has changed the martial arts community. It is getting more and more exciting and there is almost no level - with the greatest respect to the Senator - no strata, of America, that isn't involved in Ultimate Fighting.

    LARRY KING: Is it a sad commentary?

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: I think it is a commentary on what's happening in America. But what I think is going to happen is that it is eventually going to go overseas, because 36 states don't allow it at all. And the other 14 I think will eventually-

    LARRY KING: But they- they can't prevent the Pay Per View from being watched, right?

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: No, and so I think it will probably go overseas and the Pay Per View will be-

    LARRY KING: You can pick it up there.

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: -at your local video, yeah.

    LARRY KING: But you plan- you plan no federal legislation?

    BOB MEYROWITZ: Is there anything you want to do? I mean, there seems to be no plan or no thought process here. What would you like?

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: I'd like to see it- I'd like to see the rules-

    BOB MEYROWITZ: What would you like?

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: I'd like to see it acceptable to those commissions, those athletic commissions that are appointed, who are tasked with the job of regulating all sporting events. And let it be acceptable to them. Then I think it would be acceptable to me.

    KEN SHAMROCK: How do you- how do you- how do you regulate the Ultimate Fighting Championships?

    BOB MEYROWITZ: What- what would you- what would you like- or have, that you- I mean-

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: I would ask Marc that question. Maybe he could answer it.

    LARRY KING: Marc can you write some rules for this sport?

    MARC RATNER: I don't know. Anytime you have somebody that is already on the ground, and you can- you can knee them in the face, or you can kick him when he is down, it doesn't seem like it's a sport to me. And I don't think we can regulate a sport like that.

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: Mmm.

    BOB MEYROWITZ: That's kind of curious-

    LARRY KING: Ken, what do you think is going to happen?

    KEN SHAMROCK: Well, you know, I- I see it growing. You know, the bottom line is, is that the people like it and the politicians want to ban it. And that's usually how our society goes, is because the politicians don't look to the people. The people are the ones that vote for them. I think they need to turn around and look at what is going on, maybe meet some of the fighters, see what kind of life they live. See what kind of people they are. Because I take it as an insult when they say that it's barbaric and that we're animals. And I- I- I get very angry when they say that, because they don't know me.

    LARRY KING: Marc, where do you think its going?

    MARC RATNER: I agree with Sen. McCain. I believe the few states that have had it, wiil regulate it out of existence. And you will see it go to South America or across the ocean.

    LARRY KING: Would you favor anything going, Bob? Cockfighting? Would you favor bullfights? Would you favor that?

    BOB MEYROWITZ: That question is not really relevant. No, in this-

    LARRY KING: It's competition.

    BOB MEYROWITZ: -in this case, no, I don't favor any of that. No. The martial arts-

    LARRY KING: So, you do favor drawing lines.

    BOB MEYROWITZ: -the martial arts is a sport.

    LARRY KING: What-

    BOB MEYROWITZ: And I think what people here don't realize and what Marc doesnt' appreciate and Sen. McCain doesn't appreciate, is that martial arts is a sport. A huge sport in America. There is nowhere in America where you can go and not see jujitsu, or tae kwon do, or a karate school. Kids are going, they are studying it. It's good for their-

    LARRY KING: But they're saying that's not this, right?

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: I was going to say, that every judo-

    BOB MEYROWITZ: Right. That's fine.

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: -match I have ever seen, and other karate, even kick boxing, there are rules-

    BOB MEYROWITZ: Well-

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: -and regulations. And this, you're- the object is to disable your-

    KEN SHAMROCK: How can you-

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: -opponent. And I am not sure-

    BOB MEYROWITZ: No, not true.

    KEN SHAMROCK: That's not true.

    LARRY KING: Fine, we will have to make up our minds for ourselves.

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: -that- after all, the-

    LARRY KING: I thank you all very much.

    Robert Meyrowitz, Ken Shamrock, Sen. John McCain, and Marc Ratner. And one quick thing, are you going to get a budget?

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: Not sure.

    LARRY KING: Not sure? Bosnia?

    Sen. JOHN McCAIN: I think we're going to probably get some kind of resolution that will help to minimize the risk and maximize the chance of success, at least I hope so.

    LARRY KING: Thank you very much. Thank you all very much for joining us..
    .
    .

    Copyright 1995 Cable News Network, Inc.

    FURTHER INFORMATION:

    The preceding text has been professionally transcribed. However, although the text has been checked against an audio track, in order to meet rigid distribution and transmission deadlines, it has not yet been proofread against videotape.

    The preceding text has been professionally transcribed. However, although the text has been checked against an audio track, in order to meet rigid distribution and transmission deadlines, it has not yet been proofread against videotape.


    PERSON: JOHN MCCAIN (84%);

    COUNTRY: UNITED STATES (94%); SOUTH AMERICA (79%); JAPAN (78%);

    STATE: ARIZONA, USA (91%); NEVADA, USA (79%);

    CITY: LAS VEGAS, NV, USA (77%);

    SUBJECT: CELEBRITIES (77%);

    LOAD-DATE: December 7, 1995

    LANGUAGE: ENGLISH
    Transcript # 1610
    TYPE: Show; Interview
    Copyright 1995 Cable News Network, Inc.
    ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
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    Now darkness comes; you don't know if the whales are coming. - Royce Gracie


    KosherKickboxer has t3h r34l chi sao

    In De Janerio, in blackest night,
    Luta Livre flees the fight,
    Behold Maeda's sacred tights;
    Beware my power... Blue Lantern's light!
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    USA TODAY

    March 11, 1994, Friday, FINAL EDITION
    Tough guy has 'feelings, too'

    BYLINE: Al Young; Ben Brown

    SECTION: SPORTS; Pg. 2C

    LENGTH: 407 words



    .
    .
    .

    Mixed mayhem
    Friday night's Ultimate Fighting Championships II from Denver is "the return of the world's only live, mixed-match, no-rules, bare-knuckles pay-per-view fighting competition," according to the event's adjective-rich producers at Semaphore Entertainment.
    The New York Times calls it "the decline of civilization . . . through the prism of pay-per-view."
    For $ 14.95, you can draw your own conclusions.
    Participating cable systems will air the heavyweight kickboxing champ of Utah, a couple of red sash holders in Kung Fu, several Tae Kwon Do black belts and an assortment of other martial artists who'll comprise the field of 16. The guy left standing gets $ 60,000.
    Royce Gracie, a Jiu Jitsu specialist from Brazil and winner of UFC 1, is back.
    Instead of rules, the competition has "suggestions:" No eye-gouging or biting. There are no rounds, no timeouts, no ties and no points.


    PERSON: NICK FOTIU (95%); MANON RHEAUME (93%);

    ORGANIZATION: NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE (84%); NEW YORK RANGERS (84%); NEW YORK RANGERS (84%); NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE (84%);

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    CITY: NASHVILLE, TN, USA (93%); NEW YORK, NY, USA (88%);

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    SUBJECT: PRO HOCKEY:MANON RHEAUME:NICK FOTIU:NASHVILLE KNIGHTS:PRO BOXING:BAREKNUCKLES BOXING:KICKBOXING: PAY FOR VIEW:TV SPORTS; HOCKEY; COACH; WOMEN; BOXING; CABLE TV; SPORTS & RECREATION (90%); SPORTS (90%); ICE HOCKEY (90%); ATHLETES (90%); WINTER SPORTS (90%); MARTIAL ARTS (89%); PAY PER VIEW (88%); BOXING (85%); SPORTS & RECREATION EVENTS (78%); TICKET SALES (69%); CABLE TELEVISION (64%);

    GRAPHIC: PHOTO, b/w, Marc Beaudin, AP

    SPORTS PEOPLE

    Copyright 1994 Gannett Company, Inc.
    Now darkness comes; you don't know if the whales are coming. - Royce Gracie


    KosherKickboxer has t3h r34l chi sao

    In De Janerio, in blackest night,
    Luta Livre flees the fight,
    Behold Maeda's sacred tights;
    Beware my power... Blue Lantern's light!
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    Business Wire
    September 13, 1996, Friday
    'Ultimate Fighting Championship XI' storms Augusta; martial arts phenomenon to air live on pay-per-view Sept. 20

    LENGTH: 859 words

    DATELINE: NEW YORK CITY



    Sept. 13, 1996--In the midst of the hurricane season, a new storm is hitting Augusta, Ga., with the coming of pay-per-view's exclusive "Ultimate Fighting Championship XI" to The Augusta/Richmond County Civic Center on Sept. 20, 1996. A true sports phenomenon that continues to set new pay-per-view audience records with each event. This three-hour, no-holds-barred, mixed martial arts tournament featuring seven elimination-style bouts is scheduled for 9 p.m. ET, with a pre-show scheduled to begin at 8:30 p.m.
    "What people love about the Ultimate Fighting Championship is that it's real," said Bob Meyrowitz, president/chief executive officer of SEG Sports Corp. and executive producer of the event. "These athletes have reached the top of their respective martial arts disciplines, and this is where they go to see who's the best of the best in direct, one-on-one combat."


    Among the competitors scheduled to enter the Octagon in hopes of winning the $ 50,000 purse are David "Tank" Abbott, a 6-foot, 300-pound pitfighter from Huntington Beach, Calif., who can bench-press more than 600 pounds. The controversial and outspoken Abbott has earned a reputation as the "bad boy" of the sport and is quickly transforming himself from a cult figure into a '90s anti-hero for the masses. Abbott is expected to be tested in the championship match by 6-foot-1, 255-pound newcomer Mark Coleman, a two-time national freestyle wrestling champion, Pan Am and World Games medalist, and a member of the 1992 Olympic team. A native of Columbus, Ohio, the powerful Coleman stunned the fighting world with his dramatic win over heavy favorite Don Frye in UFC IX last July.
    Other contestants include Abbott's first-round adversary, Sam Adkins, a 6-foot-3, 259-pound boxer from Houston; Coleman's first-round opponent, Julian Sanchez, a 6-foot-3, 290-pound kickboxer/wrestler from San Antonio, Texas; plus Jerry Bohlander, a 6-foot, 200-pound pancrase specialist from Fresno, Calif., who will meet Fabio Gurgel, a 6-foot-1, 220-pound jiu-jitsu master from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in the first round; and Brian Johnston, a 6-foot-4, 225-pound kickboxer/judo expert from San Jose, Calif., who will square off against Reza Nasri, a 6-foot, 198-pound combative arts fighter from Isfahan, Iran.
    "Abbott and Coleman are what the Ultimate Fighting Championship is all about," added Meyrowitz. "You've got one guy who's an Olympic wrestler and one who's basically a street brawler. Both guys are huge, powerful, smart fighters who will get into the Octagon and use every skill they've learned to get an edge -- and who will win? Abbott? Coleman? Will there be a new star to emerge? You never know, and that's what makes it so exciting."
    The three-hour show will be hosted by noted sports commentator Bruce Beck and Olympic Gold Medalist wrestler Jeff Blatnick. During the show, they will be joined by color commentator Don "The Dragon" Wilson, a successful martial arts expert who has gone on to star in more than 20 action movies.
    Other guest commentators will include UFC stars Dan Severn, Ken Shamrock and Don Frye. As with all UFC events, the referee will be fan favorite Big John McCarthy.
    The $ 1 million production is directed by Mark Lucas, who directed many segments for the Atlanta Olympics on NBC. Lighting design is by noted music industry pro Lee Rose. The Octagon and entrance sets were designed by movie director John Milius.
    The Ultimate Fighting Championship XI is an exclusive pay-per-view event that will be carried live to more than 30 million American homes through Request Television, Viewer's Choice, DirecTV, TVN and USSB. The suggested retail price for the pay-per-view event is $ 21.95. Tickets to the live event can be purchased through Ticketmaster at 706/828-7700 or at the County Civic Center box office.
    Launched in 1993, the Ultimate Fighting Championship not only created the sports combat category on pay-per-view; it has become the fastest-growing category in the medium. The concept of a mixed-discipline, martial arts fighting competition is based on established events that have been taking place safely in Europe, Japan and South America for several years.
    In addition to reaching 30 million homes in the United States, the competition is also broadcast internationally to Great Britain, Spain, France, Japan, China, Mexico and to countries throughout South America.
    The Ultimate Fighting Championship is produced by SEG Sports Corp., a wholly owned subsidiary of Semaphore Entertainment Group, which is a full-scale and highly innovative television production company that conceives, develops and markets creative entertainment programming, including music, sports and comedy, for pay-per-view, cable and network television.
    KH/np* CB/np JK/np

    CONTACT: Jensen Communications Inc.
    Michael Jensen, 818/585-9575
    Susan Stewart, 916/823-5962



    COUNTRY: UNITED STATES (92%); IRAN (79%); BRAZIL (69%); SOUTH AMERICA (51%);

    CITY: SAN JOSE, CA, USA (79%); HOUSTON, TX, USA (78%); RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL (69%); SAN ANTONIO, TX, USA (67%); NEW YORK, NY, USA (59%); COLUMBUS, OH, USA (53%);

    STATE: GEORGIA CALIFORNIA OHIO TEXAS


    COMPANY: PAN AM COMMUNICATIONS (53%);

    ORGANIZATION: MARTIAL-ARTS/CHAMPIONSHIP

    TICKER: BOX

    INDUSTRY: SPORTS ENTERTAINMENT
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    GEOGRAPHIC: GEORGIA CALIFORNIA OHIO TEXAS


    LOAD-DATE: September 14, 1996

    LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

    DISTRIBUTION: Sports Editors/Boxing Writers
    Copyright 1996 Business Wire, Inc.
    Now darkness comes; you don't know if the whales are coming. - Royce Gracie


    KosherKickboxer has t3h r34l chi sao

    In De Janerio, in blackest night,
    Luta Livre flees the fight,
    Behold Maeda's sacred tights;
    Beware my power... Blue Lantern's light!
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    NOTE TO SELF - MOAR GRAPPLE - GET A NORMAL HAIR CUT - REPEAT

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    Posted On:
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    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Off topice, but worth noting for 1st use of "U.F.C."


    The New York Times
    March 8, 1994, Tuesday, Late Edition - Final
    TV SPORTS;
    Death Is Cheap: Maybe It's Just $14.95

    BYLINE: By Richard Sandomir

    SECTION: Section B; Page 13; Column 6; Sports Desk

    LENGTH: 759 words



    Here's a statement you won't hear made by Don King, Seth Abraham, Dan Duva or any other pay-per-view sports purveyor: "I don't want anyone to die. It may be good for the buy rate. But I don't want anyone to die." Thus spoke Campbell McLaren, general manager of the Semaphore Entertainment Group, which on Friday will air "The Ultimate Fighting Championship II," a no-rules war among martial artists that could conclude in rigor mortis.


    For just $14.95! Yes, friends, beyond Wrestlemania! Beyond boxing! Beyond Tough Man (the amateur boxing event)! Pay-per-view (possible) death! The Ultimate Fighting Championship pits 16 martial arts experts in areas from jujitsu and kung fu to wing chun and pentcak silat in a one-night tournament without rules, gloves, rounds, breaks or timeouts, where punches, kicks, elbows, and chokes are encouraged, and winners are decided by surrender, a doctor's diagnosis or death.
    "No, we don't want death," McClaren says again, noting that Arnold Schwarzenegger's "Terminator 2" was more violent than "U.F.C."
    We're thankful for this: the event suggests competitors not bite or gouge eyes, which excludes Moe Howard from chasing the championship prize of $60,000.
    Action occurs in an octagonal pit ringed by a five-foot fence, designed by the director John Milius like the one in his film, "Conan the Barbarian."
    The pit is in Denver, situated in the only state lacking a boxing commission, making it the only place in the country able to stage such an event.
    When the first version was staged last November, about 100,000 people purchased the event, generating a profit for Semaphore, a television production company which staged for pay-per-view the Jimmy Connors-Martina Navratilova match.
    "I couldn't tell you if our main audience are martial artists or those who just like to watch people whack other people," McClaren said.
    Clearly, there's a bloodthirsty sucker born every minute. In its public relations material, U.F.C. boasts: "The ethos of the Roman colosseums is back -- with a bloody vengeance!" Watch out, Christians!
    ESPN isn't doing a preview show, which is a shame. Hearing Mel Kiper discourse on ninjitsu and taekwondo would be a hoot.
    Death did not visit any competitor in "U.F.C. I": one suffered a broken hand, another needed oxygen and another had two teeth kicked out of his mouth. Those teeth, of an overmatched sumo wrestler, flew over the announcers' heads.
    "These are all warriors and if you set yourself up as a warrior, here's a war for you," McLaren said. "These people are different than you and I."
    McLaren may be different from you and I. Or maybe pay-per-view is different from you and I. I'm not sure. We can chuckle about how cheap life has become, and how brutal this sort of "entertainment" is. Throw boxing into the mix and you can ask if that's a proper amusement for civilized folks. We can also argue about whether we're a civlized society.
    You get the sense that when you dip into promoting this sort of promise-of-blood sport, you're traveling along a different wavelength in a bizarro world, one that is merely a high-tech version of past brutalities. Ready for "The Inquisition I," for $49.95? Torquemada with color commentary.
    McLaren said: "I was pitched a Saudi Arabian execution. Twice a year, they do heads. We'd do it with a hidden camera. I passed. So did Dan Duva."
    Bless their tasteful little hearts.
    Jim Brown, the Hall of Fame running back, will provide analysis for "U.F.C. II," but his presence has another meaning. Public service announcements for his "Amer-I-Can" program, to curb urban violence, will air between matches.
    Are we seeing some irony? Certainly there is a paradox to pitching non-violence between segments of violence described by McLaren as "probably the most brutal event on television." In addition, two members of the Bloods and Crips gangs will handle production assignments.
    McLaren observes no irony here, noting that the philosophy here is akin to steering gang members into a local Y.M.C.A. to learn boxing, to channel the energy into a disciplined activity. Like U.F.C.? With no rules?
    "Ever hear of a drive-by kicking?" he asks. Ah, compassionate wit!
    The decline of western civilization can be viewed through the pay-per-view prism, from the Julius Erving-Kareem Abdul Jabbar one-on-one bomb to the idiotic Tough Man competition. From Howard Stern's New Year's Eve special to the Riddick Bowe-Michael Dokes title bout. From the Ultimate Fighting Championship II to . . . We'll see. It won't be pretty.


    CITY: DENVER, CO, USA (50%);

    COMPANY: SEMAPHORE ENTERTAINMENT GROUP (57%);

    GEOGRAPHIC: DENVER, CO, USA (50%);

    SUBJECT: MARITAL ARTS; TELEVISION; PAY TELEVISION MARTIAL ARTS (92%); SPORTS & RECREATION EVENTS (91%); BOXING (90%); SPORTS (90%); PAY PER VIEW (90%); TELEVISION INDUSTRY (88%); SPORTS & RECREATION (78%); AMATEUR SPORTS (78%); ENTERTAINMENT & ARTS (76%); TOURNAMENTS (76%); MOVIE INDUSTRY (69%); MOVIE & VIDEO PRODUCTION (69%); TELEVISION PROGRAMMING (67%); RELIGION (50%);

    PERSON: SANDOMIR, RICHARD ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER (55%); ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER (55%);

    LOAD-DATE: March 8, 1994

    LANGUAGE: ENGLISH
    Copyright 1994 The New York Times Company
    Now darkness comes; you don't know if the whales are coming. - Royce Gracie


    KosherKickboxer has t3h r34l chi sao

    In De Janerio, in blackest night,
    Luta Livre flees the fight,
    Behold Maeda's sacred tights;
    Beware my power... Blue Lantern's light!
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    NOTE TO SELF - MOAR GRAPPLE - GET A NORMAL HAIR CUT - REPEAT

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    Posted On:
    1/21/2010 10:55am

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     Style: Submission Grappling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    The Associated Press

    March 7, 1994, Monday, PM cycle
    John Larroquette's Dark Ride ... Opposite Roseanne

    BYLINE: By SCOTT WILLIAMS, AP Television Writer

    SECTION: Entertainment News

    LENGTH: 775 words

    DATELINE: NEW YORK



    .
    .
    .

    Elsewhere in television ...
    BLOOD, KNUCKLES AND PAY-PER-VIEW: Cable television's pay-per-view titan Semaphore Entertainment Group will present the return of the world's only live, mixed-match, no-rules, bare-knuckle fighting competition on Friday, March 11.
    "The Ultimate Fighting Championship II" - surely the acid test of our culture's ability to forgo good taste, gentleness and compassion in the name of entertainment - will consist of 16 fighters in an octagonal ring.
    The ring is "designed for no escape; each match will run until there is a designated winner - by means of knockout, surrender, doctor's intervention or death."


    PERSON: JOHN LARROQUETTE (99%); THOMAS RUGGLES PYNCHON JR (95%); JOHN HEMINGWAY (58%);

    COUNTRY: NORTH AMERICA (56%);

    CITY: SAINT LOUIS, MO, USA (56%);

    COMPANY: ROSEANNE'S LIFE (69%);

    SUBJECT: AP on TV-John Larroquette WRITERS & WRITING (90%); TELEVISION PROGRAMMING (78%);

    LOAD-DATE: March 7, 1994

    LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

    ADVANCED-DATE: March 4, 1994, Friday, PM cycle

    Copyright 1994 Associated Press
    All Rights Reserved
    Now darkness comes; you don't know if the whales are coming. - Royce Gracie


    KosherKickboxer has t3h r34l chi sao

    In De Janerio, in blackest night,
    Luta Livre flees the fight,
    Behold Maeda's sacred tights;
    Beware my power... Blue Lantern's light!
  9. Matt Phillips is offline
    Matt Phillips's Avatar

    NOTE TO SELF - MOAR GRAPPLE - GET A NORMAL HAIR CUT - REPEAT

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    Posted On:
    1/21/2010 10:58am

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     Style: Submission Grappling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Business Wire

    December 16, 1991, Monday
    Battle of the Champions Dec. 22, 1991

    LENGTH: 821 words

    DATELINE: SEA GATE, N.Y.



    The UWF International (A Japanese-based wrestling organization) is association with Braverman Productions will be bringing to national television in early 1992 the premier of the newest and most thrilling form of contact sport the American public has ever witnessed.
    Battle of the Champions will take place on Dec. 22, 1991 at Japan's newest 16,000-seat Sumo Arena, The Ryoguki Kokugikan.
    The event will feature world champion boxers and kickboxers matched against the awesome Japanese wrestling champions where each chosen champion will bring his own style of fighting into the ring. The battles will ultimately answer the question -- Can a great boxing champion and/or kickboxing champion beat a great wrestling champion?


    Mixed matches have been portrayed in Hollywood movies with great success for many years where different fighting styles and stars were pitted against one another. Portrayed by stars such as Jean Claude Van Damme, Chuck Norris, Stephen Siegal and the great Bruce Lee, the American public seems to support and enjoy such movies. What would happen if you took these fights off the screen and into the ring?
    The mixed match concept was attempted thrice before in the real world. Back in 1939, Jack Dempsey fought and defeated in one round, the well known wrestler Cowboy Luttrel. It was a legitimate matchup and fight as opposed to the two following mixed match events. The early 1950's had Jersey Joe Walcott in a fiasco match against wrestler Buddy Rogers. 1976 saw one of the most ballyhooed matches of all time. New York's Shea Stadium was sold out to witness both a TV simulcast from Tokyo which had Muhummad Ali facing Antonio Inoki and a live event at Shea where Andre The Giant was pitted against the Bayonne Bleeder, Chuck Wepner.
    The Ali/Inoki bout was a sham. The Giant against Wepner was enjoyable and laughable but totally devoid of any competitive nature...and still the lagging question remains to be answered...which art form...which champion can defeat the other in his own chosen sport?
    On Dec. 22, 1991, three UWF International Wrestling champions will enter into a legitimate fight against three diverse champions. Former WBC heavyweight world champ, Trevor Berbick will face Japan's No. 1 wrestling champion, Nobuhiko Takada. Present IBF world cruiserweight champion and four-time world kickboxing champ, James Warring will face Billy Scott and Vince Ross, Canadian kickboxing champion goes against Makoto Ohe.
    The UWF International has teamed up with Braverman Productions to present upcoming championship mixed matches in the United States in 1992.
    Present and former world champions in the sports of boxing and kickboxing will face off against UWF International wrestling champions from Japan.
    N.Y.-based promoter, Gary Braverman feels legitimate fights between mixed fighting champs can make for thrilling events and plans on bringing this new sport to the American public following the Tokyo event on Dec. 22.
    Ironically, Gary's father Al Braverman was Wepner's manager and was instrumental in working with Vince McMahon Jr. on the 1976 Shea Stadium event. Big Al is presently boxing director for Don King Productions and feels his son has a very viable sporting attraction in ''Battle of the Champions.''
    The event promises to be a thrilling series of competitive matches featuring some very recognizable names. Braverman has committments from Roberto Duran, Michael Dokes, Bonecrusher Smith and Jose Ribalta. Braverman plans on an April or May promotion. Projected sites would be New York's Madison Square Garden, Los Angeles' Forum or possible Atlantic City or Las Vegas.
    Braverman Productions plans on televising the Dec. 22 Tokyo event as a tape delay on a national pay-per-view system and then offer it to network TV either ABC, FOX or NBC so as to acquaint as many Americans as possible with this new sport.
    There will be no fun and games at Japan's new Sumo Arena on Dec. 22. This sport is very real and very dangerous. The results should well cast a light on the often asked questions -- Who could beat who? Which fighting sport will be victorious? -0- battle of the Champions

    10 Round Mixed Match Wrestler vs. Boxer Feature Match

    Japan's No. 1 Wrestling Champ Former Heavyweight Champ Nobuhiko Takada vs. Trevor Berbick (U.S.A.)

    10 Round Mixed Match Wrestler vs. Kickboxer Co-Feature

    USA Amateur Champ I.B.F. World Cruiserwt. Champ Billy Scott vs. James Warring (U.S.A.)

    East Meets West Submission Match Wrestler vs. Wrestler

    Japanese Champion Former World Champion Tamura vs. Bob Backlund (U.S.A.)

    10 Round Kickboxing Match U.W.F. Champ Canadian Kickboxing Champ Makoto Ohe vs. Vince Ross

    U.W.F. Champ vs. Gary Albright (U.S.A.)

    U.W.F. Champ vs. Tom Burton (U.S.A.)

    U.W.F. vs. U.W.F

    CONTACT: Braverman Productions, Sea Gate
    Nancy Kay, 718/237-0022 or 718/372-9413


    COUNTRY: UNITED STATES (95%); JAPAN (91%);

    CITY: TOKYO, JAPAN (73%);

    STATE: ALABAMA ALASKA ARIZONA ARKANSAS CALIFORNIA
    COLORADO CONNECTICUT DELAWARE FLORIDA GEORGIA
    HAWAII IDAHO ILLINOIS INDIANA IOWA KANSAS
    KENTUCKY LOUISIANA MAINE MARYLAND
    MASSACHUSETTS MICHIGAN MINNESOTA MISSISSIPPI
    MISSOURI MONTANA NEBRASKA NEVADA NEW HAMPSHIRE
    NEW JERSEY NEW MEXICO NEW YORK NORTH CAROLINA
    NORTH DAKOTA OHIO OKLAHOMA OREGON PENNSYLVANIA
    RHODE ISLAND SOUTH CAROLINA SOUTH DAKOTA TENNESSEE
    TEXAS UTAH VERMONT VIRGINIA WASHINGTON
    WEST VIRGINIA WISCONSIN WYOMINGALABAMA ALASKA ARIZONA ARKANSAS CALIFORNIA
    COLORADO CONNECTICUT DELAWARE FLORIDA GEORGIA
    HAWAII IDAHO ILLINOIS INDIANA IOWA KANSAS
    KENTUCKY LOUISIANA MAINE MARYLAND
    MASSACHUSETTS MICHIGAN MINNESOTA MISSISSIPPI
    MISSOURI MONTANA NEBRASKA NEVADA NEW HAMPSHIRE
    NEW JERSEY NEW MEXICO NEW YORK NORTH CAROLINA
    NORTH DAKOTA OHIO OKLAHOMA OREGON PENNSYLVANIA
    RHODE ISLAND SOUTH CAROLINA SOUTH DAKOTA TENNESSEE
    TEXAS UTAH VERMONT VIRGINIA WASHINGTON
    WEST VIRGINIA WISCONSIN WYOMING

    COMPANY: BATTLE-OF-CHAMPIONS

    ORGANIZATION: BATTLE-OF-CHAMPIONSBATTLE-OF-CHAMPIONS

    GEOGRAPHIC: ALABAMA ALASKA ARIZONA ARKANSAS CALIFORNIA
    COLORADO CONNECTICUT DELAWARE FLORIDA GEORGIA
    HAWAII IDAHO ILLINOIS INDIANA IOWA KANSAS
    KENTUCKY LOUISIANA MAINE MARYLAND
    MASSACHUSETTS MICHIGAN MINNESOTA MISSISSIPPI
    MISSOURI MONTANA NEBRASKA NEVADA NEW HAMPSHIRE
    NEW JERSEY NEW MEXICO NEW YORK NORTH CAROLINA
    NORTH DAKOTA OHIO OKLAHOMA OREGON PENNSYLVANIA
    RHODE ISLAND SOUTH CAROLINA SOUTH DAKOTA TENNESSEE
    TEXAS UTAH VERMONT VIRGINIA WASHINGTON
    WEST VIRGINIA WISCONSIN WYOMINGALABAMA ALASKA ARIZONA ARKANSAS CALIFORNIA
    COLORADO CONNECTICUT DELAWARE FLORIDA GEORGIA
    HAWAII IDAHO ILLINOIS INDIANA IOWA KANSAS
    KENTUCKY LOUISIANA MAINE MARYLAND
    MASSACHUSETTS MICHIGAN MINNESOTA MISSISSIPPI
    MISSOURI MONTANA NEBRASKA NEVADA NEW HAMPSHIRE
    NEW JERSEY NEW MEXICO NEW YORK NORTH CAROLINA
    NORTH DAKOTA OHIO OKLAHOMA OREGON PENNSYLVANIA
    RHODE ISLAND SOUTH CAROLINA SOUTH DAKOTA TENNESSEE
    TEXAS UTAH VERMONT VIRGINIA WASHINGTON
    WEST VIRGINIA WISCONSIN WYOMING

    LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

    DISTRIBUTION: Sports Editors/Boxing & Wrestling Writers

    Copyright 1991 Business Wire Inc.
    Now darkness comes; you don't know if the whales are coming. - Royce Gracie


    KosherKickboxer has t3h r34l chi sao

    In De Janerio, in blackest night,
    Luta Livre flees the fight,
    Behold Maeda's sacred tights;
    Beware my power... Blue Lantern's light!
  10. Matt Phillips is offline
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    NOTE TO SELF - MOAR GRAPPLE - GET A NORMAL HAIR CUT - REPEAT

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    Posted On:
    1/21/2010 11:00am

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     Style: Submission Grappling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    This addresses a point I wanted to make earlier: In sports, the traditional meaning of "mixed match" is male/female as in "mixed doubles"

    United Press International

    November 6, 1982, Saturday, AM cycle
    SECTION: Domestic News

    LENGTH: 155 words

    DATELINE: SACRAMENTO, Calif.



    Shirley ''Zebra Girl'' Tucker will be able to climb into the ring as a 120-pound boxer and go 10 rounds with men under a reluctant ruling of the California Athletic Commission.
    ''We had no recourse but to approve it,'' said Don Fraser, commission executive officer, said of mixed matches.


    The five-member board decided Friday to approve women versus men professional boxing matches, effective immediately. The legality of mixed boxing was argued by the American Civil Liberties Union.
    ''To my knowledge there is only one woman boxer interested in fighting men -- and that's Shirley Tucker of Santa Rosa, (Calif.), who is in the 120-pound division,'' Fraser said.
    The mixed bouts may be difficult to come by, however.
    Fraser said he didn't know of any men who were willing to fight women in the ring and any mixed sparring sessions would have to be watched by commission officials before approval of the mixed bout.


    ORGANIZATION: AMERICAN CIVIL LIBERTIES UNION (56%); AMERICAN CIVIL LIBERTIES UNION (56%);

    COUNTRY: UNITED STATES (91%);

    STATE: CALIFORNIA, USA (91%);

    CITY: SACRAMENTO, CA, USA (79%);

    COMPANY: AMERICAN CIVIL LIBERTIES UNION (56%); AMERICAN CIVIL LIBERTIES UNION (56%);

    SUBJECT: BOXING (91%); SPORTS (91%); APPROVALS (90%); SPORTS GOVERNING BODIES (90%); HUMAN RIGHTS ORGANIZATIONS (70%);

    LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

    Copyright 1982 U.P.I.
    Now darkness comes; you don't know if the whales are coming. - Royce Gracie


    KosherKickboxer has t3h r34l chi sao

    In De Janerio, in blackest night,
    Luta Livre flees the fight,
    Behold Maeda's sacred tights;
    Beware my power... Blue Lantern's light!
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