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  1. Larus marinus is offline
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    Banzai Buddy

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    Posted On:
    1/05/2010 12:29am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Nothing - yet

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Sounds as though he's basically applied his philosophy on Aikido, as described here

    http://www.kazeutabudokai.com/phpBB3...php?f=49&t=674

    to his Judo. He wants his guys to know the beauty that is the deadly - but believes (or is pandering to those that believe) that the deadly can and should be attained without taking the knocks along the way. Nothing new, aside from his choice of art, really...
      #21
  2. 1point2 is online now
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    Posted On:
    1/05/2010 12:43am

    Join us... or die
     Style: 剛 and 柔

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Sorry, one more. Guy showed up to the judoforum.

    http://JudoForum.com/index.php?s=&sh...dpost&p=539713
    What a disgrace it is for a man to grow old without ever seeing the beauty and strength of which his body is capable. -Xenophon's Socrates
      #22
  3. Just Guess is offline

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    Posted On:
    1/05/2010 2:06am


     Style: ukemi & tapping out

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I found this little quote to be interesting.

    http://www.windsongdojo.com/judo/judo.html
    Where many schools both in Japan and in America have earned a nasty reputation concerning harsh teaching methods and high injury rates, at Windsong, we agree with Mr. Kano's vision, and believe in taking care of and responsibility for our partners, their safety, and their well-being.
    I don't think Japanese Judo dojo's have ever had a reputation for being nice easy places to train. While Judo didn't have the drop out rate from injuries that Jujutsu schools had, the early Kodokan was known for producing really effective fighters. You don't do that by taking it easy, and plenty of people that have trained in Japan have said that their secret to success and technical mastery is all due to a lot of hard work.
      #23
  4. Tom .C is offline

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    Posted On:
    1/05/2010 7:58am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Aikido,Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I have had the chance to be on the mat with some of their people. I thought they were very, very good. Strong in newaza as well. I don't know much about their school but the students I met seemed better than good.
      #24
  5. stray_bullet is offline
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    Posted On:
    1/05/2010 9:42am


     Style: Inactive

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    A black belt from Karl Geiss' lineage trains jiu-jitsu at the school that I attend, from what I recall when I was still training jiu-jitsu was that he was a very technical player and was able to attain blue belt in a strictly skill based school very quickly (I'm not quite sure about the exact time frame but I am certain it was six months at most), at the time he was a shodan in Judo. He also had a jiu-jitsu oriented tachi-waza class that he taught at the school; he taught from a very laid-back, gentleman's judo sort of approach and much of what I was able to retain was because of tips that he gave me during practice.

    The Windsong website makes the technical approach sound kind of arrogant and maybe a bit ignorant too but from what I've seen from another student from the Karl Geis organization the performance on the mat was good.
      #25
  6. Res Judicata is offline

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    Posted On:
    1/05/2010 9:48am


     Style: Judo & BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Larus marinus View Post
    Yeah, it does read a bit like that...

    How's about this? I don't know a lot about Judo, so this may be a perfectly fair and legit statement (if so, my bad) - but it sounds at odds with what I've read elsewhere when it comes to resistance levels in Judo and kinda screams 'ukes flying through the air like swallows in the springtime' at me... (bolding mine)
    This is actually a well thought out and pretty traditional Judo pedagogy with steadily increasing resistance. Aside from the de-emphasis of randori it's not all that unusual, I think. And I imagine they develop quite fluid technique. The drill they call sutegeiko is a fantastic learning tool. I've done all of those things in Judo -- and their equivalent in BJJ (e.g. flow rolling, I go/you go drills, etc.). You don't have to beat the crap out of each other all of the time - and it can be detrimental to do so.
      #26
  7. Lu Tze is offline

    BJJ might make you a better ground fighter, but Judo will make you a better dancer.

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    Posted On:
    1/06/2010 1:04pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Don't see a problem personally. They de-emphasise randori a bit too much for my taste, but it's not like all they do is static drills, I wish my school actually did more nage-komi.
      #27
  8. 1point2 is online now
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    Posted On:
    1/06/2010 1:10pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: 剛 and 柔

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Lu Tze View Post
    Don't see a problem personally. They de-emphasise randori a bit too much for my taste, but it's not like all they do is static drills, I wish my school actually did more nage-komi.
    I agree somewhat. As far as I can tell from their forum and judoforum posts, they don't let people randori until brown belt or so, and even then it's sparingly. No shiai at all. Then again, I like their sutegeitko exercise, and moving nagekomi is awesome.

    Not somewhere I'd train, but they've got their thing.
    What a disgrace it is for a man to grow old without ever seeing the beauty and strength of which his body is capable. -Xenophon's Socrates
      #28
  9. hungryjoe is online now
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    Posted On:
    7/11/2011 11:06pm

    supporting member
     Style: judo hiatus

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Somehow missed this thread when it was running.

    I was a member of Windsong until about a decade ago. At the time, Nick Lowry was still affiliated with Karl Geis' Fugakukai. I understand there has been a split and Nick has gone his own way. Haven't inquired as to the split and won't unless someone volunteers.

    My rank when leaving was yonkyu in Judo and shodan in Aikido. Can't remember just how long that took, but typical training was aikido four mornings a week and three of judo. Doubled up on Saturdays for the judo and aikido. Must admit, I did not start the judo until later while there.

    Judo rank did not carry over as it was dojo promoted only through the Fugakukai. My coach also started at Windsong many years before myself. He's currently sandan and would, if he was to appear on this site, give nothing but good words for Nick Lowery and his judo.

    Greg Ables, the uke in the video linked is also an extremely well rounded/talented player and did compete. Competition or not was up to the individual.

    Karl Geis trained directly under Tomiki while in Japan and was asked to teach his art in the US. We did randori on Fridays only if I remember correctly (aikido).

    I will say that Nick's kuzushi is phenomenal. He is also one of the finest persons I've ever met and not a bullshit bone in his body.

    Back then, we did randori below brown belt. There was always emphasis on taking care of your training partner. You rolled as hard as you wanted and attitudes were not tolerated.

    Added - that tatami is second to none in this state. Spring loaded with automotive valve springs and interlaced layers of wood, topped by a dense mat and covered with canvas. A true thing of beauty.

    In my opinion, this does not belong in MABS.
      #29
  10. PXM is offline

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    Posted On:
    7/12/2011 7:16am


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I was there when a shoulder was disarticulated
    I just think that's a funny way of proving how desensitized you are to pain.

    I'm sure when I was in hospital for a week after my third concussion or when I twisted my knee so the toe pointed backwards (they're the best stories from my pathetically sheltered life so shut up) the people around me felt stronger and tougher for having witnessed me unconscious for the 20 minutes it took the ambulance to arrive.
      #30
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