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  1. dig7six is offline

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    Posted On:
    12/29/2009 5:01am

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Whatever works.

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    What are you looking at ?

    Was hoping to pic some of the boxers brains or anyone who has spent a fair amount of time actually dodging punches intended to make contact.

    Where do you seem to focus your eyes to best pick up blows ? I personally have tried to look along the colar bone/middle chest and was just wondering if anyone had some tips to share on this and "drills" to help develop this and peripheral vision.

    Thank you.
  2. mcj1013 is offline

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    Posted On:
    12/29/2009 5:45pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    No matter what your martial art, you always keep your gaze locked into your opponent's eyes. You'll be able to catch them glancing where they want to throw they're punches if they're not careful, but make sure you're not doing the same.
  3. Barabbas is offline

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    Posted On:
    12/29/2009 6:44pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Drunken Judo

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Nemoj mi se priječit!
  4. dig7six is offline

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    Posted On:
    12/29/2009 9:23pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Whatever works.

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by mcj1013 View Post
    No matter what your martial art, you always keep your gaze locked into your opponent's eyes. You'll be able to catch them glancing where they want to throw they're punches if they're not careful, but make sure you're not doing the same.
    Firstly thanx for your response. I can understand the logic behind this, but a few things come to mind. I guess firstly the "energy" of "street fights" seem to in my experiance anyway not have a sparring or actual maintaining of boxing/kicking range where the idea of watching for your opponents eyes to be zeroing in on his targets could be implemented, seems things quickly clash into "clinching" range and the rush of getting the fight over and then getting down the road takes priority over an actual exchange of skill at that range.

    Also with fights taking place at night, might make this a little difficult and i would imagine quite a bit of skill and focus in a already stressful situation.

    I dont think i look to my targets before striking them, i more or less have a "sense" or a "feel" for where they are...im not pinpointing persay,so i dont think id be giving up the goods with my eyes, but thanx for the heads up.

    Maybe i should have prefaced my OP with the context of "street fighting", but truthfully didnt think of it and im sure that influenced your anwser..so sorry bout that.
  5. 1point2 is online now
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    Posted On:
    12/29/2009 10:13pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: 剛 and 柔

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    What do you yayas train? "Whatever works." is not an answer.

    Because the simple answer is either a quick "center of mass" or "collarbone" or, best yet, "ask your instructor." And mcj seems to think training from DVDs is awesome.

    I look at the upper sternum or neck. But I'm not an authority on MT or boxing.
    What a disgrace it is for a man to grow old without ever seeing the beauty and strength of which his body is capable. -Xenophon's Socrates
  6. dig7six is offline

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    Posted On:
    12/29/2009 11:14pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Whatever works.

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Kris Kringle-Jime View Post
    What do you yayas train? "Whatever works." is not an answer.

    Because the simple answer is either a quick "center of mass" or "collarbone" or, best yet, "ask your instructor." And mcj seems to think training from DVDs is awesome.

    I look at the upper sternum or neck. But I'm not an authority on MT or
    boxing.
    I have training in Jkd, which was when i was in my early teens. My actual "ranking" would be 1st Kyu in Goju Ryu.

    Im pretty fortunate that my instructor in( Goju) has always been a outside of the box thinker, he holds purple under Rickson etc..so it hasnt been a by the books investigation of Goju and Goju alone.

    While i do study and respect the tradiotion of my Goju training we always try to keep things geared tord streetfighting and training in an alive manner with a ground game..so it kinda is a "whatever works".

    Ive supplemented my training with vids and training partners etc, but official rank and style would be as mentioned above.
  7. Beorn is offline

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    Posted On:
    12/30/2009 1:53am


     Style: TKD, judo, MT noob

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    the correct response is the chest. always the chest. Just like a football player should always watch the hips, because thats where the body is going, so should a fighter watch the chest, because if thats moving, their fists are moving. Also, looking at the center of the chests allows your peripheral vision to pick up the movement of their hips, which allows you to see kicks coming
  8. Sang is offline
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    Posted On:
    12/30/2009 2:02am


     Style: MMA, Yoga

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    A lot of people will look where they are aiming their next shot which is probably a bad idea but i find myself doing this sometimes too. This leads into a nice feint where you look them straight in the eyes while throwing a leg kick or glance down right before kicking them in the head.

    The way i was taught to look at people is out of your peripherals while looking between your opponents shoulders. Since i'm so much taller than most people i often just end up looking at their head.
    "Boxing is the art of hitting an opponent from the furthest distance away, exposing the least amount of your body while getting into position to punch with maximum leverage and not getting hit."
    Kenny Weldon
  9. GenericUnique is offline

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    Posted On:
    12/30/2009 8:15am


     Style: WMA Lichtenauer Longsword

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I was told to look past your opponent's shoulder, so you didn't give away anything by focussing on a part of him, and to help minimize concious decision making by letting yourself just react to peripheral movement (I mostly study German longsword, so it's usually either in the bind and therefore working by feel, or at a longer range than most martial arts). I can't say I do that all the time in sparring, but I try to.
  10. Whathappened is offline

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    Posted On:
    12/30/2009 8:54am


     Style: Wing Chun Kuen

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by dig7six View Post
    ...some tips to share on this and "drills" to help develop this and peripheral vision.

    Thank you.
    I can only advise on this.
    Here are the steps I used to develop functional peripheral vision:
    • Load up a car racing game
    • Fix eyes off-center while being able to see the car peripherally.
    • Complete race course
    • Lower racing time
    • Rinse and repeat for each side of peripheral vision (8 sides, although, left and right peripheral vision is good enough for most folks)
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