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  1. slideyfoot is offline
    slideyfoot's Avatar

    Artemis BJJ Co-Founder/Instructor

    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Bristol, UK
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    2,489

    Posted On:
    10/26/2009 5:35am

    Business Class Supporting Membersupporting member
     Artemis BJJ | Brazilian Jiu Jitsu in Bristol Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    My generic response to the "what DVDs" question is:

    I'm only a blue belt, so still a relative beginner. Keeping that in mind, these are the sets I've found useful so far, grouped by the levels I think they're best suited for:

    For beginners:

    Blue Belt Requirements (full review here): a superb summary of the fundamental techniques and principles of Brazilian jiu jitsu. Roy Dean is both eloquent and thorough, walking you through each technique while emphasising important details, before repeating the movement from multiple angles. In my opinion, this should be the first instructional DVD you buy.


    After that:

    Cesar Gracie (full review here): this will provide you with some progression from the fundamentals you'll learn from Roy Dean, as well as reviewing those same basics. He is especially good on offensive combinations, rounding out the material from Dean's DVD. Its a bit older, dating back to 1999, but still an excellent piece of work: Cesar has a very detailed style, taking great care to talk you through everything he does.

    You could also try:

    Renzo/Kukuk (full review here): this hasn't stood up as well as Cesar Gracie's offering, originally hitting the market way back in 1994. Still, Renzo and Kukuk's teaching is great, made even more accomplished by coupling it with vale tudo footage, showing you the application under pressure. It is also cheap: for example, you can currently pick it up here for $42, which is very worth it considering you get five hours of instruction. One thing to keep in mind is that this does look dated when it comes to guard passing and takedowns: that last forty minutes should be taken with a very large pinch of salt.

    Pedro Carvalho (full review here): similarly to Renzo/Kukuk, this one shows its age (from 1996), but again much of the material remains relevant. Carvalho has some silly stuff in there, like gun defence, but like Cesar Gracie, he also links up some handy attacking combinations. Fast-paced teaching style, so could be to your taste if you like lots of techniques in a short space of time without too much talking (which is also true of Renzo/Kukuk). As with all the older DVDs, this can be found cheap.

    Around blue belt:

    Jiu Jitsu Revolution (full review here): Saulo's first set is fantastic. He is meticulously detailed, taking a concept-heavy approach to all the major positions in BJJ. Multiple angles and methodical progression mean these DVDs are perfect for refining your understanding of the sport, with an entire game laid out over the course of six hours.

    However, I would not recommend this as your first purchase (I'd continue to suggest Roy Dean for the absolute beginner). There is an implicit assumption throughout the set that you already understand the fundamentals: what Saulo presents are modifications, improvements and alternatives to those basics. Therefore I'd suggest that this works best for those who have recently got their blue belt, or are fast approaching that level.

    Science of Jiu Jitsu (full review here): The main selling point of Maia's set is the conceptual approach promised by the title. To an extent, Maia delivers on that promise: more than the techniques, it is the principles you will most likely remember after watching these DVDs. Those principles recur throughout, aided by well-presented instruction, multiple angles and insightful details.

    Like Jiu Jitsu Revolution this set is best suited to those around the blue belt level rather than absolute beginners, because both Saulo and Maia assume you already have a grasp of the basics. Unlike Saulo, Maia does not present a complete game, instead focusing in depth on particular aspects of a position, like escaping side control and defending against the pass, or even specific submissions, like the triangle and the omoplata.

    After that, the obvious next step is this:

    Purple Belt Requirements (full review here): Roy Dean provides a conceptual approach for the aspiring purple belt, with the intention of helping you learn the essential principle of combining techniques. Dean aims to assist the viewer in developing their own personal game, presenting several possible options. Note that this is not suitable for beginners, as the instruction is fast-paced, with the assumption is that you already have a solid grasp of the basics. This set shows how to bring it all together, so if you lack the relevant tools, this set will be far less useful to you.

    Alternately, if you are only interested in self defence:

    Gracie Combatives (full review here): If you're looking for a basic self defence course and don't care about belts, then Gracie Combatives would be an excellent choice. The instruction is superb, with an unprecedented level of detail, sometimes taking over thirty minutes exploring a single technique. This is an impressive production, right down to the smooth camera transitions from overhead shots into zooms and multiple angles. Even for those who are already training at a BJJ school and aren't interested in self-defence, several of the lessons are so good you'll still find them beneficial.

    However, the online blue belt test detailed on the last DVD remains controversial, as does some of the philosophy put forward in the course. For example, Rener Gracie states that there is no need to cross-train striking, a highly debateable question when it comes to self-defence. Geoff Thompson, a very respected self defence instructor, would almost certainly disagree. So, take the theory and marketing with a pinch of salt, but if you want self defence with top notch instruction, you won't be disappointed.

    For the average BJJ student, I'd recommend Roy Dean's Blue Belt Requirements, but for those with an interest in self defence, Gracie Combatives is the best I've ever seen.



    As you mentioned books too, that means I can stick up this:

    Mastering Jujitsu (full review): The first BJJ book you should buy. Best coverage of BJJ history and theory available, with thoughts on strategy, and a few basic techniques.

    The Guard (full review): Essential reading. Goes from beginner to slightly more advanced, keeping techniques in context. Lots of photos, multiple angles, concise and helpful descriptions.

    Jiu Jitsu University (full review): The first two chapters are ideal for beginners, with Saulo helpfully breaking down defence into survival and escapes. He methodically details how to work your way free, as well as common misconceptions. Later coverage of guard fundamentals is also good, with simple sweeps and submissions again described alongside typical problems.

    Passing the Guard (full review): Everything you could ever want to know about passing the guard is covered in this book. Opening the guard from standing or kneeling, dealing with grips, countering submissions, beating the lockdown, solo drills and of course a huge number of different passes are all present. I have some reservations about the inclusion of dubious (not to mention dangerous) techniques like neck cranks, but that aside, this book is awesome.

    Strategic Guard (full review): Slightly more advanced than The Guard, but even better in terms of presentation, coverage and textual description. Useful flow-charts at the end of each chapter. If you're looking for defensive applications of the guard and escapes, absolute must-have.

    BJJ: Theory and Technique (full review): Plenty of solid technique, but erratic layout and a focus on self-defence. Good for beginners if you don't mind flicking back and forth to find what you want. Also has a very good historical and theoretical introduction, but the one in Mastering Jujitsu is better.

    Mastering the Rubber Guard (full review): Well-presented coverage of Bravo's bottom game, but not for beginners. I'd recommend you don't pick this up until later on, certainly not before blue.
  2. Rene "Zendokan" Gysenbergs is offline
    Rene "Zendokan" Gysenbergs's Avatar

    fist first Philosopher

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    Sanctuary of Pallas Athena (Belgium)
    Posts
    2,642

    Posted On:
    10/26/2009 6:17am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Savate (LBF/SD/LC) - BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by slideyfoot View Post
    My generic response to the "what DVDs" question is:

    I'm only a blue belt, so still a relative beginner. Keeping that in mind, these are the sets I've found useful so far, grouped by the levels I think they're best suited for:

    For beginners:

    Blue Belt Requirements (full review here): a superb summary of the fundamental techniques and principles of Brazilian jiu jitsu. Roy Dean is both eloquent and thorough, walking you through each technique while emphasising important details, before repeating the movement from multiple angles. In my opinion, this should be the first instructional DVD you buy.


    After that:

    Cesar Gracie (full review here): this will provide you with some progression from the fundamentals you'll learn from Roy Dean, as well as reviewing those same basics. He is especially good on offensive combinations, rounding out the material from Dean's DVD. Its a bit older, dating back to 1999, but still an excellent piece of work: Cesar has a very detailed style, taking great care to talk you through everything he does.

    You could also try:

    Renzo/Kukuk (full review here): this hasn't stood up as well as Cesar Gracie's offering, originally hitting the market way back in 1994. Still, Renzo and Kukuk's teaching is great, made even more accomplished by coupling it with vale tudo footage, showing you the application under pressure. It is also cheap: for example, you can currently pick it up here for $42, which is very worth it considering you get five hours of instruction. One thing to keep in mind is that this does look dated when it comes to guard passing and takedowns: that last forty minutes should be taken with a very large pinch of salt.

    Pedro Carvalho (full review here): similarly to Renzo/Kukuk, this one shows its age (from 1996), but again much of the material remains relevant. Carvalho has some silly stuff in there, like gun defence, but like Cesar Gracie, he also links up some handy attacking combinations. Fast-paced teaching style, so could be to your taste if you like lots of techniques in a short space of time without too much talking (which is also true of Renzo/Kukuk). As with all the older DVDs, this can be found cheap.

    Around blue belt:

    Jiu Jitsu Revolution (full review here): Saulo's first set is fantastic. He is meticulously detailed, taking a concept-heavy approach to all the major positions in BJJ. Multiple angles and methodical progression mean these DVDs are perfect for refining your understanding of the sport, with an entire game laid out over the course of six hours.

    However, I would not recommend this as your first purchase (I'd continue to suggest Roy Dean for the absolute beginner). There is an implicit assumption throughout the set that you already understand the fundamentals: what Saulo presents are modifications, improvements and alternatives to those basics. Therefore I'd suggest that this works best for those who have recently got their blue belt, or are fast approaching that level.

    Science of Jiu Jitsu (full review here): The main selling point of Maia's set is the conceptual approach promised by the title. To an extent, Maia delivers on that promise: more than the techniques, it is the principles you will most likely remember after watching these DVDs. Those principles recur throughout, aided by well-presented instruction, multiple angles and insightful details.

    Like Jiu Jitsu Revolution this set is best suited to those around the blue belt level rather than absolute beginners, because both Saulo and Maia assume you already have a grasp of the basics. Unlike Saulo, Maia does not present a complete game, instead focusing in depth on particular aspects of a position, like escaping side control and defending against the pass, or even specific submissions, like the triangle and the omoplata.

    After that, the obvious next step is this:

    Purple Belt Requirements (full review here): Roy Dean provides a conceptual approach for the aspiring purple belt, with the intention of helping you learn the essential principle of combining techniques. Dean aims to assist the viewer in developing their own personal game, presenting several possible options. Note that this is not suitable for beginners, as the instruction is fast-paced, with the assumption is that you already have a solid grasp of the basics. This set shows how to bring it all together, so if you lack the relevant tools, this set will be far less useful to you.

    Alternately, if you are only interested in self defence:

    Gracie Combatives (full review here): If you're looking for a basic self defence course and don't care about belts, then Gracie Combatives would be an excellent choice. The instruction is superb, with an unprecedented level of detail, sometimes taking over thirty minutes exploring a single technique. This is an impressive production, right down to the smooth camera transitions from overhead shots into zooms and multiple angles. Even for those who are already training at a BJJ school and aren't interested in self-defence, several of the lessons are so good you'll still find them beneficial.

    However, the online blue belt test detailed on the last DVD remains controversial, as does some of the philosophy put forward in the course. For example, Rener Gracie states that there is no need to cross-train striking, a highly debateable question when it comes to self-defence. Geoff Thompson, a very respected self defence instructor, would almost certainly disagree. So, take the theory and marketing with a pinch of salt, but if you want self defence with top notch instruction, you won't be disappointed.

    For the average BJJ student, I'd recommend Roy Dean's Blue Belt Requirements, but for those with an interest in self defence, Gracie Combatives is the best I've ever seen.



    As you mentioned books too, that means I can stick up this:

    Mastering Jujitsu (full review): The first BJJ book you should buy. Best coverage of BJJ history and theory available, with thoughts on strategy, and a few basic techniques.

    The Guard (full review): Essential reading. Goes from beginner to slightly more advanced, keeping techniques in context. Lots of photos, multiple angles, concise and helpful descriptions.

    Jiu Jitsu University (full review): The first two chapters are ideal for beginners, with Saulo helpfully breaking down defence into survival and escapes. He methodically details how to work your way free, as well as common misconceptions. Later coverage of guard fundamentals is also good, with simple sweeps and submissions again described alongside typical problems.

    Passing the Guard (full review): Everything you could ever want to know about passing the guard is covered in this book. Opening the guard from standing or kneeling, dealing with grips, countering submissions, beating the lockdown, solo drills and of course a huge number of different passes are all present. I have some reservations about the inclusion of dubious (not to mention dangerous) techniques like neck cranks, but that aside, this book is awesome.

    Strategic Guard (full review): Slightly more advanced than The Guard, but even better in terms of presentation, coverage and textual description. Useful flow-charts at the end of each chapter. If you're looking for defensive applications of the guard and escapes, absolute must-have.

    BJJ: Theory and Technique (full review): Plenty of solid technique, but erratic layout and a focus on self-defence. Good for beginners if you don't mind flicking back and forth to find what you want. Also has a very good historical and theoretical introduction, but the one in Mastering Jujitsu is better.

    Mastering the Rubber Guard (full review): Well-presented coverage of Bravo's bottom game, but not for beginners. I'd recommend you don't pick this up until later on, certainly not before blue.
    and we have a thread winner.

    Filip, are you trying to find something to have an advantage on me? :XXjester:
    Quote Originally Posted by Jiujitsu77
    You know you are crazy about BJJ/Martial arts when...
    Quote Originally Posted by Humanzee
    ...your books on Kama Sutra and BJJ are interchangeable.
    Quote Originally Posted by jk55299 on Keysi Fighting Method
    It looks like this is a great fighting method if someone replaces your shampoo with superglue.
    The real deadly:
  3. Filip is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Belgium
    Posts
    188

    Posted On:
    10/26/2009 11:51am


     Style: Karate

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I have already a baseball bat. Plenty of advantage with that there.
    No I am trying to find a way with the ear handicap to still learn some stuff.

    Thanks for all the hints guys.
    Slideyfoot, I really appreciate the time you put in your post. I am sure others appreciate it as well.
  4. mrblackmagic is offline
    mrblackmagic's Avatar

    My pleasure.

    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    right behind you.
    Posts
    3,404

    Posted On:
    10/26/2009 2:22pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: yang taichi

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Filip View Post
    the path to black belt seems good. thanks. any better?
    I have been looking at the Bas Rutte one. You can apparently downl**d it everywhere but you have to pay and ... my googlefu is weak. Where did you get yours?
    Fuzzy searches, grasshopper. I'll PM you.
    Sumus extra manum tuam.
  5. Filip is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Belgium
    Posts
    188

    Posted On:
    10/26/2009 6:20pm


     Style: Karate

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    pm???
  6. mrblackmagic is offline
    mrblackmagic's Avatar

    My pleasure.

    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    right behind you.
    Posts
    3,404

    Posted On:
    10/26/2009 6:24pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: yang taichi

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    check your message box.
    Sumus extra manum tuam.
  7. MMAMickey is offline
    MMAMickey's Avatar

    POWERRR!

    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    England
    Posts
    2,743

    Posted On:
    10/26/2009 6:28pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Boxing.MMA

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    The X GUARD by Marcelo Garcia.. Only worth it if you have some experience.. but gives you some new techniques to try out in the gym
  8. Rene "Zendokan" Gysenbergs is offline
    Rene "Zendokan" Gysenbergs's Avatar

    fist first Philosopher

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Sanctuary of Pallas Athena (Belgium)
    Posts
    2,642

    Posted On:
    10/26/2009 6:35pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Savate (LBF/SD/LC) - BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Oh yeah Filip,

    Are we rolling tomorrow?
    (I'll check this thread tommorow at work.).
    Quote Originally Posted by Jiujitsu77
    You know you are crazy about BJJ/Martial arts when...
    Quote Originally Posted by Humanzee
    ...your books on Kama Sutra and BJJ are interchangeable.
    Quote Originally Posted by jk55299 on Keysi Fighting Method
    It looks like this is a great fighting method if someone replaces your shampoo with superglue.
    The real deadly:
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