218358 Bullies, 5169 online  
  • Register
Our Sponsors:

Results 1 to 10 of 50
Page 1 of 5 1 2345 LastLast
Sponsored Links Spacer Image
  1. Jadran is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Zagreb, Croatia
    Posts
    27

    Posted On:
    3/17/2006 2:39pm


     Style: N/A

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Shorinji Kempo and Brazilian Jujitsu

    I am planning to go study Shorinji Kempo. Regarding the methods of training, a member described me how they train. Is this the so called realistic training with resisting oponents or another McDojo?

    1. Light contact like point Karate
    2. Ligh contact with and without gear
    3. Semi contact with and without gear
    4. Semi contact like Kyokushinkai (full to the body, point to the head)
    5. Full contact with full gear
    6. Ultimate (?) with full gear

    The instructor is 8th dan Shorinji Kempo

    To complement the art I've chosen Brazilian Jujitsu. The instructor is a purple belt. Here are his qualifications:

    Željko Drinovac starts training Brazilian Jujitsu in the 2000 in the prestige New York school Jujitsu academy, and three years later Rigan Machado and Marcos Santos are appointing him as the head instructor of eastern Europe and Croatian association.
    In the second half of 2005 Rigan Machado and Marcos Santos are inviting him to asist on seminars in 15 american states presenting Brasilian Jujitsu on seminars to the best academys including the academy of Mansor Francisco (9th dan), police and army. In the last few years Željko Drinovac had the chance to train with world known names like Mike Swain - 4 time olyimpic champion in Judo, Helio Morera "Soneca" - world champion and champion of Brazil, John Donahue - trainer and sparring partner of Randy Conture, Rani Yarhya - three time world champion in Brazilian Jujitsu and Rickson Gracie.

    www.cro-bjj.org
    Last edited by Jadran; 3/17/2006 2:47pm at . Reason: Punctuation mark instead of a question mark.
  2. Teryan is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    317

    Posted On:
    3/17/2006 4:32pm


     Style: BJJ/ Judo/ MT

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    What does he mean full gear? For some people a mouth pice and a cup is "full gear".
  3. Jadran is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Zagreb, Croatia
    Posts
    27

    Posted On:
    3/17/2006 4:37pm


     Style: N/A

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
  4. Teryan is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    317

    Posted On:
    3/17/2006 4:49pm


     Style: BJJ/ Judo/ MT

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    It looks like they are about to do some full contact, so that is good. But from the way you listed those things it also looks like your going to be spending alot of time doing thigns to get ready to spar. How much time you auctually spend doing the full contact sparring and drills will determin how good you will become with your stand up game. If your spending alot of time doing kata and one steps, then mediation; your not going to become as good if you were at a boxing gym or Muay Thi gym.

    But if your looking to have fun and get in shape and learn a little stand up then that would be fine for you. I guess it comes down to what you want.
  5. Punisher is offline
    Punisher's Avatar

    Seeker of Truth

    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    2,943

    Posted On:
    3/17/2006 5:11pm

    supporting member
     Style: Five Animal Fighting

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Jadran
    I am planning to go study Shorinji Kempo. Regarding the methods of training, a member described me how they train. Is this the so called realistic training with resisting oponents or another McDojo?

    1. Light contact like point Karate
    2. Ligh contact with and without gear
    3. Semi contact with and without gear
    4. Semi contact like Kyokushinkai (full to the body, point to the head)
    5. Full contact with full gear
    6. Ultimate (?) with full gear

    [/URL]
    I'm confused. Which one represents how they train? Contact level does not always equal "resistance". And the question of realistic training goes farther than just sparring. What type of drills do they do to refine skills? Do they hit bags? Do they do katas in the air? If they hit bags, does the bag holder just stand there, or do the drills require timing and movement.

    I also train a form of kenpo and bjj together, and in my experience they complement each other quite well, but my situation was different than yours. I was already a black belt in two styles of kenpo before I ever stepped foot into a bjj school.

    I found I'm able to integrate the self-defense related techniques that my bjj school teachs in their Saturday class pretty easily into my overall game. This is primarily because we start on our feet and the takedowns, throws,holds, and controls shown use a lot of the same princples and concpets I'm familar with from my kenpo training, even if the actually techniques are different. The normal bjj classes taught during the rest of the week are a different story altogether. I was (and still am) completely lost on the ground.

    Given this, I don't know if is advisable for a person to attempt to learn two arts that are so different, from the beginning, at the same time. Aside of the logistics of having to go to two different schools, i.e. likely having two different uniforms, competing class schedules, etc... you'll have to worry about learning kempo and bjj separately and then integrating together on your own.

    My suggestion would to do at least a year of one before trying to add the other, or more preferably to find a mma-style school that integrates both from the very start.
    Last edited by Punisher; 3/17/2006 5:13pm at .
  6. Shinkengata is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Nor Cal
    Posts
    382

    Posted On:
    3/17/2006 5:14pm


     Style: BJJ,MT,Wrestling,Boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Careful of them Kenpo boys. Some of them are notorious for promoting themselves in rank. .:profe:
  7. Jadran is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Zagreb, Croatia
    Posts
    27

    Posted On:
    3/18/2006 1:48am


     Style: N/A

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Punisher
    I'm confused. Which one represents how they train? Contact level does not always equal "resistance". And the question of realistic training goes farther than just sparring. What type of drills do they do to refine skills? Do they hit bags? Do they do katas in the air? If they hit bags, does the bag holder just stand there, or do the drills require timing and movement.

    I also train a form of kenpo and bjj together, and in my experience they complement each other quite well, but my situation was different than yours. I was already a black belt in two styles of kenpo before I ever stepped foot into a bjj school.

    I found I'm able to integrate the self-defense related techniques that my bjj school teachs in their Saturday class pretty easily into my overall game. This is primarily because we start on our feet and the takedowns, throws,holds, and controls shown use a lot of the same princples and concpets I'm familar with from my kenpo training, even if the actually techniques are different. The normal bjj classes taught during the rest of the week are a different story altogether. I was (and still am) completely lost on the ground.

    Given this, I don't know if is advisable for a person to attempt to learn two arts that are so different, from the beginning, at the same time. Aside of the logistics of having to go to two different schools, i.e. likely having two different uniforms, competing class schedules, etc... you'll have to worry about learning kempo and bjj separately and then integrating together on your own.

    My suggestion would to do at least a year of one before trying to add the other, or more preferably to find a mma-style school that integrates both from the very start.
    I didn't express my self well in the first post. I wanted to train 2-3 years Kempo and then go study Brazilian Jujitsu. I will go also personally to see how they train.

    And here more pictures:

    http://www.shaolin.hr/slike/polaganj...aring4veca.jpg
    http://www.shaolin.hr/slike/polaganj...aring3veca.jpg
    http://www.shaolin.hr/slike/polaganj...aring1veca.jpg
    http://www.shaolin.hr/slike/polaganj...aring5veca.jpg
    Last edited by Jadran; 3/18/2006 1:55am at . Reason: Added pictures to the posti
  8. LI GUY 1 is offline
    LI GUY 1's Avatar

    GIJoe6186 like boys, mainly his brother

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Long Island
    Posts
    2,561

    Posted On:
    3/18/2006 2:29am

    supporting member
     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    From my experience in kempo and now BJJ, I'd study BJJ first for a few years(if I had to pick like you) I say that because i get the feeling that BJJ schools are more similar to each other in training where kempo is more a mixed bag, some good, some suck, some great.

    WHy do you want to train in kempo for 2-3 years first? You are choosing a school/style that you do not even know is any good yet and already have committed to it. I would say the same thing if you said this about any other style.

    Check everything out first and then make an informed decision. Take a month of classes the schools that seem legit and your decision to train kempo for 2-3 years may change, or it may be confirmed.
  9. Jadran is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Zagreb, Croatia
    Posts
    27

    Posted On:
    3/18/2006 2:37am


     Style: N/A

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    All this is not 100%. I will go personally to the dojo and see myself how they train and even take a few classes. Thank you for the advice. I have no problems wtih Brazilian Jujitsu as the guy has solid qualifications and is 100% legit. I wanted Shorinji Kempo because I think it's a solid striking/standup grappling art. I don't know if Shorinji Kempo has ground game. That's why I chose Brazilian Jujitsu as supplemental art. You can't go wrong when in comes to ground grappling with Brazilian Jujitsu.
  10. Yamabushi is offline
    Yamabushi's Avatar

    Isolated and Confused

    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    London, U.K.
    Posts
    197

    Posted On:
    3/18/2006 5:00am

    supporting member
     Style: Bartitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    What is the name of the 8th dan who teaches the Shorinji Kempo? I am only aware of two 8th dans in Europe, both Japanese, and as far as I kow the highest grade any European holds in Shorinji Kempo is 6th dan.

    The World Shorinji Kempo Organisation (WSKO) lists branches in Finland, France, Holland, Italy, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, Germany, Ukraine, Russia and Norway in Europe. There do not appear to be any branches in the Balkans.

    Given the level of control WSKO maintains over branches anyone claiming to teach Shorinji Kempo in a branch not listed is probably not connected to them (and that means any grade they claim is probably self-awarded - almost certainly so if they are claiming 8th dan).

    I used to practice Shorinji Kempo and the pictures you put up do not look like the sort of training I am familiar with. Technically Shorinji Kempo is a mix of karate and Hakko Ryu aiki-jutsu but contact is generally light and a lot of time is spent on fairly useless partner exercises.

    I gave up Shorinji Kempo for judo and my advice to you would be not to waste your time. Take up BJJ first and then move on to kick boxing or MT.
    Failing to become awesome since 1976
Page 1 of 5 1 2345 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Powered by vBulletin™© contact@vbulletin.com vBulletin Solutions, Inc. 2011 All rights reserved.