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  1. BadUglyMagic is offline
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    Posted On:
    10/07/2009 9:28am


     Style: slackerjitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by tgace View Post
    If I know ahead of time I can hopefully remember to use simple and direct commands to prevent confusion in the subject. Avoid physical contact unless necessary and be aware that the persons actions and vocalizations are not necessarily a threat. NOT that they are NO THREAT but that these signs could be symptoms of their disability.
    Quote Originally Posted by tgace View Post
    Sometimes you have no idea what a persons "issues" are. Sometimes you do. Sometimes you can sort of "figure it out". Simply being aware that Autism can cause some of these indicators helps some officers "figure it out". That's the best you can expect IMO.

    Here is a good LE and Autism website:

    http://policeandautism.cjb.net/avoiding.html
    Thanks. That is good advice.

    Derail over.


    edited for typos and because the initial response filled the entire page and this is an open forum.
    Last edited by BadUglyMagic; 10/07/2009 9:59am at .
  2. BadUglyMagic is offline
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    Posted On:
    10/07/2009 4:12pm


     Style: slackerjitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Back to original post

    On the same track as the pre-assaultive indicators, do/did you encourage using scripted interview questions to initiate indicator cues during questioning? Basically subconciously forcing the subject to compromise their verbal statements by behavioral cues.

    Were you able to formalize a training proram or class for your interested officers?



    edited for open forum
  3. Father Dagon is offline

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    Posted On:
    10/09/2009 2:21pm


     Style: None, but looking.

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Nice video tgace! But this scenario was point-blank tactical. If the assaulter-to-be has some distance to the intended target, they usually circle in on it. Also, theres always that distracting BS that can be a set-up for an attack from behind.
    Quote Originally Posted by permahudef View Post
    I notice that on a regular basis. I can't say that I've met anyone else who notices it. Occasionally I've played the creepy card and asked someone "Why did your heartrate just increase?":laughing7
    You just won one The Mentalist. :-)
    Quote Originally Posted by kanegs View Post
    As the parent of a child with autism, some of these indicators jump out at me as being common traits of people on the autistic spectrum:
    But a person with some autistic disorder can as well have an intense and piercing stare. I think that it could easily be misinterpreted as target stare or 1000 meter stare.
    Quote Originally Posted by Petter View Post
    I find this an interesting note. Could you expand on it? Are there other common “indicators” that are common to autistic people, but do not indicate aggression, or is it the case that the signals are in fact similar?
    Persons with AS tends to wring and knead their hands. That could be misinterpreted as a sign of not knowing what to do with the violence in the hands...
    Quote Originally Posted by tgace View Post
    As an officer I have taken numerous classes on dealing with "special needs populations". As someone interested in Pre-Assaultive Indicators I have also been presented with the "Autism Question" as well.

    All I can say about the issue is that sometimes you can tell when a person is handicapped or has a medical condition and sometimes you cant. I would not want to impress upon officers that they should "assume" that someone exhibiting the indications of aggression is Autistic or "not a threat" by default. The best that can be done is make officers aware of the Autistic symptoms so that they can make the best decision possible at the time.
    Did it also include how to deal with those who have the...er...funny type of tourettes?

    And I've heard that they hare having some kind of new mind-your-manners law in UK. Note that I think that there's anything noble with disorders. The same rules should appy for all. But it shouldn't be a criminal offense to lose your cool if you can keep it 99 times of 100.
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