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  1. Don Gwinn is offline
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    BJJ wins again!

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    Posted On:
    12/31/2006 9:49am

    supporting member
     Style: Guns

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    The "Universal Martial Arts Hall of Fame" is an interesting organization. It's hard to get a good sense of whom they've inducted, because every page before 2006 seems to flash on and off for no very good reason. However, I noticed that Shannon Ritch was "International Fighter of the Year" in 2005. I confess I'm not a huge Ritch fan, but what did he do in 2005 that eclipsed other international fighters? Frank Shamrock won in 2005 for "Outstanding Contribution to MMA" and again, I'm not sure what that contribution was. I know he feuded publicly with Baroni--other than that, what? Was his fight team doing good stuff, or did he maybe help out some events I didn't know about?

    I also noticed that Ritch has been inducted before, but not for the same stuff each year. In 2002 he won the "Protection Award of Honor," whatever that is.

    Now, to the UMAHOF's credit, they do say on their nomination page that you may not nominate yourself. But their section on payment of their induction fees is hilarious. This isn't double-talk, this is triple-talk. Step One of being inducted is to confirm your induction. Step Two is this:
    #
    Pay your induction and Expo fees. Unlike other organizations, the Universal Martial Arts Hall of Fame does not charge you an extra fee for the induction itself. The actual induction is free. Your induction fees help cover the cost of the event, your customized trophy, the printing of your Universal Martial Arts Hall of Fame personalized and numbered induction certificate, your membership card, the induction ceremony and banquet dinner and your permanent induction into roster of honorees in our office of records and on the Universal Martial Arts Hall of Fame Web site.
    It is to laugh. I'm not saying as of this moment that Master Parham has any ethical issues, but this "Hall of Fame" you're so proud of seems like a thinly veiled pay-to-play scheme. It looks like they use it to get a core of people who will bring guests to their "Martial Arts Expo." Nothing too horrible there if they're fairly open about it, but it's not exactly a real Hall of Fame if that's the case. They seem to create and destroy categories and awards at will to fit the people they want to induct. It would be interesting to know how many people they actually turn down.
    *********************************************
      #121
  2. Don Gwinn is offline
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    Posted On:
    12/31/2006 10:05am

    supporting member
     Style: Guns

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Maybe this has been published before, but in looking for Master Parham's information, I ran across a PDF of Alonzo Jones' history of Comba-Tai:

    http://www.blacfoundation.org/comba-tai.pdf

    I'm also reading the Comba-Tai message boards with interest. Here, for example, it looks like Comba-Tai leadership is excitedly discussing a new MMA promotion which needs fighters. They don't read like people who are afraid to pressure-test their art. Is this a good sign? I think so.
    http://combatai.proboards24.com/inde...ead=1164682020
    *********************************************
      #122
  3. BackFistMonkey is offline
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    Posted On:
    12/31/2006 10:21am

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     Style: Recovery-Fu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Don ...
    what kind of crazy **** did you link us all too ...

    Quote Originally Posted by Grand Master Barber


    Praise God for our warriors
    « Thread Started on Nov 19, 2006, 7:00pm »
    I was indeed a blessing to hear from Master Ronin via telephone, and even more of a blessing to hear from Master scorpion and Sensei Yang via the e-mails they sent. Please all understand that if anyone understands how busy life can be it is I. The fact that you all are busy warriors was never a small issue to me. I was well aware of how busy you all were because you were mad warriors of the Comba-Tai. I only wanted to speak o as many of you as I could and to get to know you and you me. Time is something that is promised to no one and to think that we could always speak to our brothers and sisters tomorrow may be a mistake. It s all an attempted trick of satan. To keep us so busy life's little intricacies that we have little time for family and friends. once again thank these warriors for their time.
    http://combatai.proboards24.com/inde...ead=1163980808


    Then there is this thread by the same dude .

    Quote Originally Posted by GRANDMASTER BARBER
    WHERE AR THE LEADERS?
    « Thread Started on Nov 4, 2006, 2:34pm »

    I suppose that my last post was either misunderstood or disregarded. My request was to hear from all of the Combat Specialist via telephone call. It has been at least 3 weeks since I made this request. I do see that some have visited my last post, but have failed to respond. The dream of the Grand Masters was to create a family of warriors who stood for truth, spirituality, and most importantly unity. How can we unify if we do not know each other? Either there are no more C.S.'s other than those I know of, or they have all died. Not death in the physical since, but maybe their warrior spirit. Grand Master Jones knighted many of us, but how many still do as he instructed us? My request was simple. I only asked to hear voices and to get to know those C.S.'s that I have not met or heard from in a long while. I am happy that we have this web sight to keep up with general topics and each other, but it should not be our main source of communication. Let us not turn into a gang of computer martial artist like those who so negatively posted messages on our sight some time ago.
    Grand Master Parham asked for biographies and recent pictures on all of us over 2 years ago, and still to this day our instructors page is incomplete. This is an official deadline. If your information is not received by the Grand Master by the end of the year, I think it would be safe to say that you do not consider yourselves instructors with the W.C.A. How can we consider ourselves an organization filled with ghosts. The only ones who have the right to limit contact are the Grand Masters who have gone before us. Let us not be lackadaisical in our duty, our training, or our efforts. Once again my number is (228)669-2669. If you are unable to call long distance, email me your contact number and I will call you.
    Also I want all to feel comfortable contacting me. I am not attempting to degrade anyone, only to get to know those who call themselves brothers and sisters of the W.C.A. If something were to happen to the Grand Masters, how would we know each other? How would we be able to keep all that they have fought for alive? Do we just go off and do our own things? There is so much for us to do, and so many to reach. Exchanging ideas and techniques over the internet is fine sometimes, but we must do videos, have an annual meeting, and offer our techniques to be added to the overall curriculum. I spoke with Grand Master Lopez and he is a brilliant and knowledgeable martial artist. We both agree that the curriculum needs to be a universal one. Not telling our instructors how to teach, but to offer it so that we all will have some basis to go by and then taylor it to fit our programs. There are some DVDs and curriculum available now through Grand Master Parham or myself. I look forward to getting ideas on how to increase what we have already, so please contact me if you would like a copy of the curriculum that I use here in Mississippi to review.
    Once again I look forward to hearing from all.
    Grand Master Rick Barber, CSD8, Southern Warriors, W.C.A.
    http://combatai.proboards24.com/inde...ead=1162668855

    seems really disorganized and generaly plain out weird .
    Quote Originally Posted by Bodhi108 View Post
    Nuke a unborn gay whale for Christ.
    “I don't mean to sound bitter, cold, or cruel, but I am, so that's how it comes out.”
    BILL HICKS,
    1961-1994
      #123
  4. Don Gwinn is offline
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    Posted On:
    12/31/2006 11:58am

    supporting member
     Style: Guns

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Keep reading; it gets better and better. I've registered, but I have to be approved before I can post. Master Parham's email is hidden at the site, but I'm sure I can find a phone number or email. They seem to throw around their phone numbers on the web pretty freely.

    If you want to read something really enlightening, go through the technique stuff and then, if you dare, the "Soke Mylemu" forum. So far I have yet to see anything in the techniques that isn't clearly Judo, boxing or karate. Nothing wrong with Boxing, Judo and Karate, but combining those three is not a 6,000 year old lineage from Mesopotamia.

    In the Soke Mylemu forum, there's a seven-page thread that appears to be part of a black-belt test for a girl whose nickname is "Warrior Yang." Plainly, put, it makes her and her instructors look incompetent. Some of the questions she simply does not answer at all, to continued praise from Soke Mylemu Jones. He asked her, for instance, to answer two questions:

    1. What is the strength of masculinity?
    2. What is the strength of femininity?

    Her answer to question one was a long paragraph about how both male and female are strong; however, while she related an aphorism to demonstrate that women are as strong as men in their own way, she made absolutely NO reference to men being strong in any way whatsoever. Soke Mylemu Jones praised this. Now, I couldn't care less whether his blackbelts can explain the relative strengths of men and women, but this makes it appear that Soke Mylemu is fond of asking lots of questions but not putting any thought into the answers. School teachers HATE that.

    From her answers to his questions, it appears that they subscribe to the "Too Deadly Street Lethal" school of thought. She explains (to praise from Soke Mylemu Jones, remember) that the difference between the UFC/boxing and the street is that a Comba-Tai Royal Warrior primarily strikes for the eyes, groin, and throat. She states that all other targets are merely diversions intended to open up those three targets. I found that interesting; I had not before encountered the concept that a hook to the temple, for instance, is thrown only to open up a groin shot.
    *********************************************
      #124
  5. HonkyTonkMan is offline
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    Y SO SRIUS?

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    Posted On:
    12/31/2006 2:10pm

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     Style: TKD, BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Dammit Don......I was just ranting...you actually looked this **** up.

    I looked up the UBBHOF and it seemed like a pay for title bullshit organization. Well done. I doubt if the guy will be back any time soon.
      #125
  6. Mantis is offline

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    Posted On:
    12/31/2006 3:18pm


     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Don,:wcacjack

    I appreciate what you are trying to do as oppose to rant ... I consider ranters trolls and "BS-ers." I refuse to communicate with disrespectful "pack rats" who have not done any research. But for you Don, So far, so good. If you have any questions, post them on the site.

    Keep searching and you will find what you are looking for. All you have to do is post a question to Grandmaster Parham and he will hit you back on the site. Now as far as the history, it would probably be good for you to read the manuscript and see if your critical analysis can poke holes in it. By the way, their is a $10, 000 reward for anyone that can disprove the collaboration of the evidence suggested about the 6,000 year old tradition. For over 30 years, no one has been able to discredit his claims about a 6,000 year old tradition. Perhaps $10,000 is not a significant amount of money.

    The African techniques are also listed in the manuscript and they are verified by a few historians. I see you looked at a few things on the site you didn't understand :confused: ... this is understandable. If you will post your questions on the Comba-Tai site, the Combat Specialist have a responsibility to answer you according to 1 Peter 3:15, "But give honor to Christ in your hearts as your Lord; and be ready at any time when you are questioned about the hope which is in you, to give an answer in the fear of the Lord and without pride;"

    Yes a man is innocent until proven guilty:new_puppy ...through your research I see you’ve given them the chance. I look forward to seeing what significant discrepancies that you discover, if any! Only :clock: will tell! As I said, I am not totally convinced, but Comba-Tai has many convincing arguments. By the way, I am not Dr. Jones student and I don’t and neither does he consider himself the greatest martial artist ever seen, but many of his techniques are uniquely African and they are no joke.

    The Mantis
      #126
  7. Mantis is offline

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    Posted On:
    12/31/2006 3:43pm


     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Oh, by the way:

    Dr. Jones e-mail is karatem88@yahoo.com ... please be respectful if you really want an answer.

    The manuscript is on: http://www.blacfoundation.org/comba-tai.pdf

    If you have further questions about Comba-Tai: http://www.freewebs.com/comba-tai/,h...nt%20flyer.pdf

    You may wish to visit the Comba-Tai tournament that is held every year in Biloxi, Contact: http://members.aol.com/_ht_a/combata...age/index.html

    I'll be waiting to see what you find.

    The Mantis
      #127
  8. Mantis is offline

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    Posted On:
    12/31/2006 3:52pm


     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    "The sport of boxing is at least 6,000 years old. Murals of ancient Egypt show "rings" that were either circular or squared. From there the sport spread to Crete and then to Greece where boxing gloves and rules were introduced and it joined the 23rd Olympiad in 688 B.C. as a regular sport.

    The Roman Gladiator Period brutalized the sport and it was abolished along with the Olympics by Roman Emperor Theodosius after the 291st Olympiad in 393 A.D.

    It wasn't until the 1700s in England that boxing was revived by James Figg, the "Father of Modern Boxing" and by Jack Broughton, who established rules against fouls.

    About 50 years before Dawson City was to embrace this "British" sport, the Marquis of Queensbury modernized the rules and re-introduced the padded glove. Boxing had gained a new respectability and, in the same year of 1904 when Nick Burley and Billy Woods met for the big fight, boxing was again accepted as an Olympic sport.

    Once it was too warm for the skating rink in the DAAA arena, which stood where the parking lot behind Diamond Tooth Gertie's is now, the boxing programmes would commence. "
      #128
  9. Mantis is offline

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    Posted On:
    12/31/2006 3:54pm


     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Virtual Library of Sports


    Early Boxing (to 1838)
    Fighting with fists was a sport about 6,000 years ago in what is now known as Ethiopia, from where it spread to ancient Egypt and eventually throughout the Mediterranean area. Ancient Crete also had a boxing-like sport, which probably developed independently, about 1,500 B.C.

    Although the sport wasn't added to the ancient Olympic program until 688 B.C., some sort of boxing had become pretty well established among the Greeks before that time. In one form of Greek boxing, the two combatants simply sat on stones facing and pounded away at one another until one of them was knocked out.

    Boxing in the Olympics wasn't quite that brutal, but there were no breaks in the action. Fighters wore leather thongs, originally to protect their hands and wrists. As time went on, harder leather was used, turning the thongs into weapons.

    The Romans added iron or brass studs, creating the cestus, which could be a deadly weapon. Then they went even farther, developing a cruel, spur-like instrument of bronze, called the myrmex ("limb piercer"). Boxing in the Roman Empire was not so much a sport as a bloody amusement for spectators, like the gladiatorial contests, with slaves pitted against one another in a fight to the death.

    The myrmex was finally abolished and boxing itself was banned by Rome about 30 B.C. The Romans had made one small contribution to the sport: They invented the ring, originally a simple marked circle.

    With the spread of Christianity, pugilism in any form evidently disappeared from Europe completely. It resurfaced in England in the late 17th century. A London newspaper referred to a bout in 1681, and the Royal Theatre in London was the site of regularly scheduled matches in 1698.

    The sport at that time was actually a mixture of wrestling and boxing. Although hitting with fists was emphasized, a boxer could grab and throw his opponent, then jump on him and hit him while he was down.

    James Figg, who opened a boxing academy in London in 1719, introduced a measure of skill to the sport. Figg was an expert fencer as well as a boxer, and his academy was patterned after the fencing academies of the period. He taught parrying and counter-punching, just as fencing masters taught parries and ripostes to their students.

    Figg won great publicity for his academy by challenging all comers to bouts of boxing or cudgeling, He never lost, and was generally considered champion of Great Britain until he retired in 1730.

    His success inspired the establishment of several other boxing academies in London, and the fact that he was a fencer also gave the sport some prestige. A number of "gentlemen amateurs" took up boxing as a pastime. They also became enthusiastic fans at prize fights.

    One of Figg's pupils, Jack Broughton, became known as the "father of English boxing." Broughton, generally acknowledged as champion from 1729 to 1750, taught boxing and operated an arena in London. In 1743, he drew up the first formal rules for the sport.

    Under Broughton's rules, there was a 3-foot square in the center of the ring. When a fighter was knocked down, his handlers had 30 seconds to get him into position on one side of the square, facing his opponent. In effect, this marked the first division of a bout into rounds, since each knockdown ended fighting for at least 30 seconds. Although wrestling holds were permitted, a boxer was not allowed to grab his opponent below the waist.

    Broughton also invented the first boxing gloves, known as "mufflers," to protect not only the hands but also the face from blows. However, they were used only in practice, not in actual fights.

    The rules devised by Broughton were used throughout England with only minor modifications until 1838, when the Pugilistic Society (founded in 1814) developed the London Prize Ring Rules. The new code called for a ring 24 feet square, enclosed by two ropes. A knockdown marked the end of a round. After a 30-second break, the fighters were given eight seconds to "come to scratch," unaided, in the center of the ring.
      #129
  10. Mantis is offline

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    Posted On:
    12/31/2006 3:59pm


     Style: Judo

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
      #130

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