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  1. MaverickZ is offline

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    Posted On:
    9/24/2009 11:27am

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    Quote Originally Posted by Earl Weiss View Post
    Not only read them but have most if not all on my shelf. Escept a few that were water damaged beyond saving. Please cite volume and page where his works use the term. I will see if I have it. If not, i will buy it.
    You did not understand what you read then.

    Short power, fa jing, is a way to generate force from a short distance, not requiring a long distance windup. This is seen directly in Bruce Lee's demonstrations of the one inch punch. It doesn't get any more explicit than that. Though many Chinese practitioners believe Bruce Lee to be a novice in the concept.

    If you are familiar with Bruce Lee's short distance punching, but are unfamiliar with short power, then you have done very little research into things such as power generation and body mechanics. It is one of the core ideas in many Chinese arts, including the most popular ones. And it focuses on the proper alignment of the body's bones and tendons so that a fighter can essentially "push" off the ground and be rooted into it when generating power.
    Last edited by MaverickZ; 9/24/2009 11:32am at .
  2. Earl Weiss is offline

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    Posted On:
    9/24/2009 3:13pm


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    Quote Originally Posted by MaverickZ View Post
    You did not understand what you read then.

    Short power, fa jing, is a way to generate force from a short distance, not requiring a long distance windup. This is seen directly in Bruce Lee's demonstrations of the one inch punch. It doesn't get any more explicit than that. Though many Chinese practitioners believe Bruce Lee to be a novice in the concept.

    If you are familiar with Bruce Lee's short distance punching, but are unfamiliar with short power, then you have done very little research into things such as power generation and body mechanics. It is one of the core ideas in many Chinese arts, including the most popular ones. And it focuses on the proper alignment of the body's bones and tendons so that a fighter can essentially "push" off the ground and be rooted into it when generating power.
    Thank you for explaining the term. The concept, as you explained is not difficult to understand. I can see how one would consider TKD to generaly use "Long Distance windup" compared to what you have described.

    My point concerned the use of the term "short power" and whether Bruce Lee had used it. I made no claim to reference anyone or anything else that would have used the term. I do not recall seeing it in his books, but may have missed it. I do not claim tyo have a photographic memory and it certainly does not get better as I get older.

    Since you have been kind enough to answer a queestion, perhaps you would answer another?

    Are the concepts mutualy exclusive? Or perhaps stated another way, does the idea of a motion which is longer than what would be considered short power neccessarily exclude "the proper alignment of the body's bones and tendons so that a fighter can essentially "push" off the ground and be rooted into it when generating power."?
  3. Earl Weiss is offline

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    Posted On:
    9/24/2009 3:15pm


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    These concepts are not difficult to understand:
    " The whiplike or coiled spring action of the human body in it's striking ( throwing) movement - pattern is a remarkeable phenomenon.. The movement of the body may start with a push of the toes, continue with the straightening of the knees and trunk, add the shoulder rotation..."

    One does not "hit with his feet", but he does start the momentum with his feet."
  4. MaverickZ is offline

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    Posted On:
    9/24/2009 3:48pm

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    Quote Originally Posted by Earl Weiss View Post
    Are the concepts mutualy exclusive? Or perhaps stated another way, does the idea of a motion which is longer than what would be considered short power neccessarily exclude "the proper alignment of the body's bones and tendons so that a fighter can essentially "push" off the ground and be rooted into it when generating power."?
    If you are attempting to ask leading questions to lead this into a relationship between short power and the sive wave, which is after all the topic of this thread, it'd be much better if you just came out and explained your inquiry. Otherwise you're just beating around the bush, and that's really lame.
  5. MaverickZ is offline

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    Posted On:
    9/24/2009 3:51pm

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    Quote Originally Posted by Earl Weiss View Post
    My point concerned the use of the term "short power" and whether Bruce Lee had used it. I made no claim to reference anyone or anything else that would have used the term. I do not recall seeing it in his books, but may have missed it. I do not claim tyo have a photographic memory and it certainly does not get better as I get older.
    The reason why you are not aware of short power is because you did not bother to research where Bruce Lee got his ideas from. In my opinion, he had great breadth of martial art education, but not great depth. And he was a meticulous note taker.

    Where is JFS when you need him?
  6. DerAuslander is offline
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    Posted On:
    9/24/2009 5:12pm

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     Style: BJJ/C-JKD/KAAALIII!!!!!!!

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  7. MaverickZ is offline

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    Posted On:
    9/24/2009 7:21pm

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    Sort of like Beetlejuice. Say his name three times, and he breaks my neck while I'm asleep.
  8. Earl Weiss is offline

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    Posted On:
    9/25/2009 6:47pm


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    Quote Originally Posted by MaverickZ View Post
    The reason why you are not aware of short power is because you did not bother to research where Bruce Lee got his ideas from. In my opinion, he had great breadth of martial art education, but not great depth. And he was a meticulous note taker.

    Where is JFS when you need him?
    You are correct, I di not make any specific attempts to research where Bruce Lee got his ideas from . It was not realy relevant to the post.

    I was accused of not reading sources I cited or not understanding them simply because I was not familiar with the term "Short Power" .

    It was certainly possible that I did not recall that term as being in those sources. Yet, no one has cited an instance of where the term exists in those sources. Further, if the quotes in my post above, are also ways of explaining the term "Short Power" then the concept is not difficult to understand, and simply becuase someone uses the term does not give them the monopoly on understanding the concepts.

    Now, to the matter at hand. Der stated, that sine wave has nothing to do with "Short Power" . As you explained it, or at least as I understand your explanation, there is no "Wind Up" in short power, and again as I understand it a "Wind Up" would in fact be characteristic of many TKD techniques. So, in that sense there is not a relationship between many TKD techniques and short power.

    However, as you explained the term having to do with rooting and alignment, I would submit that those elements, and the concepts of wind up are not neccessarily mutualy exclusive.

    Let the flames begin.
  9. It is Fake is offline
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    Posted On:
    9/25/2009 6:53pm

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    Quote Originally Posted by Earl Weiss View Post
    You are correct, I di not make any specific attempts to research where Bruce Lee got his ideas from . It was not realy relevant to the post.

    I was accused of not reading sources I cited or not understanding them simply because I was not familiar with the term "Short Power" .

    It was certainly possible that I did not recall that term as being in those sources. Yet, no one has cited an instance of where the term exists in those sources. Further, if the quotes in my post above, are also ways of explaining the term "Short Power" then the concept is not difficult to understand, and simply becuase someone uses the term does not give them the monopoly on understanding the concepts.

    Now, to the matter at hand. Der stated, that sine wave has nothing to do with "Short Power" . As you explained it, or at least as I understand your explanation, there is no "Wind Up" in short power, and again as I understand it a "Wind Up" would in fact be characteristic of many TKD techniques. So, in that sense there is not a relationship between many TKD techniques and short power.

    However, as you explained the term having to do with rooting and alignment, I would submit that those elements, and the concepts of wind up are not neccessarily mutualy exclusive.

    Let the flames begin.
    No. Short power can be taught and used by any style IMO. It is not a technique in the definition you are applying.
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