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  1. #21

    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    13
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    wait, does the name translate to "art of the empty hand waving pines?"

    edit: http://www.shotojutsu.com/board_of_directors.htm
    wtf, who started "shoto jutsu karate?"


    Aikido gifs on the front page of that site????

    double edit: http://shotojutsu.com/links.htm pure win
    Last edited by krept; 9/15/2009 8:09pm at .

  2. #22

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    Jun 2009
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Few problems.

    1. Shoto jitsu? Jitsu is a suffix and has absolutly nothing to do with Jujitsu by itself. He cut apart "shotokan" and took the non-root word from "jujitsu" and then named his own fake style. This sounds like a concocted style.

    2. All power in Shotokan comes from the ground. Most Shotokan dojos refuse to use mats for anything but throwing techniques because the cushion takes away power from striking. Mats are fine for ground fighting, but don't work well in Shotokan. He might be legit but I don't believe he ever studied Shotokan.

    I still encourage you to try a class.

  3. #23

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Alex \m/ View Post
    All power in Shotokan comes from the ground. Most Shotokan dojos refuse to use mats for anything but throwing techniques because the cushion takes away power from striking. Mats are fine for ground fighting, but don't work well in Shotokan.
    Striking works just fine on mats. MMA fighters punch and kick on mats all the time. Why wouldn’t it? All you need is solid footing.

    Last time I heard this “power in Shotokan comes from the ground” line it was from someone who thought that Shotokan fighters derived some mystical power from the earth and were therefore invincible so long as their feet were on the floor. Saying “power comes from the ground” is not meaningful.
    [ petterhaggholm.net | blog | essays ]
    [ self defence: general thoughts | bjj: “don’t go to the ground”? ]
    “The plural of anecdote is anecdotes, not data.”

  4. #24
    maofas's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Alex \m/ View Post
    Most Shotokan dojos refuse to use mats for anything but throwing techniques because the cushion takes away power from striking.
    Yeah, it's really crucial in the dojo that you have that last 1% of your full power for punching pads and training partners. /facepalm

  5. #25

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Petter View Post
    Striking works just fine on mats. MMA fighters punch and kick on mats all the time. Why wouldn’t it? All you need is solid footing.

    Last time I heard this “power in Shotokan comes from the ground” line it was from someone who thought that Shotokan fighters derived some mystical power from the earth and were therefore invincible so long as their feet were on the floor. Saying “power comes from the ground” is not meaningful.
    No mystical power. Just solid footing. And when the ground gives even a good stance loses its power.

  6. #26
    maofas's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    In that case you should never wear shoes in the street. You might be attacked and your sneakers will cushion and take some of your power away.

    (Please stop...if you make my palm hit my forehead anymore I might wind up with a concussion.)

  7. #27

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Alex \m/ View Post
    No mystical power. Just solid footing. And when the ground gives even a good stance loses its power.
    Could have sworn that pivoting and hip turning were essentials in any martial art. As long as the ground isn't slippery you should be able to throw a punch just fine. I tried a little footwork and pad work in a wrestling school and i didn't have a problem except for the occasional slip because everyone had recently rolled and the floor was covered in sweat. This is just anecdotal so bear with me...

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