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  1. #11
    hungryjoe's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Clean what you can and give the girl what she really wants.

    A nice keen edge.

    Be sure to wash out all of the grit from your cleaning and give the old gal some oil on the pins.

    Enjoy. You have a carbon blade that won't roll the edge like most of the stainless crap today.

  2. #12
    Don Gwinn's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    The word you're searching for is "patina." It's not going to hurt the blade in any way (though the rust would) nor does it detract from the value--a lot of people really like a nice patina. In fact, a lot of people stain newer carbon-steel blades with all kinds of acidic compounds, ranging from various vinegars to mustard to Coke and Pepsi.

    If this is going to be stored for long periods without being oiled or used, it would be a good idea to use something like Renaissance Wax or Sentry Solutions--something that will adhere on the blade and form a thicker layer. That will give you much longer-term protection than lighter oils.
    *********************************************

  3. #13
    ChenPengFi's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    For storage I use White Lightning bicycle lube. Wipes on and dries into a wax film in seconds.

  4. #14
    ignatzami's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by hungryjoe View Post
    Clean what you can and give the girl what she really wants.

    A nice keen edge.

    Be sure to wash out all of the grit from your cleaning and give the old gal some oil on the pins.

    Enjoy. You have a carbon blade that won't roll the edge like most of the stainless crap today.
    I think I'll polish, then ship the knife to Case to be oiled and sharpened.
    I do not aspire to be great, or even good, I hope to suck a little less then last class.

  5. #15
    hungryjoe's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by ignatzami View Post
    I think I'll polish, then ship the knife to Case to be oiled and sharpened.
    Don's post on patina was spot on.

    There are some things that are not hurt by age when aged gently.

    Knives, coins, bronze statues, etc are prized in their naturally aged state.

    Learn to sharpen your knives yourself. Some find it wearysome work while others just can't get the hang of pulling/pushing a blade at a consistent angle to achive something capable of shaving with.

    Those that can, take satisfaction from the ability to do so.

    Honestly, I wouldn't polish the blade. The black is patina. Prize it. It aged and the fact that there's no real rust speaks for the carbon content, heat treat and overall quality of the carbon steel blades that once were common place.

    Put it in a drawer. Better to let it age gracefully than to risk losing something that came from grandpa.

  6. #16
    Robstafarian's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Wow, I have been checking in on this thread and I just want to thank those of you who've discussed patina. I had no idea anyone valued blades by this measure.

    Not to derail the thread, but how does that apply to unfinished, high carbon blades such as this?

  7. #17
    ChenPengFi's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I love a blade with a nice patina, as i do a well seasoned skillet.
    Blades with obvious signs of neglect, like old rust spots, do not have the same appeal for me.
    If you've already started to polish the blade, imo you might as well do a proper job.
    Any patina thereafter will be nice and consistent.

    As for sharpening, i "learned" with cheap steel machetes/files and later on a Lansky kit.
    Now i free hand for the most part.
    I love my soup bowl bottoms!

  8. #18
    ignatzami's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hungryjoe View Post
    Don's post on patina was spot on.

    There are some things that are not hurt by age when aged gently.

    Knives, coins, bronze statues, etc are prized in their naturally aged state.

    Learn to sharpen your knives yourself. Some find it wearysome work while others just can't get the hang of pulling/pushing a blade at a consistent angle to achive something capable of shaving with.

    Those that can, take satisfaction from the ability to do so.

    Honestly, I wouldn't polish the blade. The black is patina. Prize it. It aged and the fact that there's no real rust speaks for the carbon content, heat treat and overall quality of the carbon steel blades that once were common place.

    Put it in a drawer. Better to let it age gracefully than to risk losing something that came from grandpa.
    This is a skill I really want to learn, but I'm worried that if by learning on a knife I want to keep as long as humanly possible I could damage the blade. If I owned a working knife I'd learn to sharpen it before touching the Case.
    I do not aspire to be great, or even good, I hope to suck a little less then last class.

  9. #19
    ignatzami's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by hungryjoe View Post
    Honestly, I wouldn't polish the blade. The black is patina. Prize it. It aged and the fact that there's no real rust speaks for the carbon content, heat treat and overall quality of the carbon steel blades that once were common place.

    Put it in a drawer. Better to let it age gracefully than to risk losing something that came from grandpa.
    I laughed at the first part of this post. I know the quality of the blade well, I still carry the scar on my hand from trying to learn to whittle using this knife and balsa. Suffice to say it cut like a knife through hot butter, right into my hand.
    I do not aspire to be great, or even good, I hope to suck a little less then last class.

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