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  1. drummingman is offline

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    Oct 2006
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    Posted On:
    8/07/2009 2:29am


     Style: non right now

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Muay thai kicks

    I used to take muay thai a long time ago. I was thinking about the shin kicks that muay thai fighers use all the time. To my knowledge kids in thailand start muay thai training when they are very young and they are kicking pads at first and then they move on to kicking harder objects. This conditions there shins to where when they kick another person legs hitting shin on the other persons bones they are less likely to hurt themselves. Now, what about the american that starts muay thai when they are older? In the clases they kick pads and when they spar they kick other people making contact with bonoe on bone. The thing is that they are noting kicking bone on bone with all thir power and might. This got me thinking about the fact that the american, if he has to kick someone in a real fight at some point, is very likely to injure themselves.

    Check out this video: YouTube - Muay Thai Broken Leg

    Here is another example: YouTube - Cage fighter gets his leg broken

    I have to say that this kind of an injury would be a nightmare. But it seems to me that it could very likely happen to a person that has not trained kicking very hard objects for a good long time. And from what i remember we were always just kicking pads and then when a person does spar that are not really kicking at full power and therefore not really conditioning their shins good enough. But who other then guys who want to compete are going to go kick a tree with theor shins 100 times a day? And if they do this they still risk this kind of devastating injury. It just makes me wonder if these types of kicks are really practical with the risk of this great an injury to the legs.

    Dont freak out, im not saying muay thai sucks or anything like that. It just seems to me that these types of kicks are not very smart.
  2. vile_zoidberg is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/07/2009 9:04am


     Style: Judo (injury), ETS-do

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I think those injuries are more freak accidents, or are the result of loooong repeated trauma. If you are looking at MT kicks for self-defense, I very highly doubt that the victim will be exchanging shin kicks with the assaulter for very long.
  3. ttankzero is offline

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    North Canton, Ohio
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    Posted On:
    8/07/2009 9:06am


     Style: Ex-TKD, Crappling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    In both these cases, the kicker failed to turn their body about and hit with the inside of their shin bone instead of the very top.

    Does anyone else agree that this probably plays an important roll in the shins being broken? I think the shins may be a lot harder to break if ... well... the force comes directly on the peak of the shin bone in the z direction with respect to the orientation of the leg. (The right side of the leg being the positive x direction, towards the knee being the y direction, and towards the calf being the z direction.. left-handed-rule)

    If anyone knows what I mean.
  4. Torakaka is offline
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    Do you eat breakfast?

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    Posted On:
    8/07/2009 11:09am

    supporting member
     Style: Kitty Pow Pow!!!

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by ttankzero View Post
    In both these cases, the kicker failed to turn their body about and hit with the inside of their shin bone instead of the very top.

    Does anyone else agree that this probably plays an important roll in the shins being broken? I think the shins may be a lot harder to break if ... well... the force comes directly on the peak of the shin bone in the z direction with respect to the orientation of the leg. (The right side of the leg being the positive x direction, towards the knee being the y direction, and towards the calf being the z direction.. left-handed-rule)

    If anyone knows what I mean.
    I definitely agree that the reason for the leg breaks is because of bad kicking technique, though not so much because of where the kick is landing on the shin. In both kicks, the kickers are stiff legging their kicks, not turning through, and because of this all the strain of the kick is solidly driving through their shin rather than being displaced throughout the leg. On a proper kick, the leg is supposed to be loose and still bent on the point of impact and the shin drives through with the turning of the hip making for a springy, shock absorbing impact. The impact happens, then the straightening of the leg happens so that the leg still has give to it on impact and can allow for weight to be driven through the target. When the leg is already straight on impact, all the of the force of the impact is going into that point on the shin. That's when nasty injuries like this occur.

    The reason why people new to muaythai hurt their shins on the heavy bag isn't so much because they lack the iron shins of the experienced practitioner, it's because they don't know how to kick right. They end up slamming a tensed leg into a hard bag. Someone that knows how to kick correctly will have no trouble kicking a solid banana bag because they know to keep the leg loose and relaxed and how to drive the force of the kick through the target rather than slamming the point of impact with a tense leg.
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