222229 Bullies, 4477 online  
  • Register
Our Sponsors:

Results 1 to 9 of 9
Sponsored Links Spacer Image
  1. bgaesop is offline

    Featherweight

    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    11

    Posted On:
    7/16/2009 5:04am

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: none

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Baranta

    Baranta is the traditional Hungarian martial art. It's so obscure there isn't even a Wikipedia page for it. I know nothing about it.

    Youtube has plenty of videos of people doing Baranta.

    I have very little experience with martial arts. In the fall I will be in Penn State where I plan on attending this place where I will take their reality based mma class, which people on here have already said is a good idea, so I'm feeling good about that. I'll only be in Pennsylvania for the one semester, though, and if all goes according to plan I will be in Budapest, Hungary for the spring, so I thought, why not learn a Hungarian martial art?

    Of course, I don't want to do that if it's a load of nonsense. So, does anyone here know if it's a load of nonsense? Any Hungarians here who can recommend me a school in Budapest?

    And finally, completely unrelated to baranta but just me asking for advice, my plan was to diversify my training by taking a bunch of different martial arts, since I don't have any plans to be a professional fighter or the like-hence my taking the mma class, baranta, I started capoeira this summer but quit it because it was too silly even for me, and later I'll probably take Muay Thai and BJJ. Is that a good idea or really dumb?
  2. A.M. is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    190

    Posted On:
    7/16/2009 9:31am


     Style: none

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    It seems interesting. Its suppose to be a DUMagyar created martial art right?

    Here are some of those vids you were talking about

    YouTube - Baranta-Hungarian Traditional Martial Art

    YouTube - Baranta - Pucskó Zsolt - Kurultaj 2008 - 2.
  3. bgaesop is offline

    Featherweight

    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    11

    Posted On:
    7/17/2009 12:41am

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: none

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I have no idea what DUMagyar means.
  4. kwan_dao is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Europe
    Posts
    257

    Posted On:
    7/17/2009 8:23am


     Style: sambo, stuff

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by bgaesop View Post
    I have no idea what DUMagyar means.
    Me too. And I practically live in Hungary (well almost). Maybe an abbreviation for some Hungarian historical reconstruction group?

    Never heard of Baranta before BTW. Now that does not have to mean a lot, as I do not speak Hungarian (extremely hard language to learn!). If it did exist, it almost certainly died out for several hundred years and was reconstructed I think.

    Hungary was part of the Austrian monarchy for a long time. Austria had its own systems of military training and put huge effort into the assimilation of the "Kronlšnder". I think the K&K bureucrats (and the Hungarian aristocrats who ruled the country under their guidance) would never have tolerated "wild" practicing of a full fledged martial art.

    There are a huge lot of traditional horse-back games which survived in Hungaria to the present day. Some of them even make use of wooden lances. But they are training for cowmen (cowherds?). Not martial training.

    Having watched some of those Baranta videos, it has to be said those guys do quite some tremendous stuff from horseback though.
  5. A.M. is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    190

    Posted On:
    7/17/2009 9:23am


     Style: none

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Sorry. It's a type-o (for some reason I can't find the edit button) I meant to write magyars.
  6. DdlR is offline
    DdlR's Avatar

    Light Heavyweight

    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    4,766

    Posted On:
    7/17/2009 11:50am

    supporting member
     Style: Bartitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I wonder how much of this is documentably historical, as distinct from being a (relatively) modern reconstruction.

    Over the past couple of decades we've seen the emergence a number of purportedly ancient, hitherto little-known martial arts from countries including Korea, Peru, Egypt and several eastern European nations. Some of them are clearly recreations of ancestral fighting styles, perhaps inspired by surviving folk-level traditions but including modern elements; others seem to be more purely living-lineage styles, finally coming to light as communication technology filters in to remote regions.

    Similar examples from other Eastern European countries include Georgian Khridoli and Ukranian Boyovyi Hopak - many clips on YouTube if people are interested.

    My guess is that Baranta represents a form of re-constructionist Hungarian martial art, which may draw from some genuine and still-surviving traditions (folk sports, etc.) along with more-or-less romantic inventions (including a sort of neo-Pagan spiritual component, training drills that amount to theatrical fight choreography, etc.) as well as influences from historically unrelated MAs.

    A number of modern Eastern European re-constructionist martial arts feature a nationalist flavour and a radical right-wing political agenda. IMO they are basically cultural reactions against generations of Soviet repression; the same thing is happening in religion, art, theatre and numerous other social arenas throughout the former USSR.

    All of which is fine and dandy, except that the official histories/promotional material of these styles can sometimes gloss over their modern re-construction and/or outright invention, referring instead to "ancient martial arts dating back to the (insert name of widely admired historical warriors/national folk heroes here)". Insofar as these styles include genuine folk combat sports, etc., those elements may well date back a long way - it's probably unprovable, but not unlikely. However, when they start fudging the details of their actual modern histories, it's time to call BS.
  7. A.M. is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    190

    Posted On:
    7/17/2009 12:05pm


     Style: none

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Here is a link to brief history of Baranta.

    http://www.usadojo.com/styles/about-baranta.htm
  8. DdlR is offline
    DdlR's Avatar

    Light Heavyweight

    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    4,766

    Posted On:
    7/17/2009 12:45pm

    supporting member
     Style: Bartitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    IMO the most likely scenario is that during the 20th century, physical education instructors/units in various Eastern European military academies developed training programs drawing from the remnants of genuine (historical) folk-level combat sports, their own experiments with various traditional weapons, re-interpretations of "martial" folk-dances and other sources. What we're seeing now in Baranta, Boyovyi Hopak, Khridoli and similar styles is a civilian/commercial evolution of those programs, with an overlay of various cultural and political agendas.
  9. kwan_dao is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Europe
    Posts
    257

    Posted On:
    7/18/2009 12:20am


     Style: sambo, stuff

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Well put DdlR.

    Did you notice the big similarity between Hopak hand-to-hand fighting and the Hungarian version? I think it would only be natural that the eastern Europe recreationist movements would have influenced each other and exchanged techniques.

    About the neo-pagan aspect:

    Hungaria has a living tradition of shamanism, which dates back to god knows when. Hungaria is a modern European society, but still, tribal traditions and shamans are fully accepted and deeply integrated (I personally know a declared Hungarian shaman through my NGO work). Its very much centered around horses and allways reminds me a lot of American first-nation traditions.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Powered by vBulletin™© contact@vbulletin.com vBulletin Solutions, Inc. 2011 All rights reserved.