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  1. blankslate is offline

    WEIGHTING

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    Jul 2003
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    Posted On:
    1/19/2004 11:45pm

    supporting member
     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    "Too much" would be fairly accurate...
  2. Moleculo is offline
    Moleculo's Avatar

    nuthin' ta f*ck with

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    ORYGUN
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    8,218

    Posted On:
    1/19/2004 11:58pm

    supporting member
     Style: MT/SUB GRAPPLING

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I'm going to go watch The History of Barbarians on the history channel.
    When I get back I'm going to pretend this conversation never took place.
  3. blankslate is offline

    WEIGHTING

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    Posted On:
    1/20/2004 12:03am

    supporting member
     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I need to pretend some things never took place.
  4. SmackDown is offline

    Registered Member

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    Nov 2003
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    53

    Posted On:
    1/20/2004 1:20am


     Style: Boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Okay, I'm back with a few more points.

    First, Ronin is right when he says that muscle shape is genetically predetermined. You can make a muscle larger or smaller but you can't change it's shape (with the possible exception of multi action muscles in which you can conentrate on areas of the muscle but that's way beyond the scope of this conversation). That whole long lean muscle thing is a myth, muscles are lean by definition and their lengh is only related to genetics and the amount of stretching you do.

    Weight training does not affect your flexibility, many IFBB pros have insane (read men doing the splits) flexibility because they stretch a lot. Stretching affects flexibility, not weight training.

    Gaining mass is primarily a function of eating (as Ronin said) if you train hard but only eat at or below maintenance calories you'll never get any bigger. This is how many athletes (including olympic weightlifters) keep their weight down despite the enormous volume of training they undertake.

    On the subject of endurance, you forgot to define whether we're talking about muscular endurance or aerobic endurance. If it's the latter you can either define it in terms of aerobic power (MVO2) or aerobic capacity (which is hideously difficult to measure). Of courrse for martial arts the lactic threshold and anerobic capacity are much more important. If it's the former it's simply a muscle's ability to apply a force (whether dynamic or static) against a given resistance for a period of time.

    On the subject of penis length I'm Canadian so we measure in cm which makes it seem much more impressive. . .22cm

    Word
  5. Jenfucius is offline

    Shogun of Long Island

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    4,013

    Posted On:
    1/20/2004 1:56am

    Join us... or die
     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    i just use qigong to increase strength. by qigong, i mean squats. by strength, i mean ass-whupping ability.
  6. Nid is offline

    Light Heavyweight

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    Oct 2003
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    Posted On:
    1/20/2004 11:43am

    supporting member
     Style: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    It's simply a muscle's ability to apply a force (whether dynamic or static) against for a period of time.
    Now this is starting to become much more cohesive, regardless of the metabolic state of things.

    Of course, there's always resistance and always time. It's the threshold at which strength becomes endurance that seems to escape people.

    Then there's the idea that reconciles that problem...

    When strength increases, the relative intensity of any given task decreases.

    Which means that task which used to be maximal, but is now submaximal, can be performed, by definition, more than once. "Once" meaning momentary force ouput.

    As for aerobic capacity, well, consider this...

    http://www.llnl.gov/LLESA-groups/cyc...strength.shtml

    a University of Maryland study published last June in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. Ten cyclists went through a 12-week strength-training program, while eight cyclists were controls. The training resulted in strength gains of 31 percent in leg extension and 35 percent in leg flexion, 30 percent in maximal leg extension and 52 percent in maximal leg flexion, and a 20 percent increase in maximal bench-press strength.

    VO2 max values remained the same in both groups (44 ml/kg/min in the strength-training group and 47 in the control group; both figures are typical of a person of average fitness). And pedaling time to exhaustion at 75 percent of peak effort did not change in the control group: 28 minutes.

    Ah, but in the strength-training group of riders, pedaling time to exhaustion went from 26 to 35 minutes, about a 33 percent increase.



    Last edited by Nid; 1/20/2004 11:51am at .
  7. Sharlintier is offline
    Sharlintier's Avatar

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    Oct 2003
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    2,010

    Posted On:
    1/20/2004 2:36pm


     Style: Okinowan Shuri

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Originally posted by SmackDown
    First, Ronin is right when he says that muscle shape is genetically predetermined. You can make a muscle larger or smaller but you can't change it's shape (with the possible exception of multi action muscles in which you can conentrate on areas of the muscle but that's way beyond the scope of this conversation). That whole long lean muscle thing is a myth, muscles are lean by definition and their lengh is only related to genetics and the amount of stretching you do.

    Weight training does not affect your flexibility, many IFBB pros have insane (read men doing the splits) flexibility because they stretch a lot. Stretching affects flexibility, not weight training.

    Gaining mass is primarily a function of eating (as Ronin said) if you train hard but only eat at or below maintenance calories you'll never get any bigger. This is how many athletes (including olympic weightlifters) keep their weight down despite the enormous volume of training they undertake.
    Like I said before, I never looked much into it. I am going purely by what my physical therapists and personal trainers have told me and they all sing the same song. Plus, I have seen changes in my own bulk without changing my strength or the way I eat when following their advice and continue to follow it. For what is is worth, I have seen and measured differences in my own body. However, I must admit that I have only had physical therapists and personal trainers after serious injury so I can't really speak for increased range of motion and flexibility because those things were affected more by pain and injury at the time than actual exercise. I would see the therapist until I was better and then spend 6 months to a year with a personal trainer just to make sure I wasn't going to get carried away and do something stupid.

    When I would go to higher weights and fewer reps I found I stayed at the same strength level but my measurements would get bigger. I never changed my eating or work out habits. So if you are right then unless the more reps and lighter weight burns considerablly more calories I would be at a loss to explain the difference.
    Last edited by Sharlintier; 1/20/2004 2:45pm at .
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