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  1. Phrost is offline
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    Posted On:
    1/18/2004 5:06pm

    Business Class Supporting Memberstaff
     Guy Who Pays the Bills and Gets the Death Threats Style: MMA (Retired)

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    (Relatively ) Light weight, High reps?

    Wouldn't such a training regimen be more applicable to martial arts?

    This is assuming you've already developed a comfortable level of strength. Shouldn't one work in a single day of muscle endurance lifts? Or would it be better to do as a two-week period in between strength training programs to keep you progressing?

    Anyone have some thoughts on this?
  2. Bang! is offline
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    Posted On:
    1/18/2004 5:46pm

    supporting memberBullshido Newbie
     Style: Wu Style TCC + BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    This is a good post, Phrost, and something that I'd also like to hear some feedback on. I've always taken the approach that strength training should either:
    a) Mirror the same type of movements (including speed) that you employ in your discipline of choice
    b) Be used to supplement very specific movements that you do not currently have sufficient strength to complete, and dropped as soon as you can do those movements on your own

    The potential problems with long-term attempts to build strength, IMHO, seem to be increased muscular tension, inefficient muscle mass (i.e it don't do much, but is shore is heavy) and the need to continually adjust your coordination.

    Once you've attained a good amount of strength--something that is both usable and sustainable in the long-term--shouldn't the role of weight training shift from strength-development to general conditioning?
    Last edited by Bang!; 1/18/2004 8:46pm at .
  3. Kempocos is offline

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    Posted On:
    1/18/2004 7:51pm

    supporting member
     Style: SECRET DEADLY

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I agree with the use of lighter / higher in the wieght training. I mix it one day HEAVY / LOW next LIGHT / HIGH. It takes two days to work a body area. I find the LIGHT / HIGH helps with endurance for sparring. I really like this on when doing cable cross's.
    ----------------------------------------
    After reading Jekyll's threads I bring back an old sig.......

    Do you really train or just bore people on message boards and parties talking about it.
  4. Hannibal is offline

    Grandmaster Sensei of Village Idiocy

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    Posted On:
    1/18/2004 8:01pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Kyokushin and Judo.

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Ronin ! Where are you? we need you over here.

    Seriously though I agree I prefer to do reps on weights of 10-15 that on heavy weights and only being able to do reps of 5.
    Hannibal: The sworn enemy of dishonest politicians, source of entertainment on Bullshido and newly appointed Office Linebacker. Terry Tait ain't got **** on me !!!!
  5. Mr. Mantis is offline
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    One Ambulance, Eleven Cops...

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    Posted On:
    1/18/2004 8:38pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Kung Fu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I am also curious to hear some thoughts if a routine like that will sustain and increase strength and power. A 3 month heavy weights program will generate strength and bulk.

    I value CMA strength programs for endurance, power, strength, body conditioning and hardening.
    “We are surrounded by warships and don’t have time to talk. Please pray for us.” — One Somali Pirate.
  6. SmackDown is offline

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    Posted On:
    1/18/2004 8:46pm


     Style: Boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I think part of the problem with training is that martial artists really don't differentiate between the physical attributes that will best aid in their martial art. For example a striker will need a great deal more explosive power in the triceps than a grappler will.

    Anyway, my generalized suggestion for training for martial artists is as follows:

    One heavy day. This day should consist of low rep, heavy weight, compound exercises such as bench, dead, squat, chins etc. The goal on this day is to build strength in the muscles. This strength building will occur both on a structural level (proliferation of the contractile proteins myosin and actin) and a functional level (increased motor unit recruitment).

    One explosive day. This day could utilize either dynamic effort compound exercises such as explosive/jump squats or olympic style lifts such as hang cleans. This goal on this day is to increase motor unit recruitment and decrease time to peak tension for motor units recruited. This is a non-specific day but will result in faster movement during performance of the actual sport.

    One high rep day. This day should utilize compound exercises as well (isolation exercises have few, if any, applications toward martial arts training). These exercises should be done for higher reps (15+) or should be done for longer time under tension (60sec plus) and are designed to increase muscular endurance.

    The rest of your training should occur within the confines of your martial arts club. Remember that structrual adaptations to weight training such as the proliferation of myosin and actin (heavy lifting) or the proliferation of mitochondria and an increase in sarcoplasm (light training) will carry over far better than the fuctional adaptations that occur from lifting.

    Now at this point you're probably asking yourself "why did this guy include an explosive day if that last statement is true?" or at least you are if you've continued to read this far.

    The reason is that there will be some carry over of functional adaptations to the practice of your sport. However, if you were to drop the explosive day and opt for another in club training session instead that would be a very reasonable choice.

    So, now you've got an answer.

    Word
  7. Ronin is offline

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    Posted On:
    1/19/2004 3:21pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Shi Ja Quan

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I would get professional help with ANY type of explosive movment.
    DO NOT try to "mimic" MA moves with weights.
  8. Bang! is offline
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    Posted On:
    1/19/2004 3:28pm

    supporting memberBullshido Newbie
     Style: Wu Style TCC + BJJ

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Originally posted by ronin69
    I would get professional help with ANY type of explosive movment.
    What do you see as being the most common mistakes made in training explosive movements?
  9. Sharlintier is offline
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    Posted On:
    1/19/2004 3:36pm


     Style: Okinowan Shuri

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    When I was working with physical therapists and a personal trainer I was always told to use lighter weights and do more reps. The explaination I was given is that this will make your muscles longer, leaner, stronger and have better tone without adding bulk which most women don't want and I have more than enough of. Plus with lighter weights and more reps you are less likely to injure or re-injure yourself and it is what is recommended when rehab an injury.

    As for the rest of it, I have no clue I haven't looked into it that far.

    *edit - forgot to mention that the longer leaner muscles increase your flexibility and range of motion where bulk can actually decrease it after a point*

    Last edited by Sharlintier; 1/19/2004 3:39pm at .
  10. Ronin is offline

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    Posted On:
    1/19/2004 3:50pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Shi Ja Quan

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Explosive movements have a higher rate on injury, get someone to show you the CORRECT way and start off light and work your way up, but excellent form is of the upmost importance.

    The shape of your muscles has to do with genetics and NOT how you train your musles.
    You will bulk up with tweight training IF you EAT to bulk up.
    There are many athletes that do NOT bulk up and do some serious weight lifting.
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