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  1. goingd is offline

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    Posted On:
    5/10/2009 6:21pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Taekwondo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    What is a "true" Hapkido curriculum

    I am new. Nice to meet you and all that. ^-^

    Now I have a question I mull over all of the time.
    What do you consider to be an adequate Hapkido curriculum? To be more specific, assuming that the curriculum already covers rolling, falling, good conditioning, breathing, and teaches quality techniques, HOW MANY techniques do you think should be taught [before 1st Dan and after]?

    GM Choi covered thousands of techniques all together. Most masters cover hundreds before 1st Dan. Some only teach fifty up to that point. The style Hankido by the late Myung Jae Nam teaches only 12 techniques total (I know I said "Hapkido", but I count Hankido).

    When I was still formerly training in Hapkido I only learned about 30-40 techniques before 1st Dan. I've had to use it like only once, and I didn't need to know a hundred things to pull it off.

    What do you think?
  2. svt2026 is offline

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    Posted On:
    5/12/2009 4:24pm


     Style: hapkido

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    no one answered you in a hurry. The amount of techniques being thought depends on the instructor. There are only so many ways you can apply a joint lock and the large amount of techniques in hapkido actually are just combinations and variations of the same basic technique. So different teachers will condense the curriculum and teach what they think is important. Hankido does exactly that it teaches a base amount of techniques then theaches different combinations of them.
    Last edited by svt2026; 5/12/2009 4:27pm at .
  3. goingd is offline

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    Posted On:
    5/12/2009 11:59pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Taekwondo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    That's about the answer I thought I'd get. Thanks for actually replying.
  4. migo is offline

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    Posted On:
    5/14/2009 7:19am


     Style: Baboo Baby

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Well, "true" confuses the issue a bit. Might be easier to answer if you had said "good"
  5. svt2026 is offline

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    Posted On:
    5/14/2009 7:27am


     Style: hapkido

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    To me true Hapkido is good, and that would mean there would be a lot of different techniques thought and not cut down by the teacher. Let the student decide what he/she likes and works for them.
  6. Vorpal is offline
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    Posted On:
    5/14/2009 8:21am

    Join us... or die
     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I studied Hapkido in Korea. The pace of training was much faster than in the states and you were shown multiple new techniques every day. I kept a detailed training log that had every techniques I was taught, including drawings, that I scribbled madly directly after each class. About seven months in my instructor asked me what the book was for. I showed it to him expecting him to be duly impressed. He laughed at the book and asked my if I was going to carry it with me, pantomiming taking a break from a fight to reference a page. He handed it back and told me its great to be familiar with a lot of techniques but to fight you needed very few. He suggested I pick the three or four that I felt most comfortable with.
  7. svt2026 is offline

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    Posted On:
    5/14/2009 9:07am


     Style: hapkido

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Vorpal View Post
    I studied Hapkido in Korea. The pace of training was much faster than in the states and you were shown multiple new techniques every day. I kept a detailed training log that had every techniques I was taught, including drawings, that I scribbled madly directly after each class. About seven months in my instructor asked me what the book was for. I showed it to him expecting him to be duly impressed. He laughed at the book and asked my if I was going to carry it with me, pantomiming taking a break from a fight to reference a page. He handed it back and told me its great to be familiar with a lot of techniques but to fight you needed very few. He suggested I pick the three or four that I felt most comfortable with.
    LOL, I made the same book of techniques. I just use it if i forgot something, which happens a lot.
  8. goingd is offline

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    Posted On:
    5/14/2009 12:16pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Taekwondo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by migo View Post
    Well, "true" confuses the issue a bit. Might be easier to answer if you had said "good"
    Yyyyeah, forgive me?
  9. goingd is offline

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    Posted On:
    5/14/2009 12:20pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Taekwondo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Vorpal View Post
    I studied Hapkido in Korea. The pace of training was much faster than in the states and you were shown multiple new techniques every day. I kept a detailed training log that had every techniques I was taught, including drawings, that I scribbled madly directly after each class. About seven months in my instructor asked me what the book was for. I showed it to him expecting him to be duly impressed. He laughed at the book and asked my if I was going to carry it with me, pantomiming taking a break from a fight to reference a page. He handed it back and told me its great to be familiar with a lot of techniques but to fight you needed very few. He suggested I pick the three or four that I felt most comfortable with.
    Hahah. I used to think that in order to understand martial arts you had to master every type of style. Growing into it more I know well that the simpler the better. To me there is a big difference between watering down a curriculum and distilling one. I like what your instructor said. There may be fifty good ways to put someone in an arm lock, but in the fight - if you even use an arm lock - you're only going to use one of them.
  10. DerAuslander is offline
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    Valiant Monk of Booze & War

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    Posted On:
    5/15/2009 3:35pm

    supporting memberstaff
     Style: BJJ/C-JKD/KAAALIII!!!!!!!

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by goingd View Post
    GM Choi covered thousands of techniques all together.
    You sure about that?
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