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  1. dwkfym is offline
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    Yours truly

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    Posted On:
    3/30/2009 10:46pm

    Business Class Supporting Member
     PDS Rifles Style: Univ. Florida Kickboxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Gap closing, patience, countering

    Bummed out about having my first IKF fight canceled on me. My second opportunity is too close to my final examinations :(

    Most of the times, when I close the gap people with longer reach close up, giving me an opportunity to work up and down. I usually move forward and right, away from their power hand.

    My trainer taught me to keep my eyes open and read punches when closed up behind my wall, thats helped me from getting uppercuts every time I come in low. I'll keep working on that, I think I'm starting to roll with punches that way. Today I found myself parrying with forearms and elbows behind my peekaboo wall and working off return punches from there, as I closed up and defended against flurry of combos.

    Last session I tried to work on staying up, slipping, stepping sideways and not ducking low as I come in. Against advanced opponents I just get corner cut off with a hook.

    Do you have any suggestions on what to do from there? Any angles from moving inside (toward my opponents power hand)?

    Last session sunday i started to employ cutting off side movements against a newer opponent, with lead leg right kicks as he moved away from my power hand. I noticed when I cut him off like that, he usually presents me with some angles to work on with my rear (left) hand.

    I still don't quite get feeling out my opponent and working on counters. Argh. I feel like I need to wait more before starting a counter, because I just try to counter off the kid's jab. Maybe wait until he throws something more than just a jab. With more advanced opponents, When I do see an opportunity at the end of his combo my body is off position to initiate an attack. What can I work on to prevent this? What is the best way to cut off the combo? (leg kicks?)

    Please let me know if you know an drills I can do, or if I can work on next sparring session.

    Bummed out the fight got canceled. I wish my camera worked, I wanted to watch it and review what I can do because I feel like I can't see what I'm doing.

    Here is a video of a sparring warm-up session. I didn't get the rest of the session on my camera. Both opponents are inexperienced, so I get away with ducking so much and being impatient to attack --which is what I am frustrated with. I didn't get the actual boxing/kickboxing session because my camera puked out

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4wMDw...e=channel_page


    PS: I'm a southpaw. Also, this is an edited version of the email I sent to my instructors at my club.
    Sorry, I guess my questions are ambigious. Here is a summary
    1. Closing gap and diagonal movements to close distance
    2. Working on "being patient" "feeling opponent out" "countering" and looking for opportunities
    Last edited by dwkfym; 3/30/2009 11:12pm at .
  2. dwkfym is offline
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    Yours truly

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    Posted On:
    3/31/2009 9:09am

    Business Class Supporting Member
     PDS Rifles Style: Univ. Florida Kickboxing

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Is the answer, "Train more" ? lol
  3. Sang is offline
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    Posted On:
    3/31/2009 9:24am


     Style: MMA, Yoga

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    **** yeah southpaw! :) The trick for us getting inside an opponent (in MT) is to step over their front leg (diagonal right from your p.o.v) and throw a straight into their face or body when they throw a jab then continue with a right hook. Can't access that youtube in China but people are bound to offer more advice based on it.

    And train more :P.
  4. WhiteShark is offline
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    1% Shark is better than you.

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    Posted On:
    4/16/2009 10:02am

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     Style: BJJ/Shidokan

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    The answer is be LESS patient. Always be first. If you can't be first hit him before his hand returns to his guard position.

    Example: He jabs. Your goal is to hit him on that jab side before his hand is back to his face.
  5. Torakaka is offline
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    Do you eat breakfast?

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    Posted On:
    4/16/2009 11:02am

    supporting member
     Style: Kitty Pow Pow!!!

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by WhiteShark View Post
    The answer is be LESS patient. Always be first. If you can't be first hit him before his hand returns to his guard position.

    Example: He jabs. Your goal is to hit him on that jab side before his hand is back to his face.
    Beat me to it. Being a counter fighter does not mean waiting on your opponent. You set traps for your opponent by maneuvering them in ways that put them where you want them.

    As far as the video goes, you're looking for the punch too much and then reaching for it. Also when you slip/evade incoming jabs you're either moving back or staying in the same position. Always be trying to use their miss as an opportunity to move in. Being a counter puncher is about taking advantage of their mistakes. If you're going to slip, it should be followed up by a punch of your own. The whole point of slipping vs parrying is giving you that opportunity to simultaneously return with your own strikes.

    Another thing is that you're simply circling aimlessly around your opponent. Every move you make should be intended to put you in a better position for setting up a strike. Particularly if you're a shorter fighter, you want to keep yourself in the "pocket", where you're at the sweet spot for your own range and just inside theirs. This is more difficult doing something like a jab drill, but can still be worked if you can slip inside effectively.

    Remember, everything you do should have the purpose of putting you in a position where you can effectively attack your opponent. Try not to let yourself get moved around by your opponent, all movements should be part of your own strategy.
    Ranked #9 internationally at 118lbs by WIKBA http://www.womenkickboxing.com/wikba...rch%202009.htm
  6. dwkfym is offline
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    Posted On:
    4/16/2009 6:33pm

    Business Class Supporting Member
     PDS Rifles Style: Univ. Florida Kickboxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Thanks for the advice everyone
    Looking for the punch too much? I don't understand.

    Note about the video: I've toned down my aggression a lot so I could figure out these things I'm asking about. My speed is generally much faster than these guys so I don't feel like I learn anything (the two guys are the less experienced guys in the advanced class) if I just overwhelm them. Regardless, I think doing that shows where I am lacking very well.

    Whiteshark, are you talking about timing myself better? Do I need to work on my defense so I could be more composed to throw the proper counter?

    I guess its hard to give bulletproof advice whithout seeing more..
    Last edited by dwkfym; 4/16/2009 6:37pm at .

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