223932 Bullies, 3948 online  
  • Register
Our Sponsors:

Results 661 to 670 of 1046
Page 67 of 105 FirstFirst ... 17576364656667 6869707177 ... LastLast
Sponsored Links Spacer Image
  1. slideyfoot is offline
    slideyfoot's Avatar

    Artemis BJJ Co-Founder/Instructor

    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Bristol, UK
    Posts
    2,489

    Posted On:
    11/09/2009 7:43am

    Business Class Supporting Membersupporting member
     Artemis BJJ | Brazilian Jiu Jitsu in Bristol Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by sapateiro View Post
    A) Haven't learned to relax yet so are more prone to injury yourself & others.

    B) Will probably end up muscling on the 3 or 4 techniques that you know so will get into a habit pattern of using strength (also injury is more likely).

    C) Will be surrounded by other newbies all going for the almighty tap, and as soon as frustration starts, strength & aggression starts to take over.
    That all sounds like sensible reasoning (I intentionally missed out the last point, as it leads onto a different topic), and it applicable to all BJJ schools, not just the Gracie Academy. When I was at the Roger Gracie Academy, they didn't let beginners free spar either.

    However, they were permitted to do specific sparring. E.g., one person in guard, the other trying to pass, restarting if someone is submitted, swept or passed. Is that not a viable option?

    Or alternately, have beginners spar, but without submissions, just working for position instead. That way, they at least get familiar with firm resistance.
  2. sapateiro is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Cape Town
    Posts
    105

    Posted On:
    11/09/2009 8:25am


     Style: BJJ/GJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by slideyfoot View Post
    However, they were permitted to do specific sparring. E.g., one person in guard, the other trying to pass, restarting if someone is submitted, swept or passed. Is that not a viable option?
    I see the worth in positional sparring like that & we do it in the advanced classes, but the white belts are training self defense against an unskilled attacker... Therefore he won't be trying to pass your guard or submit you. He'll be trying to punch you in the face or slam you, and that's our focus initially.
  3. slideyfoot is offline
    slideyfoot's Avatar

    Artemis BJJ Co-Founder/Instructor

    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Bristol, UK
    Posts
    2,489

    Posted On:
    11/09/2009 8:40am

    Business Class Supporting Membersupporting member
     Artemis BJJ | Brazilian Jiu Jitsu in Bristol Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by sapateiro View Post
    He'll be trying to punch you in the face or slam you, and that's our focus initially.
    Fair enough, although perhaps guard is a bad example. You could also do specific sparring from mount, with one person trying to reverse, the other looking to maintain their position.

    That reminds me. Over the months I've been running through the course for my girlfriend, she has had problems with mount escapes. Two things in particular: first, getting my leg into position in order to trap it. E.g., she'll sometimes push with her hand, releasing her hold in the punch block variation to do so.

    Second, she also has difficulty bridging, and worries that she is straining her back. We've gone through the videos numerous times, but lacking qualified supervision and full resistance, it's difficult.

    I feel both of those problems could be ironed out if she was in a proper class, rolling with other beginners. Having to adjust to a range of different people, attempting the technique against resistance over and over again, getting pointers from her partners, an instructor on hand to answer questions and provide physical feedback: all of that would result in her upa becoming much more effective.

    Though I should qualify that by saying it would also help if she had someone more qualified than a nooby blue like me to help her, and if she did it more regularly. We're only up to Lesson 5 since starting in July this year. Also, she has no problems with the Americana or positional control from mount, so it does depend on the lesson.
  4. Don Gwinn is offline
    Don Gwinn's Avatar

    BJJ wins again!

    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Virden, IL
    Posts
    3,569

    Posted On:
    11/09/2009 10:09am

    supporting member
     Style: Guns

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I'm starting to wonder about this. I'd like something I could do at home with my boys until we get the time/money to resume at the Gracie Barra school, and even at that point, something to use as a supplement at home. They need to do something structured.

    My concern is that we would be doing this at home without instruction in person or other people to roll with. They're twins and would have each other to drill with, at least, but I've got no prospect of finding anyone near my size anytime soon. I'm also concerned at what it would be like for them to start training at a school after having been "home-schooled" with dad and a DVD set. Would complacency set in as they got good at these drills? Would they strut into a school and be surprised when they got plowed by white belts? Knowing my boys, I think they might.

    On the other hand, their school is not safe and they need something. Judo is cheap and widely available everywhere but here, and even if we had the money right now (we don't) driving 45 minutes home from the city where the school is located to pick them up and drive 45 minutes back, then doing our classes and driving home in time to dump them in bed is not really an appealing thought.

    Just drilling to slip a haymaker and move into a takedown and take mount would put them far beyond most of the bullies in their school, and we've done some of that without outside guidance, but I'm not really qualified to teach.

    The biggest catch with using something like this would be keeping a clear assessment of your own abilities and the limitations of the program. I suspect that most people who buy it go into it thinking that they will do exactly that, but that most people eventually find that they have inflated their own prowess and come to rely too much on the DVD system.
    *********************************************
  5. slideyfoot is offline
    slideyfoot's Avatar

    Artemis BJJ Co-Founder/Instructor

    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Bristol, UK
    Posts
    2,489

    Posted On:
    11/09/2009 10:27am

    Business Class Supporting Membersupporting member
     Artemis BJJ | Brazilian Jiu Jitsu in Bristol Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Don Gwinn View Post
    I'm starting to wonder about this. I'd like something I could do at home with my boys until we get the time/money to resume at the Gracie Barra school, and even at that point, something to use as a supplement at home. They need to do something structured.
    Depending on how old they are, the Gracie Academy is releasing a kids version, called 'Bullyproof'. Hopefully I'll be able to get my hands on that when it comes out, as I'd love to compare it to Gracie Combatives.
  6. Diesel_tke is offline
    Diesel_tke's Avatar

    Light Heavyweight

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pensacola, FL
    Posts
    4,006

    Posted On:
    11/09/2009 2:15pm

    supporting member
     Style: stick,Taiji, mountainbike

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Sley View Post
    You should all wear black belts then. Since your all instructors to each other.

    Well, if you want to be technical about it, I bought was given a black Kurtka a couple of years ago and it came with a black belt!! It is a little small on me, so one of the guys I roll with wears it, but we joke about how who ever is wearing it at the time is a black belt!!
  7. Diesel_tke is offline
    Diesel_tke's Avatar

    Light Heavyweight

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pensacola, FL
    Posts
    4,006

    Posted On:
    11/09/2009 2:24pm

    supporting member
     Style: stick,Taiji, mountainbike

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Don Gwinn View Post
    I'm starting to wonder about this. I'd like something I could do at home with my boys until we get the time/money to resume at the Gracie Barra school, and even at that point, something to use as a supplement at home. They need to do something structured.

    My concern is that we would be doing this at home without instruction in person or other people to roll with. They're twins and would have each other to drill with, at least, but I've got no prospect of finding anyone near my size anytime soon. I'm also concerned at what it would be like for them to start training at a school after having been "home-schooled" with dad and a DVD set. Would complacency set in as they got good at these drills? Would they strut into a school and be surprised when they got plowed by white belts? Knowing my boys, I think they might.

    On the other hand, their school is not safe and they need something. Judo is cheap and widely available everywhere but here, and even if we had the money right now (we don't) driving 45 minutes home from the city where the school is located to pick them up and drive 45 minutes back, then doing our classes and driving home in time to dump them in bed is not really an appealing thought.

    Just drilling to slip a haymaker and move into a takedown and take mount would put them far beyond most of the bullies in their school, and we've done some of that without outside guidance, but I'm not really qualified to teach.

    The biggest catch with using something like this would be keeping a clear assessment of your own abilities and the limitations of the program. I suspect that most people who buy it go into it thinking that they will do exactly that, but that most people eventually find that they have inflated their own prowess and come to rely too much on the DVD system.

    How old are your kids? I have my kids out on the mats with me and the other guys all the time. My kids are 6 and 3. They don't learn submissions, just positional rolling, and generally I just play with them on the mats so that they get to learn how to move their body out of positions.

    The Gracie Academy had said before that they generally like to just teach positional rolling at first. But my older son has been taking a lot of interest in the videos while I'm going through them. I think I will start him on it in about a year.
  8. sapateiro is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Cape Town
    Posts
    105

    Posted On:
    11/09/2009 3:48pm


     Style: BJJ/GJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by slideyfoot View Post
    Fair enough, although perhaps guard is a bad example. You could also do specific sparring from mount, with one person trying to reverse, the other looking to maintain their position.
    That's a good example - and it's done at the end of the beginners 'maintaining topmount' class, so in that respect, yes, there is sparring for the beginners.


    Quote Originally Posted by slideyfoot View Post
    That reminds me. Over the months I've been running through the course for my girlfriend, she has had problems with mount escapes. Two things in particular: first, getting my leg into position in order to trap it. E.g., she'll sometimes push with her hand, releasing her hold in the punch block variation to do so.

    Second, she also has difficulty bridging, and worries that she is straining her back. We've gone through the videos numerous times, but lacking qualified supervision and full resistance, it's difficult.
    I agree that nothing can replace a live instructor in terms of being able to feel the problems & help students work through them. To help with those particular issues a little:

    A) Trapping the foot: Perhaps instead of placing her trapping foot flat on the ground, she could angle that knee away from the opponent & use the flat of the foot to push the opponents ankle. This often enables the foot to get higher and the trap to be more robust.

    B) Bridging: The closer the feet are to your butt, the higher the bridge. This can be further enhanced by going onto the toes in a training environment. There should be very little strength involved if the focus is up (with a slight angle towards the rolling side <say 20 degrees>, and no effort made to roll the opponent sideways until fully bridged (I like his head to touch the floor before thinking about a sideways movement). Don't forget to ensure that the non trapping foot is in-between the opponents feet so he doesn't accidently 'get a hook in'. The roll should be onto the shoulder and no strain put on the neck or traps.

    I hope this helps, feel free to PM me if she wants more help.

    Quote Originally Posted by slideyfoot View Post
    I feel both of those problems could be ironed out if she was in a proper class, rolling with other beginners. Having to adjust to a range of different people, attempting the technique against resistance over and over again, getting pointers from her partners, an instructor on hand to answer questions and provide physical feedback: all of that would result in her upa becoming much more effective.
    I agree. Nothing beats a real class with live instruction... Provided it's quality instruction ;-)
    Last edited by sapateiro; 11/09/2009 3:52pm at .
  9. Sley is offline

    mr. Hobbes

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    1,390

    Posted On:
    11/09/2009 10:20pm


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I begin to understand more whats the real plan at a Gracie academy, its hard for me to imagine not sparring, as I'm at a Carlson Sr. linage school in chicago... the idea of not always going all out just sounds crazy, crazy but smart though, I personally would perfer to drill more often and focus less on sparring but what do you know that doesn't always happen.
  10. rangerdavy is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    254

    Posted On:
    11/10/2009 8:54pm


     Style: BJJ, MMA

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    The idea of always going all out seems crazy, also. People tend to learn best with a mixture of the two extremes.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Powered by vBulletin™© contact@vbulletin.com vBulletin Solutions, Inc. 2011 All rights reserved.