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  1. TheRuss is offline
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    Posted On:
    6/03/2009 12:09am

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Biochemistry final's on Thursday.

    YouTube - Europe - The Final Countdown (Live)

    ... yeah, that's right.

    Question for an especially ambitious reader: are D-glucose and L-glucose enantiomers or C-5 epimers?

    ---

    Ophthalmologist was a bust. He's referred me to a second neurologist, which is probably going to be another three to six month wait (assuming he even remembers to do the referral). I'm probably going to push my GP to give me the all-clear so I can resume weight training (under the watchful eye of my physiotherapist).
    Quote Originally Posted by Emevas View Post
    Downstreet on the flip-flop, timepants.
  2. TheRuss is offline
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    Posted On:
    6/03/2009 12:44am

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Also, speaking of carbohydrates...

    Fructose degradation , sometimes called fructolysis, is carried out in the liver. In the first step, fructose is phosphorylated by fructokinase, which uses ATP as a cosubstrate. This yields fructose-1-phosphate. The latter is then cleaved by aldolase B, which is found mainly in the liver, in keeping with the liver's prominent role in fructose degradation. The products of this reaction are dihydroxyacetone phosphate, which is a metabolite in glycolysis, and glyceraldehyde. Finally, glyceraldehyde is phosphorylated (using ATP) by glyceraldehyde kinase. This yields glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate, which again is an intermediate of glycolysis (Figure 4.1-2).

    Glyceraldehyde can alternatively be utilized by conversion to glycerol, and subsequently to glycerol-1-phosphate. The latter is a substrate in the synthesis of triacylglycerol, that is fat. Fructose and sucrose appear to promote obesity more strongly than equivalent amounts of starch or glucose; if that is the case, the utilization via glycerol-1-phosphate may be among the reasons.
    - http://watcut.uwaterloo.ca/webnotes/.../page-4.1.html

    Interesting theory.
    Quote Originally Posted by Emevas View Post
    Downstreet on the flip-flop, timepants.
  3. TheRuss is offline
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    Posted On:
    6/04/2009 11:19am

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    Sometimes life is good.

    Breakfast:
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    Quote Originally Posted by Emevas View Post
    Downstreet on the flip-flop, timepants.
  4. Kintanon is offline
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    Posted On:
    6/04/2009 12:04pm

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    I was sure the Ophthalmologist would be able to help.>:\ I can't imagine much more a neurologist could do for you outside of recommending surgery or something.
  5. TheRuss is offline
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    Posted On:
    6/04/2009 12:25pm

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kintanon View Post
    I was sure the Ophthalmologist would be able to help.>:\
    Well, the dude apparently wasn't a neuro-ophthalmologist - he was strictly concerned with the eyeball proper. His assistant also didn't pay attention when I told her I was 20/10 last time I got my acuity tested, which led to this exchange:

    Him: "Your visual acuity is 20/20, so there's nothing wrong with your eyes."
    Me: "... last time I had it tested, it was 20/10."
    Him: *blank stare*
    Me: "That's a fifty percent deterioration."
    Him: "There were no abnormalities in your eyes."

    Of course there's nothing physically wrong with my eyes. It was a judo throw, not a freakin' eye gouge. But I'm still getting optical symptoms (double-vision/blurriness/astigmatism in left eye, photosensitivity). And apparently those are "not his department".

    Quote Originally Posted by Kintanon View Post
    I can't imagine much more a neurologist could do for you outside of recommending surgery or something.
    I am hoping that the new neurologist will be competent enough to put the pieces of the puzzle together. I've seen a bunch of different people about this, and most of them are so fixated on their narrow little area of interest that they don't even look at the borders of it. I need one question answered:

    What do the symptoms I am experiencing in certain circumstances imply about the effects these circumstances have on my brain?

    (Meaning: is lifting weights going to make me dumber?)

    Nobody's thinking in those terms, though. They're all thinking "what can I tell this guy that will stop him from wasting resources and protect me from a malpractice lawsuit with the least effort possible on my part?"
    Quote Originally Posted by Emevas View Post
    Downstreet on the flip-flop, timepants.
  6. muddy is offline

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    Posted On:
    6/05/2009 2:41pm


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    Quote Originally Posted by TheRuss View Post
    ...
    Nobody's thinking in those terms, though. They're all thinking "what can I tell this guy that will stop him from wasting resources and protect me from a malpractice lawsuit with the least effort possible on my part?"
    I actually had a lot of respect for Canadian healthcare (some US healthcare critics point to it as a shining example) till I read this thread. Head injury, double vision, and photosenstivity seems to me should be enough get you to the top of the list for the right doctor ... Is it possible to find a private specialist near you and cough up the cash for an office visit at least? I would think it would be worth it in the situation you describe.
  7. TheRuss is offline
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    Posted On:
    6/05/2009 8:16pm

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    Quote Originally Posted by muddy View Post
    Head injury, double vision, and photosenstivity seems to me should be enough get you to the top of the list for the right doctor ...
    The problem has two parts:
    1) I'm probably not going to get any worse.
    2) They don't think they can help me get any better.

    As such, I'm getting a lot of nothing. If they thought I was at risk of a significant deterioration, they'd be working to prevent that. Conversely, if they were convinced that it's not merely PCS and therefore untreatable, I might have been able to convince one of them to work with me.

    So it's not like this for everyone in all circumstances. Still sucks for me, though.

    Quote Originally Posted by muddy View Post
    Is it possible to find a private specialist near you and cough up the cash for an office visit at least?
    Nope. There might be some in other provinces, but I'm pretty sure that doing what you've described is against the law here.
    Last edited by TheRuss; 6/05/2009 8:19pm at .
    Quote Originally Posted by Emevas View Post
    Downstreet on the flip-flop, timepants.
  8. ZeroSleep is offline

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    Posted On:
    6/08/2009 6:45pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Only gotten to page 7 so far, but I must say it's one of the most rewarding threads I've read so far. Very interesting to read, as I'm not smart enough to figure this stuff out for myself. It did make me think though, because one of those things in your tripod is rest.

    How, and how much, do you think a sleep disorder would screw up the triangle? More specifically, delayed sleep phase disorder/syndrome when you have to get up at regular time (about 7 AM) anyways, or 6 AM to get some training done before school/work, resulting in no more than four hours sleep every night, some times less. (Excluding weekends.)

    How it would affect training health, general physical health and mental health.

    As you may have figured, I have this condition myself, and I'm curious as to how much this has actually affected my life in general, and my training specifically.

    Because for a couple of years I used the diagnose as a crutch to, well, not give everything 100%, since I didn't get enough sleep and stuff, or sleep longer (past most of the school day) so I would be fully rested for the rest of the day, especially training. While the last year, I have not used it at all, but gotten up at 7 am to go to school, or 6 am to train for 45 min before going to school, no matter if I had a full nights sleep (rare!) or (most common) only about 3 hours.

    Also, if there might be something to do about it to get a more 'normal' life that my doctor might've missed.

    If I've hijacked your thread, feel free to ignore, but I had to ask since you seem like you know your way around studies and the internet, and you've found out for yourself how useless a lot of doctors are.

    Love,
    ZS

    PS: I'd link you to it, but the only page about this I really know of is wiki, and I wouldn't trust that site with my History grade, much less my life.
    Last edited by ZeroSleep; 6/08/2009 6:48pm at . Reason: grammar >_>
  9. TheRuss is offline
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    Posted On:
    6/08/2009 11:16pm

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    Quote Originally Posted by ZeroSleep View Post
    How, and how much, do you think a sleep disorder would screw up the triangle? More specifically, delayed sleep phase disorder/syndrome when you have to get up at regular time (about 7 AM) anyways, or 6 AM to get some training done before school/work, resulting in no more than four hours sleep every night, some times less. (Excluding weekends.)

    How it would affect training health, general physical health and mental health.
    To answer your question, notice that it's not just a triangle, it's a tripod. A fouled-up sleep schedule will thoroughly wreck one's other endeavours, just as surely as knocking a leg out from under a tripod will topple the whole works.

    Quote Originally Posted by ZeroSleep View Post
    As you may have figured, I have this condition myself, and I'm curious as to how much this has actually affected my life in general, and my training specifically.

    Because for a couple of years I used the diagnose as a crutch to, well, not give everything 100%, since I didn't get enough sleep and stuff, or sleep longer (past most of the school day) so I would be fully rested for the rest of the day, especially training. While the last year, I have not used it at all, but gotten up at 7 am to go to school, or 6 am to train for 45 min before going to school, no matter if I had a full nights sleep (rare!) or (most common) only about 3 hours.
    The main thing I'm getting at with the tripod analogy is that neglecting any one of rest, diet and exercise will undermine your efforts. But there are circumstances that you can change, and there are circumstances that you have to take into account and work around. Fix the stuff you can, work around the stuff you can't, and do the best you can.

    Quote Originally Posted by ZeroSleep View Post
    Also, if there might be something to do about it to get a more 'normal' life that my doctor might've missed.
    You might be interested in this post.
    Quote Originally Posted by Emevas View Post
    Downstreet on the flip-flop, timepants.
  10. ZeroSleep is offline

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    Posted On:
    6/09/2009 4:00am

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheRuss View Post
    To answer your question, notice that it's not just a triangle, it's a tripod. A fouled-up sleep schedule will thoroughly wreck one's other endeavours, just as surely as knocking a leg out from under a tripod will topple the whole works.



    The main thing I'm getting at with the tripod analogy is that neglecting any one of rest, diet and exercise will undermine your efforts. But there are circumstances that you can change, and there are circumstances that you have to take into account and work around. Fix the stuff you can, work around the stuff you can't, and do the best you can.



    You might be interested in this post.
    Funny, I had just read that post when I decided to check if you had responded to this. It's interesting, but nothing new, except... Well, I'm really curious about diet and nutrition (thanks for pointing me in the direction of the paleo diet, or was that Jack?), specifically how it would affect my sleep, rest and recovery time. At less than 60 kg for my 1m73, I'm underweight, and possibly skinny-fat despite having had an average of 25+ hours of training a week for over 9 consecutive months, and about 15-20 hours from about 9 months ago to about 2 1/2 years ago.

    As a student I couldn't afford to eat correctly for 3 years, and it was around the beginning of that the dsps really hit me and I got it diagnosed. I wonder if it could just be a symptom of malnutrition, and not necessarily the underlaying (though definitely a) cause of some other problems, like me being a hardgainer, suffer from sleep deprivation, cycles of depression... The more I think about it, the more sense it makes, but... Well, cause -> effect isn't always as straight-forward as we'd like it to be, is it?

    Hmm, I wonder if I could sue Norway for however I turn out.
    Has to move away from home from school at age 16 -> insufficient scholarship -> unhealthy diet in more ways than one -> sleep disorder sets in -> depression -> might not get grades in school because of lack of attending classes because not enough sleep -> stress, worry and depressions follow, the sleep disorder gets worse -> depressions and general hopelessness = no motivation -> flunks school, bad general health, migraines and depressions.

    Wonder what's screwed me over the most so far, and if the cause-effect chain is flawed in any way.

    Lol, and I aspire to be a paramedic in 4 years, and a professional MMA fighter in 8.

    (On a different note, what the hell is this smiley? -> :3some: ? )

    *watches biker mice from mars in an attempt not to fall asleep since it's 11 am, no sleep tonight* >_>

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