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  1. Wounded Ronin is offline
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    Posted On:
    2/16/2009 4:48pm

    supporting member
     Style: German longsword, .45 ACP

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Help me understand my Mini 14 manual...

    So, my Mini 14 hits a little to the left, so I've been trying to adjust the sights. I'm reading the manual, and there's a warning I can't understand.

    DO NOT TIGHTEN THE COMBINATION WINDAGE AND LOCKING SCREW WITH THE APERTURE NOT IN THE HALF TURN POSITION AS THIS WILL DAMAGE THREADS OF THE APERTURE.
    I really am not sure what that means. Can anyone restate it for me using more colloquial language?

    Thanks very much.
    “nobody shoots anybody in the face unless you’re a hit man or a video gamer.” - Jack Thompson
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Th...%28attorney%29
  2. Planktime is offline

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    Posted On:
    2/20/2009 12:31pm


     Style: Arnis, judo, Taichi

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    DO NOT TIGHTEN THE COMBINATION WINDAGE AND LOCKING SCREW WITH THE APERTURE NOT IN THE HALF TURN POSITION AS THIS WILL DAMAGE THREADS OF THE APERTURE.

    Ok so not looking at the gun I would guess that the windage adjustment has a locking system that is set to hold it in place to prevent bumping it off. I would call Ruger and ask them though I would also suggest they follow the below suggestion

    :englishmo
  3. joecos is offline
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    Posted On:
    2/20/2009 1:32pm


     Style: Karate, BJJ

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by ruger mini ranch manual
    ELEVATION ADJUSTMENT:
    1. Loosen one of the Combination Windage Adjustment and Locking Screws one
    full turn (either one is fine, however, loosen only one so that the original
    windage adjustment is maintained).
    2. Adjust the aperture by rotating it in half turn increments. Rotating the
    aperture clockwise will move the aperture down (and therefore the point of
    impact down as well). Rotating the aperture counter-clockwise will move the
    aperture up (and therefore the point of impact up). (See Figures 17A and
    17B.) Rotating the aperture a single half turn (180 degrees) will move the
    point of impact approximately 1.25 inches at 100 yards.
    3. Tighten the Combination Windage Adjustment and Locking Screw that was
    loosened in Step One (See Figures 17A and 17B). The Aperture will move
    against the other screw and will be aligned to the half turn position.
    WARNING: DO NOT TIGHTEN THE COMBINATION WINDAGE AND LOCKING
    SCREW WITH THE APERTURE NOT IN THE HALF TURN POSITION AS THIS
    WILL DAMAGE THREADS OF THE APERTURE.
    I believe this is the portion of the manual to which you are referring. If I am reading it correctly, they want you to move the aperture only in half turn increments -- IE no quarter turn or 1/8 turn. I believe they are saying if you tighten the locking screw after having moved the aperture less or more than a multiple of 1/2 (1, 1 1/2, etc) turns, you will strip the threads.
  4. Wounded Ronin is offline
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    Posted On:
    2/20/2009 7:24pm

    supporting member
     Style: German longsword, .45 ACP

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I see. That makes sense. Thanks for your input.
    “nobody shoots anybody in the face unless you’re a hit man or a video gamer.” - Jack Thompson
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Th...%28attorney%29

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