222364 Bullies, 4388 online  
  • Register
Our Sponsors:

Results 1 to 10 of 18
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Sponsored Links Spacer Image
  1. cuatro76 is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Dallas
    Posts
    928

    Posted On:
    1/20/2009 1:25pm


     Style: Judo, BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Micro-loading for weight training

    Do any of you guys micro-load when weight training? I've been doing the Stronglifts 5X5 program for 2 months now and have started to hit some walls. I lift weights at the YMCA by my house, and the smallest plate they have is the standard 2.5 lb, making the minimum increase 5 lbs at a time. Also a spotter is not always available.

    So after some research I thought I'd start micro-loading, using .5 lb steel washers. This allows me to add 1 lb at a time. It seems to be working. It is definitely helping my bench press and overhead press.

    So I guess I want to know who here micro-loads and how successful they've been with it. Do muscles respond better to smaller weight increases or larger weight increases to build strength? Recovery has definitely been easier but is that a sign that I'm not making big enough increases? Also will micro-loading emphasize Myofibrillar hypertrophy or sarcoplasmic hypertrophy? Are my muscles actually getting stronger or am I comfortably gaining more control/activation of existing muscle fibers?

    Lots of questions I guess. Any feedback is appreciated.
  2. TheRuss is offline
    TheRuss's Avatar

    is badder than you

    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Not Canada
    Posts
    4,334

    Posted On:
    1/20/2009 1:32pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: None

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Well, as someone who still isn't really converted to the "leave one rep in the tank" school of thought, my thoughts on the subject are as follows:

    Lifting x+y pounds* > lifting x pounds

    * where x and y are greater than 0 and all other factors (form, reps, training goals, etc.) are the same

    Even if y is small, x+y is better than just x.

    I don't really have any science or research to back that belief up, but given that "it seems to be working" and "recovery has definitely been easier", you're probably on the right track.

    Questions of hypertrophy/CNS development probably have more to do with your program structure as a whole than how big your increases in resistance are.
    Quote Originally Posted by Emevas View Post
    Downstreet on the flip-flop, timepants.
  3. cuatro76 is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Dallas
    Posts
    928

    Posted On:
    1/20/2009 1:58pm


     Style: Judo, BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Thanks Russ. The x+y analogy is good. I think it fits the 5x5 routine, for me at least. I'm lanky and have never been able to really pack on lots of muscle. So whether I'm actually gaining mass or just existing muscle recruitment through micro-loading I should just accept that it's working. Since this a new approach to lifting for me (I never even heard of micro-loading till a few weeks ago) I'm just looking for input/advice.
  4. mike321 is online now

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    California
    Posts
    1,438

    Posted On:
    1/20/2009 2:13pm


     Style: kenpo, Wrestling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I had a workout partner much stronger than me. He was hitting plateaus and I was curious if micro-loading would help. I bought some 1.5 lb plates but he laughed off the whole idea so i never found out if it would help. Interested if this works. Let us know.
  5. Emevas is offline
    Emevas's Avatar

    Dysfunctionally Strong

    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Minot AFB, ND
    Posts
    6,788

    Posted On:
    1/20/2009 4:51pm

    supporting member
     Style: Boxing/Wrestling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Personally, I'm not the biggest fan of the microloading approach, as I think that hitting a plat is more a sign that some aspect of the program needs to change rather than the solution being that you need to add increasinly smaller amounts of weight. Usually, when I hit a plat, I break my routine and technique down and try to find where the problem is. Usually, it's something simple like a need to deload or reset. Sometimes, it can be a lagging muscle group that's bringing the whole works down. Sometimes a change in volume may be necessary, or a completely different routine structure.

    I feel like the time spent microloading could be better invested, unless you're already a 800lb squatter.
    "Emevas,
    You're a scrapper, I like that."-Ronin69
  6. cuatro76 is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Dallas
    Posts
    928

    Posted On:
    1/20/2009 7:02pm


     Style: Judo, BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I'm guessing the Judo+BJJ+weights is keeping me from lifting heavier amounts than if I just did weights. My schedule is:

    Monday - lift a.m. Judo p.m.
    Tuesday - BJJ p.m.
    Wednesday - Lift p.m.
    Thursday - BJJ a.m. Judo p.m.
    Friday - lift
    Weekend - Rest, maybe swim, maybe add another grappling session.

    So for my schedule I might need to keep micro-loading, at least until it seems like the 5x5 has gotten me as far as it can. I want to stick with it for a few more months before switching to something else. I do feel it is improving my lifting technique, especially ass-to grass squats and deadlifts.
  7. Emevas is offline
    Emevas's Avatar

    Dysfunctionally Strong

    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Minot AFB, ND
    Posts
    6,788

    Posted On:
    1/20/2009 8:19pm

    supporting member
     Style: Boxing/Wrestling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Does the Stronglifts 5x5 call for ATG squatting? From what I'm reading in the article, it advocates low bar squatting instead.
    "Emevas,
    You're a scrapper, I like that."-Ronin69
  8. cuatro76 is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Dallas
    Posts
    928

    Posted On:
    1/21/2009 12:09am


     Style: Judo, BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Low bar squats torque my shoulders in a bad way. So I tend to stay higher on my traps with the bar. From what I've read in the 5x5 manual I downloaded it isn't really specified. But the manual also says to increase by 5lbs each session, too. Mainly it's the bench and overhead press that I'm stalling on with 5lb increases. So that's why I looked into micro-loading.
  9. honesty is offline
    honesty's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Somerset, UK
    Posts
    1,060

    Posted On:
    1/21/2009 3:17am


     Style: SAMBO

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Nope it definitely says low bar squats to (or just below) parallel. If you get problems with your shoulders, stretch by doing shoulder dislocations beforehand. http://stronglifts.com/shoulders-dislocations/

    Also, if your stalling the manual does going into a soft/hard deload process, have you tried this?
  10. Teh El Macho is offline
    Teh El Macho's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Porcupine/Hollywood, FL & Parmistan via Elbonia
    Posts
    11,762

    Posted On:
    1/21/2009 6:48am

    supporting member
     Style: creonte on hiatus

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Emevas
    Does the Stronglifts 5x5 call for ATG squatting? From what I'm reading in the article, it advocates low bar squatting instead.
    It calls for low bar squatting, but I'd assume it's flexible.

    Quote Originally Posted by cuatro76
    Low bar squats torque my shoulders in a bad way. So I tend to stay higher on my traps with the bar. From what I've read in the 5x5 manual I downloaded it isn't really specified. But the manual also says to increase by 5lbs each session, too. Mainly it's the bench and overhead press that I'm stalling on with 5lb increases. So that's why I looked into micro-loading.
    That calls for internal (AND possibly external) shoulder rotation flexibility exercises as well as upper thoracic mobility drills. The stronglifts site actually has a good article on this subject.

    As for the increases, if you are hitting a plateau, deload, reset, or temporary use an exercise variation that it's mechanically at an advantage or disadvantage.

    For example, if you squat with feet shoulder-width apart, try squatting with legs closer together (greater difficulty) or with legs wide open a-la powerlifting (you'll find you can recruit your glutes and hams more this way.) Same with other exercises.

    Sometimes a temporarily small (and yet safe and methodical) variation in stance can compensate for microloading. Look for mechanical changes first, then microloading second. That's how I would approach it.
    Read this for flexibility and injury prevention, this, this and this for supplementation, this on grip conditioning, and this on staph. New: On strenght standards, relationships and structural balance. Shoulder problems? Read this.

    My crapuous vlog and my blog of training, stuff and crap. NEW: Me, Mrs. Macho and our newborn baby.

    New To Weight Training? Get the StrongLifts 5x5 program and Rippetoe's "Starting Strength, 2nd Ed". Wanna build muscle/gain weight? Check this article. My review on Tactical Nutrition here.

    t-nation - Dissecting the deadlift. Anatomy and Muscle Balancing Videos.

    The street argument is retarded. BJJ is so much overkill for the street that its ridiculous. Unless you're the idiot that picks a fight with the high school wrestling team, barring knife or gun play, the opponent shouldn't make it past double leg + ground and pound - Osiris
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Powered by vBulletin™© contact@vbulletin.com vBulletin Solutions, Inc. 2011 All rights reserved.