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  1. sochin101 is offline
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    Graviora Manent

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    Posted On:
    1/08/2009 2:43am

    Join us... or die
     Style: No gym currently.

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by H TO THE IZZO
    Countdown to serious injury in 5... 4... 3...
    Electrocuting Aikidoka isn't serious. It's hilarious injury.


    Quote Originally Posted by ChristopherHein
    I made one. It was weak though. It wouldn't shock through cloths for anything.
    Was the PVC acting as an insulator?

    Also, Chris, did you play the 'A' Team theme while you were making the knife? That is an essential component of every garage-build, ever.
    Where there is only a choice between cowardice and violence, I would advise violence.

    Gandhi

  2. ChristopherHein is offline

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    Posted On:
    1/08/2009 12:23pm


     Style: Aikido

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by sochin101
    Electrocuting Aikidoka isn't serious. It's hilarious injury.
    My students groan everytime they see something new in the dojo. They know it's there to cause them some form of pain, haha.


    Quote Originally Posted by sochin101
    Was the PVC acting as an insulator?

    Also, Chris, did you play the 'A' Team theme while you were making the knife? That is an essential component of every garage-build, ever.
    The copper halves are right next to each other, with only a small gap of air between them. The spark arcs nicely. I don't think there is a problem with connection. I think there is just not enough power in the sucker.

    The stungus electrodes are sharp. My guess is that they are designed this way so they'll poke throught the cloths in order to make good contact, not so with my crappy shock knife.

    And yes, there are few things I build when I don't hum, dun ta dun; dun, dun dun dun. In 1964 a crack commando team....
  3. smillard is offline

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    Posted On:
    1/08/2009 1:07pm


     Style: BJJ/boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by jspeedy
    yeah chalk and a mock blade are probably the most economical way to go. But if you can build your own shock knife for cheap it may have more of a training benefit.
    What additional training benefit are you talking about. As someone that has been subjected to shock knives, even a shock collar (don't ask, was drunk), marker/lipstick covered felt knives, plain old rubber knives and the weighted PVC covered with neoprene (ARMA homemade knives) I never had a "I never knew I got hit" feeling with any of them. The marker/lipstick to me was the most beneficial because you could do an after action review.
  4. jspeedy is offline
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    Posted On:
    1/08/2009 8:22pm


     Style: FMA

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    quote:smillard
    "What additional training benefit are you talking about. As someone that has been subjected to shock knives, even a shock collar (don't ask, was drunk), marker/lipstick covered felt knives, plain old rubber knives and the weighted PVC covered with neoprene (ARMA homemade knives) I never had a "I never knew I got hit" feeling with any of them. The marker/lipstick to me was the most beneficial because you could do an after action review."

    FOr the last time, the benefit i'm talking about is the fear of being shocked- which simulates the stress and fear of a real situation (which may not be all that accurate i'm just thinking here w/ my crackpot theories). As for "I never knew I got hit" i'm talking aboiut accidental contact while disarming the blade that could be considered a cut if the knife were real, or any unintentional contact w/ the blade. But I think i've gotten a pretty good answer from everyone on the subject, lippstick or chalk w/ a fake knive seems sufficient. I just thought maybe some mcguyver out there already came up w/ something to sub. for a $200 shock knife.
  5. ChristopherHein is offline

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    Posted On:
    1/08/2009 8:44pm


     Style: Aikido

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Frank White
    I think using a permanent marker and wearing a really expensive suit would be more realistic.
    That would put the fear in you for sure.
  6. jspeedy is offline
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    Posted On:
    1/08/2009 8:57pm


     Style: FMA

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Damn! anyone know how to make a really expensive suit for cheap. (LOL)!
  7. Echo Unit is offline
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    Posted On:
    1/08/2009 9:53pm


     Style: Aikibujutsu, Shinkendo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    It may sound like I'm being an ass here, but that's because I am.

    If you took the time spend researching and building a shock knife, and instead dedicated that to researching and training knife fighting, you'd be a lot better off.

    People have been great at killing each other with knives for thousands of years before discovering electricity.

    More training, less geeking.
  8. jspeedy is offline
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    Posted On:
    1/08/2009 10:30pm


     Style: FMA

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote:Echo Unit
    It may sound like I'm being an ass here, but that's because I am.

    If you took the time spend researching and building a shock knife, and instead dedicated that to researching and training knife fighting, you'd be a lot better off.

    People have been great at killing each other with knives for thousands of years before discovering electricity.

    More training, less geeking.



    - I ask anyone if they've built a shock knife and now i'm (allegedly) spending all my time doing all this research about shock knives and not training at all. Actually i'm spending my valuable porn viewing time here instead of.... well viewing porn(lol), that or watching talking dogs on youtube.

    - People have also been doing sports for thousands of years. But w/ today's technology athletes can take advantage and make faster progress to achieve better results.

    -guess i'm just a big geek though. I gotta go play world of warcraft now, after that it's dungeons and dragons.
  9. smillard is offline

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    Posted On:
    1/12/2009 12:11pm


     Style: BJJ/boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    FOr the last time, the benefit i'm talking about is the fear of being shocked- which simulates the stress and fear of a real situation (which may not be all that accurate i'm just thinking here w/ my crackpot theories). As for "I never knew I got hit" i'm talking aboiut accidental contact while disarming the blade that could be considered a cut if the knife were real, or any unintentional contact w/ the blade. But I think i've gotten a pretty good answer from everyone on the subject, lippstick or chalk w/ a fake knive seems sufficient. I just thought maybe some mcguyver out there already came up w/ something to sub. for a $200 shock knife.



    First off, since it is knife defense/fighting training not getting "cut" should be a motivatory enough. As far as "incidental cuts" your shock knife won't always give you an exact indicator of that. Any contact with the "contacts" will deliver a shock that if it were a "real knife" either would not deliver a cut or would be anywhere from very minor to something that would require a couple stitches. As I was always taught when dealing with a knife "no matter how good you are, plan on getting cut".

    Finally, as a rule two things I don't play "McGyver" with is safety equipment and electrical devices. I'll home make work out equipment and stuff like that all day, but especially if you are working with someone else the last thing you need is to make an electrical device that could possibly jolt someone enough to affect their CNS or stop their heart or your's. It would be a "Darwin Award" worthy death if it happened to you and a quick road to litigation if you do it to your training partner.
  10. Anna Kovacs is offline
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    Spear Sister

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    Posted On:
    1/12/2009 1:05pm

    supporting membersupporting member
     Style: Dancing the Spears

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    A knife requires a decently commited effort to really tear things up. I don't think that "accidental" contact with the edge is a big deal.

    When I played with knife dueling I was pretty good about leaving nothing to question. If I "stabbed" someone I generally did it about 3-4 times in the stomach and/or neck area with good solid contact .

    I think shock knives would be fun to play with but I don't think that it's necessary that every little contact with the edge be considered anything worth thinking about. I also don't think that making people afraid of getting zapped is going matter much. You don't want to get cut but aggressiveness of action is much more important then trying to dance out of the way until you can seize the prime moment to avoid getting zapped. The latter could be refined to a very good game of knife tag but my opinion is that acting fast and jamming your weapon into someones guts hard at least three or four times is more applicable to using a knife as a weapon and that learning to avoid committed stabs and slashes is more applicable to defending against a knife.


    I will say though that most of my experience playing with weapons is practicing simulating using long stabbing knives in an icepick grip and frankly I feel like getting stabbed is significantly more serious then getting sliced here and there. Using the icepick grip really encourages aggressiveness of action and leaves little to question when someone does actually get stuck. People using blade forward grips often seem to wind up playing snippy snippy gotcha games.

    I think your training mentality is more important then your training tools.
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