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  1. jasculs is offline

    Registered Member

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    Jul 2006
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    Posted On:
    10/24/2008 3:01pm


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    The "Ah Hah!" Moment

    Have you ever been working on a technique over and over again but for some reason you just can't quite get it? Then your instructor walks up to you and says, "Do you have a question?" or "Is there something I can help you with in your technique". Then you explain that you've been working on a technique and you know it works because you've seen many people use it effectively but for some reason you just can't seem to get it right.

    After you show him what you've been doing. He grabs your training partner and then show's you the littlest and simplest detail you could have ever imagined but that "little" detail just made you go "Ah hah!!, Why didn't I think of that?". The simplest thing that he just showed you, now made your technique go from not being as effective to being extremely effective.

    This is a scenario that is very common and it's what I call "Invisible Grappling". It's the details and movements that take your techniques to the next level but for some reason they aren't very obvious. How about I give you some examples:

    Shoulder Walking - The movement where you move your shoulders backwards one shoulder at a time is what I call "shoulder walking". A very common scenario where you will see shoulder walking used effectively is when you are being stacked in your guard. When your opponent starts to stack you before he gets your legs over your face, quickly walk your shoulders backwards as you make your hips heavy. This will make it much harder for them to stack you because you are basically going in the same direction your opponent is taking you. You can also place your hands on your thighs and push on your legs as you shoulder walk backwards to increase the pressure against your opponent. Some scenarios where you can effectively use "shoulder walking" are:
    • When you are getting stacked when attempting an armbar from the guard.
    • When you are getting stacked when attempting a triangle choke from the guard.
    • You are getting stacked when your opponent attempts a double under the leg pass.
    Face Control - If your opponent can not move his/her face then they will not be able to move their body. If their head is stuck looking in a particular direction and they can't move it, you will have a lot of control over them. Let's give some examples.
    • Lets say you have your opponent in side control with your arm under their head and your shoulder pressuring into their face (Shoulder of Justice) forcing them to look away from you. When you do this, they lose the ability to turn their head. They will not be able to turn into you because they can't turn their face.
    • If you have the mount with your arm under their head while applying shoulder pressure forcing their head to turn to one direction preventing them from turning it, they will have a hard time bucking and turning to escape.
    • Next time you get the north south position place a lot of pressure down on your opponent's head with your body pinning it to look sideways and not only will it become very uncomfortable for them but they will have a much harder time escaping.
    Head Control - When you think of head control, what do you think of? You probably just think about grabbing your opponents head or neck and pulling it down so you can get control of it. What details do you think of to make it better? How can you increase the control of your opponent's head? First you don't want to grab your opponent's neck. That's not head control. That's "neck" control. When you control closer to your opponent's neck they will have more of an ability produce force against you and possibly still be able to posture up. The neck has a large amount of muscles in that area. The more muscles in the area you grab the more force your opponent can produce.

    So what do I want you to do? I want you to control right on the back of your opponent's head where there isn't hardly any muscle. When you control by this area you'll will make it much harder for them to posture up. Here are some examples of how you can use this concept effectively.
    • When you're in the clinch with your opponent from standing. Don't grab the back of their neck, grab the back of their head. Take notice the extra amount of leverage you will gain.
    • When you are going for an armbar on the bottom, take the leg that is across your opponent's neck and angle it out towards the back of your opponent's head while you place pressure down. Take notice of how it's much harder for you opponent to posture up and even try to stack you. To compare, you can also place your leg across the back of their neck so you can see how they can posture better and possibly also stack you. This is also one of the reason why you "should not" cross your ankles when going for an armbar from the guard. They isn't any head control.
    • When you work to establish head control of your opponent in an attempt to break your opponent's posture when their in your guard don't grab the back of their neck. Grab behind their head where there isn't much muscle. You'll pull their head down much easier.
    This are just a few concepts of "Invisible Grappling". As you gain more experience you may notice little details that you can use to improve upon what you already know. Always be aware that because you "think" you know something well it doesn't necessarily mean that you can't make it better. There's a reason why you hear others say that it's usually the "little details" that make the biggest difference.

    Thank you and great training to you,
    Jason

    www.GrapplersGuide.com
  2. jasculs is offline

    Registered Member

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    Posted On:
    10/24/2008 3:07pm


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    What other "Ah Hah" moments have you guys experienced.
  3. Goju - Joe is offline
    Goju - Joe's Avatar

    I am a Ninja bitches!! Deal with it

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    Toronto
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    7,856

    Posted On:
    10/24/2008 3:43pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Improv comedy

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    My entire training is mostly "ah Hah" momements, followed by other "ah hah" moments.

    Learning to do one thing right only leads to more questions as I am still doing 10 things wrong.

    I am just starting to be at the point where I can break things down and start to identify issues.
  4. M.C. is offline
    M.C.'s Avatar

    This is all I do: girls, photography and BJJ...

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    Sao Paulo (BJJ Motherland!)
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    Posted On:
    10/24/2008 4:01pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: KeyboardHero/CameraJutsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    SamboSteve gave me a good aha with the triangle. I had a hard time finishing it, even though it was tight and I was 90 side ways (also one of the aha things). He told me to push the leg/ankle that is coming over your other ankle, outside. Thereby you bring your knees and legs closer and I can finish people way easier.
    Another aha was when I got taught how to rock when you are doing the scissor sweep, which makes it WAY easier. (I still have trouble with the step up though)

    PS: Nice tips, thank you for that. I still need the aha moment with my
    Sometimes you lose and sometimes the other guy wins.

    At this point I don't owe anybody an explenation.

    Schools I trained at:
    Lotus Club Cetepe Liberdade Sao Paulo
    Renzo Gracie NYC
    New York Combat Sambo
  5. 1point2 is offline
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    Senior Member

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    Posted On:
    10/24/2008 4:11pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: 剛 and 柔

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    These seem to be the "big little details" of technique--those minor but powerful changes that make a move go from muscle-based mediocrity to effective efficiency. Not the big-picture conceptual changes (move your hips, eliminate space, drop your weight...) that make for general help, but the technique-specific placement of grips,

    As for some of mine, wellllll...

    Getting under the opponent-- I learned tomoe-nage and made it work...somewhat. Then a wrestler, of all people, showed me how I wasn't getting deep enough under the opponent. I made that small tweak (sitting 6 inches closer to the opponent) and suddenly people were flying when in the past they had been barely tumbling.

    Then I made the same change to my butterfly sweep...and my ouchi-gari...and I realized that it was a generic change.

    A more specific one: juji-gatame. I was losing people's arms for six months, making it a 50% move, until I started touching myself. Err, umm...I mean, when I started grabbing my own gi, it became a 90% move. There, that sounds better.
  6. datdamnmachine is offline
    datdamnmachine's Avatar

    Jiu Jitsu - Sometimes passing just isn't an option.

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    Washington State
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    Posted On:
    10/24/2008 11:30pm

    supporting member
     Style: BJJ, Unauthorized Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by jasculs
    Have you ever been working on a technique over and over again but for some reason you just can't quite get it? Then your instructor walks up to you and says, "Do you have a question?" or "Is there something I can help you with in your technique". Then you explain that you've been working on a technique and you know it works because you've seen many people use it effectively but for some reason you just can't seem to get it right.

    After you show him what you've been doing. He grabs your training partner and then show's you the littlest and simplest detail you could have ever imagined but that "little" detail just made you go "Ah hah!!, Why didn't I think of that?". The simplest thing that he just showed you, now made your technique go from not being as effective to being extremely effective.

    This is a scenario that is very common and it's what I call "Invisible Grappling". It's the details and movements that take your techniques to the next level but for some reason they aren't very obvious. How about I give you some examples:

    Shoulder Walking - The movement where you move your shoulders backwards one shoulder at a time is what I call "shoulder walking". A very common scenario where you will see shoulder walking used effectively is when you are being stacked in your guard. When your opponent starts to stack you before he gets your legs over your face, quickly walk your shoulders backwards as you make your hips heavy. This will make it much harder for them to stack you because you are basically going in the same direction your opponent is taking you. You can also place your hands on your thighs and push on your legs as you shoulder walk backwards to increase the pressure against your opponent. Some scenarios where you can effectively use "shoulder walking" are:
    • When you are getting stacked when attempting an armbar from the guard.
    • When you are getting stacked when attempting a triangle choke from the guard.
    • You are getting stacked when your opponent attempts a double under the leg pass.
    Face Control - If your opponent can not move his/her face then they will not be able to move their body. If their head is stuck looking in a particular direction and they can't move it, you will have a lot of control over them. Let's give some examples.
    • Lets say you have your opponent in side control with your arm under their head and your shoulder pressuring into their face (Shoulder of Justice) forcing them to look away from you. When you do this, they lose the ability to turn their head. They will not be able to turn into you because they can't turn their face.
    • If you have the mount with your arm under their head while applying shoulder pressure forcing their head to turn to one direction preventing them from turning it, they will have a hard time bucking and turning to escape.
    • Next time you get the north south position place a lot of pressure down on your opponent's head with your body pinning it to look sideways and not only will it become very uncomfortable for them but they will have a much harder time escaping.
    Head Control - When you think of head control, what do you think of? You probably just think about grabbing your opponents head or neck and pulling it down so you can get control of it. What details do you think of to make it better? How can you increase the control of your opponent's head? First you don't want to grab your opponent's neck. That's not head control. That's "neck" control. When you control closer to your opponent's neck they will have more of an ability produce force against you and possibly still be able to posture up. The neck has a large amount of muscles in that area. The more muscles in the area you grab the more force your opponent can produce.

    So what do I want you to do? I want you to control right on the back of your opponent's head where there isn't hardly any muscle. When you control by this area you'll will make it much harder for them to posture up. Here are some examples of how you can use this concept effectively.
    • When you're in the clinch with your opponent from standing. Don't grab the back of their neck, grab the back of their head. Take notice the extra amount of leverage you will gain.
    • When you are going for an armbar on the bottom, take the leg that is across your opponent's neck and angle it out towards the back of your opponent's head while you place pressure down. Take notice of how it's much harder for you opponent to posture up and even try to stack you. To compare, you can also place your leg across the back of their neck so you can see how they can posture better and possibly also stack you. This is also one of the reason why you "should not" cross your ankles when going for an armbar from the guard. They isn't any head control.
    • When you work to establish head control of your opponent in an attempt to break your opponent's posture when their in your guard don't grab the back of their neck. Grab behind their head where there isn't much muscle. You'll pull their head down much easier.
    This are just a few concepts of "Invisible Grappling". As you gain more experience you may notice little details that you can use to improve upon what you already know. Always be aware that because you "think" you know something well it doesn't necessarily mean that you can't make it better. There's a reason why you hear others say that it's usually the "little details" that make the biggest difference.

    Thank you and great training to you,
    Jason

    www.GrapplersGuide.com
    Thanks man. Your very first example just gave me an Ah Hah Moment. Tomorrow's open mat. I'm going to print this out and take it with me to work on.
  7. jasculs is offline

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    314

    Posted On:
    10/24/2008 11:32pm


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by datdamnmachine
    Thanks man. Your very first example just gave me an Ah Hah Moment. Tomorrow's open mat. I'm going to print this out and take it with me to work on.
    You're very welcome
  8. Epicurus is offline

    I'm grindin' 'till I'm tired...

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,492

    Posted On:
    10/24/2008 11:32pm


     Style: Judo. Some BJJ/Kickboxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    A recent one was when learning Seoi Nage (shoulder throw, the one you always see in movies and the old Batman cartoon) in judo class, and I'm just basically lifting my partner by their shoulder every time instead of getting a nice smooth throw where I don't need to put in much strength to get a solid throw. So the coach comes over, I show him how I do it, he makes a correction, I do it again with the correction, better but still not working, then he shows me that I need to twist my feet slightly in the direction opposite the arm I'm attacking.

    I try it again and boom, night and day, the throw is sooooo much easier. Suddenly when I put in no strength I get the throw, and when I put in a lot of strength I get an awesome throw. Literally from complete **** to pretty okay in a split second.
    "[Fighting for Points] is doubtless very pretty, and invariably draws applause, but preferences should always be given to blows that do some business, to good straight hits that do something toward finishing the fight.
    A man who has carefully trained for brilliant tapping play, will find himself considerably out of it in case he is called upon to do any real work."
    -A.J. Newton, Boxing.
  9. Zapruder is offline
    Zapruder's Avatar

    Middleweight

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    Aug 2005
    Location
    San Marcos, Tx
    Posts
    2,354

    Posted On:
    10/26/2008 9:44pm

    supporting member
     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by gandp1120
    I did a private lesson with C. Machado, were we covered the butterfly sweeps. After ten mins. I had about 5 "AHHA" moments.
    How'd ya like the super hook?
  10. theotherserge is offline
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    Senior Member

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    North of San Francisco
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    Posted On:
    10/27/2008 4:11pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: sambo/crossfit

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    off the top of my head, the lapel grip@the back of the neck, "tag-grip": from a good grip for throws to ground work and chokes subs, it was very A-Ha for me.

    It works really nice in starting off on knees, it doesn't seem like a threatening grip but it can be excellent for a snap-down&pass cause you've got 'em by the nape of the neck.

    Also a recent coolness: if you get a single-leg pick and your opp. plants his leg back to the floor just release the leg&follow it and hit the double-leg takedown. Its fun!
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