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  1. #1

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    With the de la riva guard do you guys ever use it to take people's backs. Cause yea I learnt it a a week or two ago and was messing round with it. I nearly took a couple people's backs but not fully. But what I'm trying to say is it effective against skilled opponents when used to take people's backs?

  2. #2

    Join Date
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by bopinator
    With the de la riva guard do you guys ever use it to take people's backs. Cause yea I learnt it a a week or two ago and was messing round with it. I nearly took a couple people's backs but not fully. But what I'm trying to say is it effective against skilled opponents when used to take people's backs?
    Yes, this is one of the staple sweeps/transitions from DLR, at least it is for me. I have used it against blues and lower during live rolls and I have caught a few purples with it as well.

    With guys who are more skilled you have to set it up correctly and FULLY COMMIT to it once you decide to thread the wrapped leg to the guys far leg. Any delay or second thought will usually result in you defending a kneebar attempt or getting passed to side control.

  3. #3

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Damn BJJ and their ridiculous naming of every little variation of every position. Control his hips. Isolate. Off balance. Make or take space.

    There. That's basically what you need to know for guard, regardless of the naming, and where your legs are placed.

  4. #4
    WhiteShark's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Ryno
    Damn BJJ and their ridiculous naming of every little variation of every position. Control his hips. Isolate. Off balance. Make or take space.

    There. That's basically what you need to know for guard, regardless of the naming, and where your legs are placed.
    That's why BJJ > U
    You gotta have names for stuff if you want to repeat it, discuss it and perfect it.

  5. #5

    Join Date
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I recognize all of the positions that were shown in this thread. I've been in them. I know several attacks/sweeps/subs from most of them. But I don't know the Portuguese/BJJ name so this means I and my club suck? **** that.

    I think you need to talk to the local BJJ clubs to see what they think of Seattle Jujutsu/Seatown Sombo. It's funny but several of the local purples, browns, and blacks keep showing up to work out. Maybe it's just to help us with our technique naming.
    Last edited by Ryno; 6/11/2008 1:58pm at .

  6. #6

    Join Date
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    and **** the grasshopper guard.

    SBG calls that the sbg-spider guard.

    and yeah, if you don't have a name it's difficult to talk about it or eve to call it out. that's why i'm down to name every fucking sweep or movement and why i think eddie bravo is on the right path.

    even if we're going to end up like kung fu.

  7. #7

    Join Date
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Lol, nice one vinh.

    I understand the concept of naming for the sake of easy discussion. I mean it seems kind of odd that there's so little differentiation in Judo/JJJ's description of certain ground positions when they name every little fucking difference in a throw. I mean to describe a "kimura" I have to say "Ude Garame down". That is just goofy. But...

    I have never mastered a grappling technique or position just by talking about it. I need to see it, feel the balance and leverage points, the weight distribution, etc. Basically it's easier to learn any physical technique by being shown, and applying against a real person. And if this is true, is it completely impossible to learn a grappling position without knowing the name?

    Example: I use what looks like the De La Riva guard all of the time. I can at a glance see several possible sweeps and subs from there which I use regularly. I could clearly demonstrate these to someone, and they would be able to follow and learn them. So what does it matter what the name is besides a quick verbal frame of reference? Does it make me less of a grappler than a 2 month BJJ whitebelt, just because I didn't have a name for the De La Riva position and he does? Even though I could quickly demonstrate what the position was, plus several attacks from there?

    Now I'm not an uber-badass or anything, but I disagree with the concept that if you can reference something academically, it necessarily makes you better at the application of that concept. It aids in communication for sure. But it's still just a frame of reference which will still need to be described further by a hands-on application/demonstration if you really want to learn it.
    Last edited by Ryno; 6/11/2008 2:26pm at .

  8. #8

    Join Date
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Ryno
    Lol, nice one vinh.

    I understand the concept of naming for the sake of easy discussion. I mean it seems kind of odd that there's so little differentiation in Judo/JJJ's description of certain ground positions when they name every little fucking difference in a throw. I mean to describe a "kimura" I have to say "Ude Garame down". That is just goofy. But...

    I have never mastered a grappling technique or position just by talking about it. I need to see it, feel the balance and leverage points, the weight distribution, etc. Basically it's easier to learn any physical technique by being shown, and applying against a real person. And if this is true, is it completely impossible to learn a grappling position without knowing the name?

    Example: I use what looks like the De La Riva guard all of the time. I can at a glance see several possible sweeps and subs from there which I use regularly. I could clearly demonstrate these to someone, and they would be able to follow and learn them. So what does it matter what the name is besides a quick verbal frame of reference? Does it make me less of a grappler than a 2 month BJJ whitebelt, just because I didn't have a name for the De La Riva position and he does? Even though I could quickly demonstrate what the position was, plus several attacks from there?

    Now I'm not an uber-badass or anything, but I disagree with the concept that if you can reference something academically, it necessarily makes you better at the application of that concept. It aids in communication for sure. But it's still just a frame of reference which will still need to be described further by a hands-on application/demonstration if you really want to learn it.
    think of it this way... there's multiple players who all know what they're doing when it comes to the game, but for whatever reason cannot immediately start rolling, when they talk about their games and what they like to do, it's very difficult for them to be able to dialogue if they don't have frame of reference.

    or think of someone trying to coach you in a match or just in general, if you don't know what a bridge is or a particular motion is, you can't follow their advice. i honestly feel like it's important to name things so we all know what we're talking about when we speak about things in particular.

    especially as bjj is such an internet phenomenon, where i can't immediatley show you what i'm talking about.

  9. #9
    Kintanon's Avatar
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    TKD, BJJ
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    It's also handy to have names so when you are coaching someone you don't have to yell out, "Do that thing for 3 weeks ago on thursday where you had your arm up kind of near his head and then spun around!!!" Cause y'know, that's not all that helpful.

  10. #10

    Join Date
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    white boy jiujitsu
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    “In the beginning, a punch is just a punch, a kick is just a kick. In the middle, a punch is not a punch, and a kick is not a kick. In the end, a punch is just a punch, a kick is just a kick.”
    – Bruce Lee

    When you start compartmentalizing every position, every technique, and every movement that you learn you lose the fluidity that is the very nature of jiujitsu.

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