222305 Bullies, 3498 online  
  • Register
Our Sponsors:

Results 1 to 10 of 14
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Sponsored Links Spacer Image
  1. Scrotumlock is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    PST
    Posts
    83

    Posted On:
    12/14/2003 1:11am


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Why do the shoulders seem to loose so much mass with age?

    In pretty much every "young vs old" set of pictures you see of guys who lift weights (or not), the shoulders (muscles that is) seem to get a lot smaller with age. You see some pics of guys in their 50's or 60's even with good arms, chest, legs, abs, (good as in comparable to young guys) but the shoulders always seem to be small compared to young guys.

    I assume it has to do with not being able to train them as hard, but what is it about them that makes it so? Is it the way the joint is put together so it wears out more so than others? Very few men seem to be able to keep their yard-wide shoulders when they get old, yet can still keep good muscle mass on their arms, legs, backs and chests. Why for?
  2. 9chambers

    Guest

    Posted On:
    12/14/2003 1:21am


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    my guess is that it's back problems
  3. The Wastrel is offline
    The Wastrel's Avatar

    Such as thou art, sometime was I.

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    9,620

    Posted On:
    12/14/2003 2:11am

    supporting member
     Style: Brazilian Jiujitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I've heard that rotators are pretty much fucked no matter who you are by the time you're that age.
    Normally, I'd say I was grappling, but I was taking down and mounting people, and JFS has kindly informed us that takedowns and being mounted are neither grappling nor anti grappling, so I'm not sure what the **** I was doing. Maybe schroedinger's sparring, where it's neither grappling nor anti-grappling until somoene observes it and collapses the waveform, and then I RNC a cat to death.----fatherdog
  4. MiloNYC is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    169

    Posted On:
    12/14/2003 9:38pm


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Well, don't quote me but since the shoulders have a higher concentration of androgen receptor sites the loss in mass could be tied to the drop off in testosterone levels with age. The shoulders are the first thing to gain mass when hormones levels surge as a teenager, it would not surprise me if they where the first to lose it when those levels drop. Just a guess.
  5. FingerorMoon? is offline

    The man they call FoM

    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    3,592

    Posted On:
    12/14/2003 10:30pm

    supporting member
     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I think Wastrel is closest to being right.

    Many of us on this board have stated that some common shoulder exercises are damaging to the external rotators. The shoulder muscles may get bigger but you are doing cumulative damage.
    As the person gets older, the damage becomes more apparent and they can no longer do those exercises. They stick mainly to the ones that can still be done without discomfort/pain.

    Ask a few older trainers if they can still do heavy behind the neck shoulder press/pull down. I know a few that can't.

    Of course I could be totally wrong...
    The Wastrel - So attractive he HAS to be a woman.
    - Pizdoff
  6. MiloNYC is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    169

    Posted On:
    12/14/2003 10:48pm


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Hmm, old school weightlifters did almost entirely overhead lifts and no bench press. Rotator cuff injuries were unheard of. Same thing with Olympic weightlifters- they do massively heavy overhead lifts and almost never have rotator problems. I think machines and bench press are more to blame for rotator injuries than overhead lifting.
  7. udo is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    483

    Posted On:
    12/14/2003 10:52pm


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    FoM?--which shoulder exercises?
  8. FingerorMoon? is offline

    The man they call FoM

    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    3,592

    Posted On:
    12/14/2003 11:46pm

    supporting member
     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Upright row.
    Shoulder press or lat pull down behind the neck.
    (those 3 are the worse)
    Side raise.
    Front raise.
    Bench press with a wide grip.
    The Wastrel - So attractive he HAS to be a woman.
    - Pizdoff
  9. 9chambers

    Guest

    Posted On:
    12/14/2003 11:57pm


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    What's wrong with rows? .. To me, rows seem to work the entire muscle group together, back, arm, shoulder, chest, .. this seems like a pretty safe exercise. Am I wrong about that? Prove it.
  10. FingerorMoon? is offline

    The man they call FoM

    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    3,592

    Posted On:
    12/15/2003 12:23am

    supporting member
     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Think about the position your shoulder is in during the movement.

    Do a search on google on 'rotator cuff' and add the words 'injuries', 'rehab', 'exercises', 'dangers' etc and see the info you come up with.

    The book 'The 7 minute rotator cuff solution' has variations of exercises to limit the danger of certain exercises, but for upright rows, it has a big picture with a large X through it and entire page telling you why its just not a good idea to do.

    The Brawn and Beyond Brawn books from Stuart McRobert also has info on why the exercises isn't a good idea. So do the forums on www.hardgainer.com (MrRoberts website). Do a search there and have a look.
    The Wastrel - So attractive he HAS to be a woman.
    - Pizdoff
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Powered by vBulletin™© contact@vbulletin.com vBulletin Solutions, Inc. 2011 All rights reserved.