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  1. Ryno is offline

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    Posted On:
    9/02/2008 11:38am


     Style: FMA, Jujutsu/Judo/SAMBO

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    FMA- Largo angled attack, blind side

    As requested, here is another drill that we've been playing with, this one focusing on attacking and opponent's blind side. Once again, we are working on getting clear of our opponent's forward-facing guard, and getting our hits to wrap around his defense. In this variation we are maintaining long range, but this approach could be used as a setup to press to close range.

    Bob Park and Ryan Greene of LESKAS Seattle demonstrate.

    YouTube - Wrapping hits, blindside
  2. Matt Stone is offline
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    Posted On:
    9/03/2008 2:10am

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     Style: FMA, CMA, & more

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    What's your lead-in on this? I'd assume that the opponent won't be standing still, cooperating with your blind-side attack, so...

    ACTIVE

    I would think that a baiting #1, followed by the angled step and a follow-up #2/#4 strike would work nicely. Perhaps with a simultaneous advance into the opponent with the #2/#4, going from largo to corto.

    PASSIVE

    If the opponent delivered a right handed (I note this because Ryno had double sticks) #2/#4 strike, then the #2/#4 parry with the angled step would get you into position just fine.

    I tend to be a little on the passive side mostly. My Yiliquan training is very much defensive/responsive, waiting for the opponent to commit to something in order to eliminate his ability to redirect/react to my response. When I'm facing multiples, I'm inclined to go on the offensive (as we say in class "...then go after the witnesses").

    So, do you play this with the attacker attacking, or taking the fight to him?
  3. pyromaniac1918 is offline
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    Posted On:
    9/03/2008 5:03am


     Style: Arnis, BJJ, Judo (noob)

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    What syle FMA do you do?
  4. Matt Stone is offline
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    Posted On:
    9/03/2008 8:07am

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     Style: FMA, CMA, & more

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by pyromaniac1918
    What syle FMA do you do?
    Who are you asking?

    Ryno does LESKAS (his website is http://leskas.com/WordPress/).

    I do NSI under Kelly Worden, and have studied both Modern Arnis and Pekiti Tirsia in the past.
  5. selfcritical is offline

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    Posted On:
    9/03/2008 8:30am


     Style: Pekiti, ARMA, other stuff

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Since this is a hand range target, I would assume he'd draw a response on the forehand horizontal line to open.
  6. pyromaniac1918 is offline
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    Posted On:
    9/03/2008 8:34am


     Style: Arnis, BJJ, Judo (noob)

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Stone
    Who are you asking?

    Ryno does LESKAS (his website is http://leskas.com/WordPress/).

    I do NSI under Kelly Worden, and have studied both Modern Arnis and Pekiti Tirsia in the past.
    Was asking Ryno but you answer my qeustion.

    Is there a thread about NSI and LESKAS because both of those styles i've never heard of.
  7. Matt Stone is offline
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    Posted On:
    9/03/2008 9:44am

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     Style: FMA, CMA, & more

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by pyromaniac1918
    Was asking Ryno but you answer my qeustion.

    Is there a thread about NSI and LESKAS because both of those styles i've never heard of.
    Ryno's website has quite a bit of information LESKAS's history.

    NSI stands for Natural Spirit International, and is run by Kelly Worden. He was the first American named "datu" by Prof. Presas in Modern Arnis. His website is www.kellyworden.com.
  8. Ryno is offline

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    Posted On:
    9/03/2008 12:21pm


     Style: FMA, Jujutsu/Judo/SAMBO

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    LESKAS is an acronym for Lema Scientific Kali Arnis System. We are Lightning Scientific Arnis as taught under the late GM Elmer Ybanez. More info on our website.

    As far as the drill goes, the second stick held near my head is just a target so that I don't get my skull bashed in. (Think focus mitts) It's probably smarter to wear a helmet too, as it's difficult to defend against an attack from this angle even when pressing a beefy stick to my shoulder and leaning my head away. I still almost get clocked.

    We sometimes do drills like this, in a fairly passive way so that people can work out the footwork and not get confused by the dynamic pressure of a more live drill. What we show here is a fairly simple setup with a horizontal forehand slap, step to the side, then backhand to the side of his head.

    A more live application will rely on baiting your opponent more, as you guys are asking about. A simple forehand/backhand is unlikely to get through most times even with good angling and footwork, and your opponent is likely to square up to you before you can get around to his blind side.

    As this is an angled attack/counter, probably the most important thing to get your opponent to do is to get him thinking and working linearly, or to turn to expose his blindside more. Collapsing the range from extreme largo to more of a medio/largo will also help, and will make for a lot less ground that you have to cover with your feet as you angle to the side.

    So with this in mind with a purely offensive mindset, I might try this: Step to my right, his left just a little, target his lead hand with a short 1/vertical forehand. Retract to open/forehand position (circular retraction). Repeat, stepping again to my right again. He should start turning to his left.

    By moving as I hit I minimize the chance that he gets a bead on my head as I'm throwing. As I throw these vertical number ones, my head is not locked in place where he'll zero in on it. I'll step, throw my hit, and my head will lean to the side so that my stick is out front and I'm hiding behind my hit. So even if he is throwing while I'm throwing, and even if his hands are faster than mine, my head will not be where he expects it to be without anticipating my direction.

    (pardon the over-analysis, and technical minutae, but this is stuff we're having our guys work on a lot lately)

    So, I've moved twice slightly to my right, picking at him with hand shots but not getting in so drastically deep that I've got to worry about his rear hand, kicks, or a shoot for takedown. Now if he's worth his salt, what is he going to thing next? He'll anticipate my movement, and turn even farther to his left so that he can track/anticipate where my head and hands will be. (The vertical retraction to a #1 position tends to clear your hands out of danger very quickly.)

    This is where we pick up with what the drill demonstrates. We now shoot a short and flat number one/horizontal forehand, but I don't move to the right. He sees forehand again, and is teeing up turning to his left. I now step in and to my left/his right, angling out hard.

    Ideally, I slap his hand or arm as he guards or begins a throw that I am ducking behind/outside of. (If I can't duck it, I can shield up by redirecting my forehand strike to a forehand shield block.) I need to keep this slap short to immediately tee up a horizontal backhand which I should land right behind his ear. I prefer a horizontal or slight upward backhand when attacking the blindside, as the hit hides behind his shoulder until the last second, and is very difficult to defend. Follow up with another shot from largo as I move away, or press and flurry.

    Defensively, if I can bait him into a linear attack, I can sometime just slap him, angle out, and land the hit.

    These certainly aren't the only options as far as setups go. Anything that gets him turning to expose his back, or pressing linearly can work quite well.
    Last edited by Ryno; 9/03/2008 12:25pm at .

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