233678 Bullies, 3387 online  
  • Register
Our Sponsors:

Results 1 to 8 of 8
Sponsored Links Spacer Image
  1. nocs7666 is offline

    Featherweight

    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    17

    Posted On:
    8/25/2008 7:22am

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Qwan Ki Do, Kickboxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Rope jumping

    I've just done a research typing "jump rope" and I haven't found anything strictly related.

    I've just read this thread Amature boxing 101 PDF. - No BS Martial Arts

    Reading the pdf you can find this line: «Always jump on a padded surface. Jumping on concrete is too easy and bad for your legs» (page 5 of the pdf file)

    Is this true? I usually jump on mat and sometimes on the concrete... but since the mat is very hard I just don't feel any relevant difference.

    I usually do 3 round of 3 minutes each and sometimes my knees are quite "tired" (I mean: close to feel a slight pain but not actually feeling any pain). But I've never blamed the rope-jumping, since I train 4-5 times a week and there could be several reasons for my feelings.

    Any hints?
  2. syberia is offline
    syberia's Avatar

    Here to kick your ass.

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    3,773

    Posted On:
    8/25/2008 8:25am

    supporting member
     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by nocs7666
    I've just done a research typing "jump rope" and I haven't found anything strictly related.

    I've just read this thread http://www.bullshido.net/forums/showthread.php?t=30311

    Reading the pdf you can find this line: «Always jump on a padded surface. Jumping on concrete is too easy and bad for your legs» (page 5 of the pdf file)

    Is this true? I usually jump on mat and sometimes on the concrete... but since the mat is very hard I just don't feel any relevant difference.

    I usually do 3 round of 3 minutes each and sometimes my knees are quite "tired" (I mean: close to feel a slight pain but not actually feeling any pain). But I've never blamed the rope-jumping, since I train 4-5 times a week and there could be several reasons for my feelings.

    Any hints?
    You probably wont do any injuries, but mats generally chushion the fall a bit more, taking a fair bit of the shock from being absorbed by the knees. Even if the mat seems hard, it does make a difference to concrete. If you can jump on a mat i would suggest it, just to save your knees the strain.

    If you land right you shouln't have issues either way though, as you seem to have fine knees.


    Chaos? Panic?... Disorder??
    .........................​My work here is done.

  3. Vorpal is offline
    Vorpal's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    A Hell of my own making
    Posts
    3,077

    Posted On:
    8/25/2008 9:32am

    Join us... or die
     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    If you are wearing good footwear (I like PF flyers for jumping rope, most running shoes are too thin up front) it shouldn't be an issue. Look into getting a heavyrope to add some variety to your jumprope workout.
  4. Yohan is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Huntsville, AL
    Posts
    576

    Posted On:
    8/25/2008 9:38am


     Style: JKD

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Jumping on concrete won't NECESSARILY give you arthritic knees, but why take the risk?? I personally will jump on anything softer than concrete - hardwood floors, hard gym mats, fine, but I don't generally jump on concrete - plus, it tears your jump rope up.
  5. Vorpal is offline
    Vorpal's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    A Hell of my own making
    Posts
    3,077

    Posted On:
    8/25/2008 9:42am

    Join us... or die
     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    It will tear up your rope. Get the old fashioned beaded kind.
  6. Teh El Macho is offline
    Teh El Macho's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Porcupine/Hollywood, FL & Parmistan via Elbonia
    Posts
    11,762

    Posted On:
    8/25/2008 11:14am

    supporting member
     Style: creonte on hiatus

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by nocs7666
    I've just done a research typing "jump rope" and I haven't found anything strictly related.

    I've just read this thread http://www.bullshido.net/forums/showthread.php?t=30311

    Reading the pdf you can find this line: «Always jump on a padded surface. Jumping on concrete is too easy and bad for your legs» (page 5 of the pdf file)

    Is this true? I usually jump on mat and sometimes on the concrete... but since the mat is very hard I just don't feel any relevant difference.

    I usually do 3 round of 3 minutes each and sometimes my knees are quite "tired" (I mean: close to feel a slight pain but not actually feeling any pain). But I've never blamed the rope-jumping, since I train 4-5 times a week and there could be several reasons for my feelings.

    Any hints?
    If you go on by "feeling" alone, you will eventually **** yourself up.

    Or actually, let me rephrase that: if you go by "not feeling it" alone, you will eventually **** yourself up. Hmmmm, yeah, that sentence is kinda confusing in a very fucked up way, so let me explain.

    When you train, you feel how your body reacts. When your body lets you feel something such as a burn, a twist, a sandy, grinding feeling in the joints, a crank (specially on the spine), numbness, concentrated, highly localized pain, or any sensation that clues you something is not right, that's a sign something is on its way to get fucked up.

    So "feeling" here helps you. "Feeling", the actual positive signal of feeling something fucked up is usually right.

    But "not feeling", not having a sensation, that doesn't mean ****. Injuries do not occur overnight, and sometimes you don't get red flags nor signs of pain until it blows up and your a facing a medical bill.

    So don't fool yourself into thinking there isn't any relevant difference. No matter how hard a mat is, a mat is a mat, and concrete is concrete. If your knees are feeling funny now, imagine what it would be if you were doing it on concrete.

    BTW, my preferred way of skipping is by laying three 2x2 half-inch thick rubber puzzle mats (making a 2x6 jumping area) on concrete and wearing water shoes or chuck taylors). Jumping on grass cut very short is also a good way to do it. It can get some time to get used to and "get it right" since the rope tends to slow down unpredictably when it hits the grass. Jumping on dirt or sand is also good.


    Now, regarding frequency, maybe frequent skipping combined with 4-5 times of training a week are taking a toll on your knees. We really can't tell. Some people can do that **** and more w/o feeling a thing. Others can't.

    To be honest, the best thing you can do is stop skipping for 2-3 weeks and notice if you feel any difference. Then gradually introduce your skipping, and stay at a frequency that works well with the rest of your training schedule.

    Also, ice your knees always, always, always. Any joint that hurts, shoulder, knee, back, neck, whatever, ice the living **** out of it, after training whenever possible, and within 24 hours of getting an injury. Always.

    Make it a habit, a necessity, like pooping, and you will see a big improvement in how you feel and how you perform during training.
    Read this for flexibility and injury prevention, this, this and this for supplementation, this on grip conditioning, and this on staph. New: On strenght standards, relationships and structural balance. Shoulder problems? Read this.

    My crapuous vlog and my blog of training, stuff and crap. NEW: Me, Mrs. Macho and our newborn baby.

    New To Weight Training? Get the StrongLifts 5x5 program and Rippetoe's "Starting Strength, 2nd Ed". Wanna build muscle/gain weight? Check this article. My review on Tactical Nutrition here.

    t-nation - Dissecting the deadlift. Anatomy and Muscle Balancing Videos.

    The street argument is retarded. BJJ is so much overkill for the street that its ridiculous. Unless you're the idiot that picks a fight with the high school wrestling team, barring knife or gun play, the opponent shouldn't make it past double leg + ground and pound - Osiris
  7. nocs7666 is offline

    Featherweight

    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    17

    Posted On:
    8/25/2008 1:15pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Qwan Ki Do, Kickboxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    that's very clear! thanx
  8. muddy is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    164

    Posted On:
    8/25/2008 2:45pm


     Style: boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by nocs7666
    I've just done a research typing "jump rope" and I haven't found anything strictly related.

    I've just read this thread http://www.bullshido.net/forums/showthread.php?t=30311

    Reading the pdf you can find this line: «Always jump on a padded surface. Jumping on concrete is too easy and bad for your legs» (page 5 of the pdf file)

    Is this true? I usually jump on mat and sometimes on the concrete... but since the mat is very hard I just don't feel any relevant difference.

    I usually do 3 round of 3 minutes each and sometimes my knees are quite "tired" (I mean: close to feel a slight pain but not actually feeling any pain). But I've never blamed the rope-jumping, since I train 4-5 times a week and there could be several reasons for my feelings.

    Any hints?
    I know a lot of work has been done trying to correlate injury rates to types of surfaces for runners, and I dont believe anyone has concretely established that the type of surface makes any difference at all. I think there is even one study out there that suggests there is less peak shock running on harder surfaces. I doubt that rope jumping has been seriously studied in that regard.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Powered by vBulletin™© contact@vbulletin.com vBulletin Solutions, Inc. 2011 All rights reserved.