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  1. Nemesai is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/15/2008 1:57pm


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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I took Usana Healthpack 100 AM/PM packets for a year or so. If they weren't so expensive I'd be taking them still. 120ish a month.

    Based on the, "Comparative Guide to Nutritional Supplements" by Lyle MacWilliam, it's by far the best, based on content and absorbability.

    Centrum Performance: 5.2% rating
    GNC Ultra Mega Green 46.9%
    Kirkland Signature (Costco) Daily Multivitamin 5.2%
    USANA Health Sciences Essentials 96.1%
    Watkins Superfood Multiple 27.2%

    *Each product is graphically compared to the selected reference standard, based on the relative product scores.*

    I felt like a million bucks while taking USANA healthpack am/pm, I'll continue one day if I'm rich. *not likely*
  2. TheRuss is offline
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    Posted On:
    8/15/2008 3:15pm

    Join us... or die
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Nemesai
    Based on the, "Comparative Guide to Nutritional Supplements" by Lyle MacWilliam, it's by far the best, based on content and absorbability.
    Could you explain this assessment?
  3. Nemesai is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/15/2008 4:04pm


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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by TheRuss
    Could you explain this assessment?
    Here's the blended standard:


    This is based on a summation of these peoples' work:
    1. <LI class=style19>Phyllis Balch, CNC, is a leading nutritional counselor in America and a recognized advocate of nutritional therapies. She is author of Prescription for Nutritional Healing: The A-to-Z Guide to Supplements (2002). <LI class=style19>
    2. Dr. Michael Colgan, Ph.D., is an internationally recognized authority on sports nutrition and author of The New Nutrition: Medicine for the Millennium (1995) and Hormonal Health: Nutritional and Hormonal Strategies for Emotional Well-Being and Intellectual Longevity (1996). <LI class=style19>
    3. Dr. Earl Mindell, Ph.D., is one of America's leading nutritionists and an internationally recognized authority on nutrition, drugs, vitamins and herbal remedies. Dr. Mindell has authored several books, including Earl Mindell's Vitamin Bible for the 21st Century (1999) and Dr. Earl Mindell's What You Should Know About Creating Your Own Personal Health Plan (1996). <LI class=style19>
    4. Dr. Michael Murray, N.D., is one of the world's leading authorities on natural medicine. Dr. Murray has published over 20 books on natural medicine, including the Encyclopedia of Nutritional Supplements (1996) and the Encyclopedia of Natural Medicine (1998). <LI class=style19>
    5. Dr. Richard Passwater, Ph.D., is an acknowledged expert in free radical pathology and trace element research. A biochemist renowned for his contributions to the advancement of science, Dr. Passwater is also the author of best-selling guide, The New Supernutrition (1991) and The Antioxidants (1997). <LI class=style19>
    6. Dr. Ray Strand, M.D., has been a practicing family physician for 26 years. Dr. Strand is the author of Bionutrition: Winning the War Within (1998) and What Your Doctor Doesn't Know About Nutritional Medicine May Be Killing You (2002).
    7. Dr. Julian Whitaker, M.D., is author of the best selling guide, Dr. Whitaker's Guide to Natural Healing (1996), he is also the author and publisher of Health & Healing a leading health newsletter in the U.S., with a circulation of nearly 700,000.

    Where at least three of the authors recommend everyone supplement their diet with a particular nutrient, the median value of the recommendations is chosen for inclusion in the Blended Standard.



    Then some **** I can't copy and paste, these are the other criteria for testing:

    1 Completeness - does it contain the full spectrum etc..

    2 Potency - of the nutrients present, what % are fount at potency levels meeting or exceeding 50%

    3 Bioavailability - does the product contain minierals in their most
    bioavailable forms as amino acid chelates or organic acid complexes?

    4 Bioactivity of Vitamin E - Does the product contain only the d-isomer of vitamin E (natural form as opposed to synthetic)

    5 Cardiac Health Triad - does the product contain vitamin e, coenzyme Q10 and magnesium, 3 nutritional components important to cardiac health

    6 Homocysteine Reduction Triad - Does the product contain the nutritional triad of vitamin B6, B12, Folic acid, at levels 50% or better than the standard

    7 Bone health complex - does the product contain the nutrients shown by clinical studies to be important for optimal bone health

    8 Antioxidant Triad - does the product contain the important antioxidant triad of vitamin E, Vitamin C and Beta-carotene at levels etc

    9 Glutahione Support - does the product contain the nutritional precursors necessary for glutathione synthesis and the proper functioning of the Glutathione Peroxidaxe Pathway, at potentencies etc

    10 Metabolic Support - does the product contain the nutrients necessary to help regulate glucose metabolism and support the body's ability to generate, store and utilize energy, and are these nutrients available at potencies etc

    11 Bioflavonoid Profile - Does the product contain a mixture of bioflavonoids (citrus flavonoids, soy isoflavones, quercetin, quercitrin, hesperidin, rutin, bilberry extract and gree tea catechins) and proanthocyanidins at potencies that meet or exceed etc

    12 Phenolic Compound Profile - Does the product contain phenolic compounds at a potency etc, that has been associated with a reduces incidence of coronary heart disease

    13 Lipotropic Factors - Does the product contain the important lipotropic factors, choline and inositol, at levels etc

    14 Potential Toxicities - Does the nutritional supplement contain levels of Vitamin A and iron that exceed 100% of the standard?



    I just typed that off the book. And I dont know much about what it means.


    There were some pretty neat demonstrations with the Usana brand back when I was buying, they had an apple cut in half, put one face down in a peatry dish of distilled water with a centrum tablet, and another in the same with a usana pill. A week later the centrum apple was all moldy and brown, the Usana apple looked white and fresh. But that all aside, I really felt fantastic, almost like it lifted my mood with some sort of happy drug.
  4. TheRuss is offline
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    Posted On:
    8/15/2008 4:28pm

    Join us... or die
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Here's the thing. USANA is a multi-level marketing company. As such, their sales are dependent on getting normal people to persuade their friends to purchase them. Also, as far as I know, Lyle MacWilliam's book has not been peer-reviewed - and at least one of the experts listed (Ray Strand) is listed on USANA's Scientific Advisory Council.

    In other words... the people who are telling you this stuff are probably trying to sell you something. Some of their claims of better performance may be valid, but remember, we're talking about multivitamins, not supplements in general.
  5. Nemesai is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/15/2008 4:38pm


     Style: Boxing

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by TheRuss
    Here's the thing. USANA is a multi-level marketing company. As such, their sales are dependent on getting normal people to persuade their friends to purchase them. Also, as far as I know, Lyle MacWilliam's book has not been peer-reviewed - and at least one of the experts listed (Ray Strand) is listed on USANA's Scientific Advisory Council.

    In other words... the people who are telling you this stuff are probably trying to sell you something. Some of their claims of better performance may be valid, but remember, we're talking about multivitamins, not supplements in general.

    They definitely were trying to push people in to a pyramid type sales group. I just took the pills. I also tried their 5 day fiber clense, meal replacement program, which was a nice way to get off a bad diet and find new pleasure in simplest of foods again. Sort of made an apple as much a sought after food as a double meat bacon burger by the end of day 5.

    It's been atleast 3 years since I've taken anything, but I plan to get back on them at some point, or maybe some cheaper, almost as good product.
  6. jdinca is offline
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    Posted On:
    8/17/2008 6:28pm


     Style: Chinese Kenpo

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I've been using Ola Loa for a few years now. Seems to be decent stuff. Contains a number of minerals and amino acids in addition to vitamins.
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