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  1. blisterstarr is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/01/2008 3:23pm


     Style: Catch as Catch Can

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    By the way, I studied under a boxing coach for a day and he said that same dumb ass quote.
  2. Anna Kovacs is offline
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    Posted On:
    8/01/2008 3:45pm

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     Style: Dancing the Spears

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by blisterstarr
    Actually you should take it up with the state athletic commissions and USA boxing because as far as combat sports go the difference between a pro and an amateur is simply whether they're doing it for free, or whether they are doing it for money. If you have 100 amateur fights. You're an amateur fighter.

    If you get paid 50 bucks the first time you crawl in the ring, you're a professional. In many states amateur MMA is completely illegal so every fighter go's "pro" on their first fight.

    This is stupid. In other countries they use a letter ranking system that's based on number of fights so you don't have "pro" and "amateur" as a matchmaking criteria. Number of total fights is the only criteria that they use. Smart system...anyways.






    True, but if your fighting with rules and regulations it is a game.
    Technically it is a game but when you're trying to break someones face it doesn't feel much like a game. I can't speak for anyone else but when I get in the ring it's fight or flight. It comes from the same place that you'd be coming from in an actual self defense situation because you are in a self defense situation. Only your opponent is more likely a trained conditioned athlete and not some guy who had to much to drink.


    someone needs to tell that to these guys, because they dont have a fucking clue.
    I can assure you that I've seen "professional" fighters that look just as bad.
  3. Khun Kao is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/01/2008 5:30pm


     Style: MuayThai

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    blisterstarr....

    The bottom line is that I could care less what Webster says the definition of "amateur" is. As Annatrocity succintly pointed out, what matters in combat sports is what your State Athletic/Boxing/Wrestling Commissions say.

    I also don't care what you think of my boxing coaches quote. Try and pick it apart as much as you like (Bowling? Puh-lease), but the underlying point remains and is 100% true.....

    FIGHTING IS NOT A GAME!

    Combat Sports (Boxing, Kickboxing, and MMA) are unlike other sports. In Combat Sports, the ultimate goal is to win by making your opponent physically unable to continue. This magnifies the risk involved. While no sport is completely without risk (Example: Tiger Woods golf injuries), the potential for serious injury in combat sports is greater, which brings me back to the point I've been trying to make....

    You cannot apply "amateur" standards of other sports to combat sports. Whether you are getting paid or not, you need to train train like a pro. Your opponent does not care if you're a "serious" fighter or a weekend warrior who is just competing for the "fun" of it. If you cannot commit to a proper training regimen, you should not fight.

    I'm not trying to be an ass, but I have been involved in almost every conceivable level of combat sports. Fan, Fighter, Coach, Official, Promoter.... I've done it all. I am speaking from the standpoint of someone who has had to take one of their "amateur" fighters (not-so-serious students who only trained about 2x's a week) to the hospital when he was horribly injured in the ring because he had not committed to the proper training regimen.

    For the record, the injury was horrible enough that he was unable to take up training again, and still has lingering issues to cope with due to the injury years later.

    It probably won't be the last time I have to take a fighter to the hospital, but in the future it will never again be because my fighter did not take his training seriously.
  4. WhiteShark is offline
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    1% Shark is better than you.

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    Posted On:
    8/01/2008 11:40pm

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     Style: BJJ/Shidokan

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Frankly, if you fought on an amateur card in a big city with your training levels you would have been seriously injured if you fought a competent striker.

    Where were these kids when I was fighting Muay Thai regularly?
  5. murderethic is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/02/2008 12:07am


     

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by WhiteShark
    Frankly, if you fought on an amateur card in a big city with your training levels you would have been seriously injured if you fought a competent striker.
    Quite possibly. Of course if I went up against a competent striker he probably would have dropped me within first few flurries. Broken jaw, broken nose, punch decapitation... all possible I suppose.

    Regardless, I take issue with "would have" predictions. "Would have" doesn't directly relate to what happened.

    Granted: If I fight someone that trains all day every day then I have a higher probability of losing. That makes sense.

    To become a stronger competitor I need to train more often, and "smarter". Agreed.
    No gym or training partners in my area currently meets my schedule requirements. Without a major career overhaul I will not be able to train like a pro or even as often as I like. I'm definitely trying to find a way to make that happen. If you find the magic career that pays me to train lemme know. Until then I will make the most of what I can do, and yes, I may very well make the risky decision to fight again without meeting everyone elses criteria for "ready"

    What I would like is more emphasis on things I can correct and avoid from the fight itself, through specific training and technique, and less speculation about how quickly I would be killed if I faced an actual opponent at a certain skill level.

    Please?
  6. Torakaka is offline
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    Do you eat breakfast?

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    Posted On:
    8/02/2008 1:04am

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     Style: Kitty Pow Pow!!!

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Technical critique is almost entirely meaningless for you given your current training situation. I'm going to leave this thread open for now in case people have some more good stuff to post, but you really need to stay out of this section until you can come back and say you've started seriously training.

    I really do implore you not to step in the ring again until you've been able to get some real fight training, not just for your own safety (which can't be stressed enough of course) but because you're 1. not really going to get much out of the experience of just going in and getting beat up and then continuing to not train properly and 2. while tomato cans are just a part of combat sports, they just make it look bad and really bring down the quality of the sport itself.

    Also, if/when you do intend on fighting again I would recommend getting yourself an amateur boxing match. Amateur boxing is a bit safer/less injurious then MMA and especially muay thai/kickboxing since it's generally (at least at USA boxing sanctioned tournaments and such) very closely regulated and if you're just getting beat up the ref will end things pretty quickly. Also you'll be in a better situation to try and apply the technique you've learned in a fight, whereas an MMA fight is more prone to the ugliness we see here (not that boxing matches don't get ugly, but since it's a strict rule set, technique is a bit more enforced).

    Oh yeah and grappling competitions obviously (you... do grapple right? I hope so at least since you fought MMA)
  7. Nemesai is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/05/2008 4:12am


     Style: Boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Like a few said, it takes a lot of courage to get in there, but it's not something to be foolhardy about.

    A match is something you should be overly prepared for. I quit my job and don't do anything but focus on a match when the time comes, for those couple months, I'm only a fighter. It's weird though, because during that time, things like diet and training become not an obstacle, but a necessity. You'll happily eat your little portion of wheat pasta, and instead of thinking, "damn we're going to work and spar til the break tonight" you think, "I better not drag ass on this run, and I hope we spar to the break after"

    You shouldn't fight unless you've got a gym and trainer to keeps you in the right. One thing I always remember when training and pre-fight.. in some sort of words: Now is when we suffer, so that we do not suffer later. When it's a few minutes before a fight, the words change to, "I've done my suffering, now it's the fun part" or, "Now they suffer"

    And really when it comes down to it, the fights are the shortest and easiest parts of the whole ordeal. You may have to walk through some fire, but if you've bathed in it until that moment, it'll be just another sparring session. I would be shitting myself if I hadn't given my soul in training, a feeling I've had after a week of BlackJack/drinking in Vegas before one of my Am matches, I'll never allow myself to feel that way again.

    But I'm also the kind of person that feels like I'm out of shape if I miss 2 days of practice.

    All that said, you did remarkable considering the circumstances.


    edit: another thing, you never want to fight heavier than you need. You did well to get down that 50, but you should be a lean mean machine by the time you fight. If you're 6foot, you need to be fighting around 160+/- 20 pounds. But you have to be sparring to adjust/cope with the speed of lighter guys.
    Last edited by Nemesai; 8/05/2008 4:17am at .
  8. blisterstarr is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/08/2008 3:41pm


     Style: Catch as Catch Can

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by WhiteShark
    Frankly, if you fought on an amateur card in a big city with your training levels you would have been seriously injured if you fought a competent striker.

    Where were these kids when I was fighting Muay Thai regularly?
    In KY there are small league amateur MMA and big league amateur MMA
  9. blisterstarr is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/08/2008 3:44pm


     Style: Catch as Catch Can

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    by the way I found Murderethic's training video for those of you interested.

    YouTube - Turkish Star Wars Training Montage
  10. Scrapper is offline
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    Posted On:
    8/08/2008 3:57pm

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     Style: MMA

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    OK.

    Scrapper is almost always a "voice of reason" kind of poster, but I swear to god, if one more douchebag without an "amateur fighter" or "Pro fighter" tag posts in this thread about how the OP "Wasn't ready" or that he should have used this technique or that technique, I am gonna start issuing e-challenges.

    Strapping on the gloves and walking into the cage/ring in front of god knows how many people to fight someone you have never seen before is one of the loneliest, scariest things in the world. The first time you do it, you are lucky if you can even remember your own name, let alone a game plan.

    Technique? Yeah right. That's the first thing to go. Strategy follow right after. If you are lucky, you are physically fit enough to ride it out and get the win, but usually your opponent is in as good of shape as are.

    A real fight in a real venue in front of real people is MORE stressful than a street fight. Only experience will make it easier.

    To the OP:

    Good work. You looked spooked out there, but that is understandable. It sounds like you already know what you need to do to improve, and Anna can cover any of your other questions. Experience will make it easier.



    EDIT: Just read the part where he's not seriously training. That is stupid. Train for real and try it again.
    Last edited by Scrapper; 8/08/2008 3:59pm at . Reason: more context.
    And lo, Kano looked down upon the field and saw the multitudes. Amongst them were the disciples of Uesheba who were greatly vexed at his sayings. And Kano spake: "Do not be concerned with the mote in thy neighbor's eye, when verily thou hast a massive stick in thine ass".

    --Scrolls of Bujutsu: Chapter 5 vs 10-14.
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