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Thread: Advice please

  1. #41
    jdinca's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by pauli
    bjj addresses what to do before being grabbed: pick up the kids and run.
    It's a stupid style that doesn't recommend that as a first line of defense. It's certainly not unique to BJJ.

  2. #42

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I have to join the choir in telling you not to listen to seriousmantid. Even with the best stand-up training in the world, there's a very good chance you'll get taken down. So you need to learn to grapple on the ground. But you should do striking too, cuz that's important (provided you can afford this AND grappling).

    And enroll your family. There's going to be plenty of time in the future, and possibly the present, when they're on their own walking around in the city or burb or whatever. If something bad happens then, none of your skills will be worth much.

  3. #43

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Just a thought, everybody seems to be recommending BJJ or some sort of grappling arts, which is fine but it strikes me that we are all assuming that the person has access to a quality school. I think sometimes the important thing is a really good and experienced instructor with a real world perspective?
    That person may well be teaching a bjj style, or not?

  4. #44
    slideyfoot's Avatar
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    Artemis BJJ | Brazilian Jiu Jitsu in Bristol
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    Welcome to Bullshido!

    Quote Originally Posted by zone5girl
    Please don't laugh too hard...I'm a stay-at-home-mom and I would love to get involved in martial arts. [...] What form would be best for someone of fairly small stature trying to overpower someone probably much stronger? Any schools you'd recommend in the Cleveland area?
    BJJ is an excellent choice for women. In terms of self-defence, BJJ is perfect from a female perspective, as it deals with the unfortunately common self-defence situation of rape: BJJ features a lot of attacks and defences when someone is in between your legs. It is also a martial art which was designed for a smaller person to overcome a larger one, which again has clear applications for women's self-defence.

    In terms of sport, itís a great work-out (see the Fightworks Podcast for a good discussion), and far more interesting than running on a treadmill at the gym. Fitness is one of my big reasons for training in BJJ, as I found the gym a little dull. BJJ keeps me interested, because itís a complex sport: there's always something new to learn.

    My most regular training partners are women, and when it comes to free sparring, if there's a woman on the mat, she'll be the person I pick to roll with. That also goes for drilling: there's one woman in particular, Christina (you'll see her mentioned frequently on my blog) who is an awesome training partner, so I make sure to seek her out when she's in class (which is normally pretty often). I'm fortunate in that the Roger Gracie Academy has a decent number of women, so I normally get to roll with at least one each class, sometimes as many as three or four.

    It is true that comparatively speaking, there aren't many women in the sport at present, so its likely you will have to spar with men. However, I don't think thatís a cause for concern: in my experience, the women at RGA have no trouble training with the men, particularly when the man in question is a small guy like myself.

    If you're training for self-defence, then it also makes sense to train with somebody whose bodytype is more likely to match your typical attacker: a large male. That option is open to you in a BJJ class, where training partners tend to be helpful and happy to give out advice.

    I would love to see more women in the sport, so I hope you'll decide to check it out. There are even women only classes available in some places, like kimonogirl in Toronto, though as I said, I don't think you should have a problem training in a mixed club.

    If you need some inspiration, Christina has a great blog. You could also read what some other women BJJers have written: take a look at these blogs by Indra, Jem, Felicia and Val.

    You could also listen to this episode of the Fightworks Podcast, all about women. Then there's this interview with the aforementioned Felicia Oh.

    To finish, here's a vid of some of the women at kimonogirl talking about what BJJ means to them:

    YouTube - Kimonoworld: Women Talk about BJJ

  5. #45
    It is Fake's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Over the Hill
    Just a thought, everybody seems to be recommending BJJ or some sort of grappling arts, which is fine but it strikes me that we are all assuming that the person has access to a quality school. I think sometimes the important thing is a really good and experienced instructor with a real world perspective?
    That person may well be teaching a bjj style, or not?
    Judo has been suggested.
    Bjj has been suggested.


    Heck your quality instruction explanation applies to other arts. People tend to recommend these arts due to the statistics in America and the quality control.

    There are quite a bit more bogus "other style" art as opposed to Judo and BJJ which are easily verified. No lineage don't go.

  6. #46
    jnp's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by jdinca
    Whatever you do, make sure it involves more than just stand up, or ground work. BJJ is great for ground work but it's one dimension of the training you need. It would be much more preferable if you got some training that could help you get out of the situation before it went to the ground, especially if you have small children you may need to protect also. Use something like BJJ to supplement that because you can't necessarily control what happens.

    Awareness of your surroundings will be the best self defense you can learn.
    With all the BJJ endorsements flying around, let's not forget what jdinca said. Ground grappling is one-third of the non-weapons ranges of martial arts. You would be remiss if you neglected the stand-up range in your training zone5girl.
    Shut the hell up and train.

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