223534 Bullies, 3581 online  
  • Register
Our Sponsors:

Results 31 to 36 of 36
Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234
Sponsored Links Spacer Image
  1. truepwrz is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    773

    Posted On:
    7/08/2008 11:34pm


     Style: Boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    any good ideas for to me to incorperate weights into a muay thai routine of 5-6days/week 2-3hours a day with running everymorning?
  2. LI GUY 1 is offline
    LI GUY 1's Avatar

    GIJoe6186 like boys, mainly his brother

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Long Island
    Posts
    2,561

    Posted On:
    7/09/2008 12:55am

    supporting member
     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by truepwrz
    any good ideas for to me to incorperate weights into a muay thai routine of 5-6days/week 2-3hours a day with running everymorning?
    I have one, stop running all together and lift 2-3 days a week instead. Running is great but you have all that Muay Thai for conditioning, adding running into the mix brings you diminishing returns.
  3. Teh El Macho is offline
    Teh El Macho's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Porcupine/Hollywood, FL & Parmistan via Elbonia
    Posts
    11,762

    Posted On:
    7/09/2008 8:53am

    supporting member
     Style: creonte on hiatus

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Angry-Monkey
    does deloading constitute a complete cessation of activities or just decreased working weight?

    usually I'll just take a week off lifting entirely when I start getting really exhausted, should I just lift less instead?
    Depends. Supposedly, a deloading week is simply lifting with less weight and intensity (and usually less volume). Some programs are based on that.

    Others simply put the person to do more cardio and a bit of bodyweight exercises. Others simply stop.

    The whole idea of keep lifting (or exercising by other means) during deloading is that movement in itself helps the body recover. Active recovery (recovery while still engaging in physical activities) is usually better than passive recovery.

    Now, I imagine you are still doing MA on that week off lifting, so in essence, you are still doing a form of active recovery. I wouldn't worry about changing anything.

    Also, remember that deloading needs to be proactively scheduled. It needs to be periodic, or at least that's what one should aim at.

    We shouldn't deload as a result of feeling really exhausted ;) Because, then, it can take longer to recover.
    Read this for flexibility and injury prevention, this, this and this for supplementation, this on grip conditioning, and this on staph. New: On strenght standards, relationships and structural balance. Shoulder problems? Read this.

    My crapuous vlog and my blog of training, stuff and crap. NEW: Me, Mrs. Macho and our newborn baby.

    New To Weight Training? Get the StrongLifts 5x5 program and Rippetoe's "Starting Strength, 2nd Ed". Wanna build muscle/gain weight? Check this article. My review on Tactical Nutrition here.

    t-nation - Dissecting the deadlift. Anatomy and Muscle Balancing Videos.

    The street argument is retarded. BJJ is so much overkill for the street that its ridiculous. Unless you're the idiot that picks a fight with the high school wrestling team, barring knife or gun play, the opponent shouldn't make it past double leg + ground and pound - Osiris
  4. Emevas is offline
    Emevas's Avatar

    Dysfunctionally Strong

    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Minot AFB, ND
    Posts
    6,788

    Posted On:
    7/09/2008 11:46am

    supporting member
     Style: Boxing/Wrestling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I deload by volume rather than weight, and tend to work about 70% of my previous workout's volume. If I did 5x5 last time, I'll keep the weight the same and do either 3x5 or 5x3.
    "Emevas,
    You're a scrapper, I like that."-Ronin69
  5. Teh El Macho is offline
    Teh El Macho's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Porcupine/Hollywood, FL & Parmistan via Elbonia
    Posts
    11,762

    Posted On:
    7/09/2008 8:44pm

    supporting member
     Style: creonte on hiatus

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    He, just as I was looking through my bookmarks on the t-nation stuff about detecting overtraining, Chris Thibaudeau just posted three super articles on training.

    Check his post in this discussion:

    http://www.t-nation.com/tmagnum/disc....do?id=2313225

    Chris Thibaudeau:
    You've been training really hard, eating well, and using the best supplements, yet you're not progressing at a satisfactory rate. Sound familiar?

    Well, you might very well be dipping into an overtraining state, be it neural, muscular, or both. But how can you know if you're doing too much? The following simple measurements, if taken every day, can give you a good idea if something is wrong and what needs fixing.

    A) Heart Rate Measures

    A1. Morning (resting) heart rate: This is one of the simplest yet most straightforward ways of knowing if you're performing an excessive amount of high intensity training. Here's how to use this tool:

    �?� You must take this measure first thing in the morning upon waking to avoid fluctuations due to daily activities.

    �?� You must always take your measurement in the same position. If you start by taking your pulse lying down, then all of your measures must also be taken in this position because body position influences resting heart rate. Your RHR is 6-8 beats per minute higher sitting compared to lying down, and 2-4 BPM higher standing compared to sitting. So there can be up to a 12 BPM difference between taking your HR standing up or lying down.

    �?� Measure your heart rate by placing your fingers on the carotid artery. Avoid applying too much pressure as this artificially reduces heart rate by activating the baroreceptors.



    �?� Measure for a full 60 seconds, not 15 seconds multiplied by 4 (this quadruples the margin of error).

    �?� If your RHR is elevated by 3-5 BPM above baseline, you have a slight overexcitation of the sympathetic nervous system, which might indicate incomplete recovery from high intensity work.

    �?� If your RHR is elevated by more than 6 BPM above baseline, there's a significant neural overstrain due to excessive high intensity work.

    �?� If there's a drastic reduction in RHR compared to your baseline, this indicates CNS inhibition which is a sign of type II (addisonic) overtraining. This rarely occurs with strength athletes though; it's typically due to an excessive volume of endurance work.

    A2. Heart rate after cold immersion: This is another effective way of clueing us in on the status of our nervous system (specifically its excitability). It consists of comparing two different heart rates one after the other. You take the first one sitting down (relax for 1-2 minutes before measuring your pulse). Afterwards you dip your right hand up to the wrist into very cold water and keep it there for 45 seconds. You then immediately take the second measurement. Finally, calculate the difference between both.

    A sympathetic nervous system with normal function should lead to an increase in 4-8 BPM under cold conditions. If the increase is above 10 BPM, it indicates sympathetic overactivity which might mean a potential basedowic overtraining state (too much high intensity work). If the increase is lower than 4 BPM this can indicate sympathetic inhibition, which could mean a potential addisonic overtraining state (too much volume).

    A3. Post-workout heart rate: After a training session, heart rate should gradually go down toward baseline level. One hour after a workout, a 10-20% elevation compared to resting heart rate (RHR) is desired.

    If the heart rate is more than 20% above the RHR, it indicates that the workload was excessively stressful on the body and nervous system. If the heart rate is elevated by less than 10% above the RHR, it means that the workload for the session was below the capacity of the body to tolerate training and that future workloads can be higher if maximum results are desired.

    B) Other Measures

    B1. Morning grip strength: Grip strength tested with a hand dynamometer in the morning upon waking has been found by Soviet scientists to be strongly correlated with the working state of the CNS.



    If morning grip strength goes down by more than four pounds per hand, it indicates insufficient neural recovery and might necessitate a decrease in the amount of high-intensity training until strength returns to the baseline level.

    If morning grip strength goes up by more than four pounds per hand, it means that the CNS is primed to a maximal effort. This might be a good day to either go for a maximum lift or to increase the amount of high-intensity training you'll be performing.

    B2. Body temperature: Oral temperature taken in the morning can clue us in on the metabolic state of the body. Each decrease in temperature of one degree indicates a reduction of 5-10% of the metabolic rate. If that occurs, it's time for a few days of increased caloric consumption until the value returns to normal (established baseline).

    ps... the article this discussion comes from is this (third article of a four-article series): http://www.t-nation.com/readArticle.do?id=2313225
    Read this for flexibility and injury prevention, this, this and this for supplementation, this on grip conditioning, and this on staph. New: On strenght standards, relationships and structural balance. Shoulder problems? Read this.

    My crapuous vlog and my blog of training, stuff and crap. NEW: Me, Mrs. Macho and our newborn baby.

    New To Weight Training? Get the StrongLifts 5x5 program and Rippetoe's "Starting Strength, 2nd Ed". Wanna build muscle/gain weight? Check this article. My review on Tactical Nutrition here.

    t-nation - Dissecting the deadlift. Anatomy and Muscle Balancing Videos.

    The street argument is retarded. BJJ is so much overkill for the street that its ridiculous. Unless you're the idiot that picks a fight with the high school wrestling team, barring knife or gun play, the opponent shouldn't make it past double leg + ground and pound - Osiris
  6. Angry-Monkey is offline

    Welterweight

    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Toronto/Hamilton
    Posts
    593

    Posted On:
    7/09/2008 11:27pm

    supporting member
     Style: BJJ/Kickboxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Teh El Macho
    Depends. Supposedly, a deloading week is simply lifting with less weight and intensity (and usually less volume). Some programs are based on that.

    Others simply put the person to do more cardio and a bit of bodyweight exercises. Others simply stop.

    The whole idea of keep lifting (or exercising by other means) during deloading is that movement in itself helps the body recover. Active recovery (recovery while still engaging in physical activities) is usually better than passive recovery.

    Now, I imagine you are still doing MA on that week off lifting, so in essence, you are still doing a form of active recovery. I wouldn't worry about changing anything.

    Also, remember that deloading needs to be proactively scheduled. It needs to be periodic, or at least that's what one should aim at.

    We shouldn't deload as a result of feeling really exhausted ;) Because, then, it can take longer to recover.
    yeah I still train BJJ, kickboxing and MMA. I've been trying to schedule in a rest week every 5-6 weeks but sometimes I don't make it there. I know that that's a good indication that I should be taking a break earlier but I'm stubborn like that.
Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Powered by vBulletin™© contact@vbulletin.com vBulletin Solutions, Inc. 2011 All rights reserved.