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  1. NSLightsOut is offline
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    Posted On:
    6/25/2008 4:26pm


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Building skill level at a new BJJ club

    Well, it's been a long time to this point.

    I've been teaching my instructor's kids class for the past 4 years, in between everything else, and finally, a few weeks ago, I got the opportunity to teach my own adult classes at a new club, run out of one of my training partner's Aikido dojo, as head instructor. I have people wanting to train, marketing in progress, the works. The first class begins this evening.

    Whilst I have a pretty good idea how to teach, I need to ask one question of the established instructors posting here: What measures do you think helped build up the skill level in your clubs? Whilst I have been one of the senior members at my academy for the last year or so, I haven't really had to build a group of newbie white belts up to a decent level. Any tips that you could possibly have would be greatly appreciated.
  2. UpaLumpa is offline
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    Exasperated.

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    Posted On:
    6/25/2008 6:16pm

    supporting member
     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    This doesn't help at all, but the answer is:
    A critical mass of blues and purples.

    When I started at my school you were lucky if there was more than one or two blues there. Damn lucky if you ever got to roll with one of the purples. Now days people go from newbies to solid much more quickly because there are better training partners.

    Aside from that one of my favorite randori drills is also one that I think has been the most helpful. 3 minute rounds starting in back (down), then back (up), mount, side, half, in guard, opponent in your guard, under half, under side, under mount, etc. Exhausting but really drills the positions (and escapes). Either with or without subs (reset when position escaped.)
  3. datdamnmachine is offline
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    Jiu Jitsu - Sometimes passing just isn't an option.

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    Posted On:
    6/25/2008 7:31pm

    supporting member
     Style: BJJ, Unauthorized Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by UpaLumpa
    This doesn't help at all, but the answer is:
    A critical mass of blues and purples.

    When I started at my school you were lucky if there was more than one or two blues there. Damn lucky if you ever got to roll with one of the purples. Now days people go from newbies to solid much more quickly because there are better training partners.

    Aside from that one of my favorite randori drills is also one that I think has been the most helpful. 3 minute rounds starting in back (down), then back (up), mount, side, half, in guard, opponent in your guard, under half, under side, under mount, etc. Exhausting but really drills the positions (and escapes). Either with or without subs (reset when position escaped.)
    Good point. You need people better than you to work your defense, people less experienced to work you offense, and people around the same level to put them both together and flow with.

    Kinda generic but I think it gets the point across.
  4. NSLightsOut is offline
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    Posted On:
    6/25/2008 9:40pm


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by datdamnmachine
    Good point. You need people better than you to work your defense, people less experienced to work you offense, and people around the same level to put them both together and flow with.

    Kinda generic but I think it gets the point across.
    Firstly, I know that UpaLumpa actually bothered to read my initial posts. I can see you didn't.

    This is a NEW club - i.e. the skill level that exists is as follows:

    Me! - a decent purple, or at least the shiny competition trinkets say so - the head instructor.
    The Dojo Owner - he'd probably describe himself as a weak purple, recently promoted, oft injured in early to mid 40s, hence why I've been given the instructor title and he hasn't started a club as yet himself
    A Very Good if Somewhat Rusty Blue - A former training partner of mine. Admittedly I was bouncing off the walls when I heard he would be coming - meant I'd have help at times!
    One somewhat experienced white belt I used to train with
    Some other white belts I've never trained with who left other academies a while back
    Some newbies

    Now, I would love to have a few more purples and blues....but alas, were wishes but fishes I'd be eating sashimi by the bucket with a huge ****-eating grin on my face. I was more interested in how to lay the foundations to produce said purples and blues in the future from the perspective of people who have actually been there and done that
  5. UpaLumpa is offline
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    Exasperated.

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    Posted On:
    6/25/2008 10:16pm

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     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    From what I've seen at my school it really was just time.
    Besides that, maintaining a high level of athleticism too.
  6. dokomoy is offline

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    Posted On:
    6/26/2008 12:14am


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    If there aren't going to be many experienced players to make the beginners pay for there mistake then one of your first lessons needs to be on what NOT to do.

    For example at a school with experienced training partners you learn pretty quickly not to pass with one arm in and one arm out, but if your training partner doesn't know how to triangle off that people are going to pick up bad habits. The same is probably true for things like leaving your arms out when under side control/mount and giving up your back when you try to escape side control.
  7. datdamnmachine is offline
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    Jiu Jitsu - Sometimes passing just isn't an option.

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    Posted On:
    6/26/2008 12:50am

    supporting member
     Style: BJJ, Unauthorized Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by NSLightsOut
    Firstly, I know that UpaLumpa actually bothered to read my initial posts. I can see you didn't.

    This is a NEW club - i.e. the skill level that exists is as follows:

    Me! - a decent purple, or at least the shiny competition trinkets say so - the head instructor.
    The Dojo Owner - he'd probably describe himself as a weak purple, recently promoted, oft injured in early to mid 40s, hence why I've been given the instructor title and he hasn't started a club as yet himself
    A Very Good if Somewhat Rusty Blue - A former training partner of mine. Admittedly I was bouncing off the walls when I heard he would be coming - meant I'd have help at times!
    One somewhat experienced white belt I used to train with
    Some other white belts I've never trained with who left other academies a while back
    Some newbies

    Now, I would love to have a few more purples and blues....but alas, were wishes but fishes I'd be eating sashimi by the bucket with a huge ****-eating grin on my face. I was more interested in how to lay the foundations to produce said purples and blues in the future from the perspective of people who have actually been there and done that
    I read your post, did you read your post?


    Quote Originally Posted by NSLightsOut
    Well, it's been a long time to this point.

    I've been teaching my instructor's kids class for the past 4 years, in between everything else, and finally, a few weeks ago, I got the opportunity to teach my own adult classes at a new club, run out of one of my training partner's Aikido dojo, as head instructor. I have people wanting to train, marketing in progress, the works. The first class begins this evening.

    Whilst I have a pretty good idea how to teach, I need to ask one question of the established instructors posting here: What measures do you think helped build up the skill level in your clubs? Whilst I have been one of the senior members at my academy for the last year or so, I haven't really had to build a group of newbie white belts up to a decent level. Any tips that you could possibly have would be greatly appreciated.
    I'm not going to get in a flame war or a war of words with you because that's not what this forum is about. I just added to what UpaLumpa said. The fact is, if you don't have multiple ranked people there, the only thing that's going to help is time.

    Give it to them and don't rush them. They'll get it. And so will you.

    As for my experience:

    Me - Decent blue belt; close to purple from what my teacher keeps hinting at, very shitty in tournaments because I get way too nervous when competing.
  8. 3moose1 is offline
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    Posted On:
    6/26/2008 1:40am

    Join us... or die
     Style: MCMAP, BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Cassius Edit: I couldn't resist.
    Last edited by Cassius; 6/26/2008 5:45pm at .

    PROOF that I'm not a completely useless poster:
    http://www.bullshido.net/forums/show...0&postcount=58


    Quote Originally Posted by Cy Q. Faunce
    3moose1 is correct. Sig THAT, you fucker.

    Quote Originally Posted by sochin101 View Post
    I went out with a delightful young woman who was on a regimen of pills that made her taste of burned onions.
    That is not conducive to passionate cunnilingus, my friend, let me assure you.
    Quote Originally Posted by HappyOldGuy View Post
    I agree with moosey
  9. snowman is offline

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    Posted On:
    6/26/2008 1:58am


     Style: sadness and tears

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by NSLightsOut
    Firstly, I know that UpaLumpa actually bothered to read my initial posts. I can see you didn't.

    This is a NEW club - i.e. the skill level that exists is as follows:

    Me! - a decent purple, or at least the shiny competition trinkets say so - the head instructor.
    The Dojo Owner - he'd probably describe himself as a weak purple, recently promoted, oft injured in early to mid 40s, hence why I've been given the instructor title and he hasn't started a club as yet himself
    A Very Good if Somewhat Rusty Blue - A former training partner of mine. Admittedly I was bouncing off the walls when I heard he would be coming - meant I'd have help at times!
    One somewhat experienced white belt I used to train with
    Some other white belts I've never trained with who left other academies a while back
    Some newbies

    Now, I would love to have a few more purples and blues....but alas, were wishes but fishes I'd be eating sashimi by the bucket with a huge ****-eating grin on my face. I was more interested in how to lay the foundations to produce said purples and blues in the future from the perspective of people who have actually been there and done that
    This isn't from an instructors POV, but you have basically described my BJJ classes, there are 2-3 good technical if not sparadoic blues, instructor is a purple and a few whole bunch of whites with varying levels on their technique and experience, we work the basics alot, everyone rolls with everyone so we can get the most out of everyones attributes, let them ask alot of questions, have a good vibe in the club, and keep it interesting at times
  10. Angry-Monkey is offline

    Welterweight

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    Toronto/Hamilton
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    Posted On:
    6/26/2008 7:56am

    supporting member
     Style: BJJ/Kickboxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I've been running a little recreational club here at my university for the past couple of years. Started it as a blue (I'm still a blue). The hardest part for me was the students' schedules. Not many of them were able to make it out to the two classes a week so it was very difficult for them to make progress.

    Stress the importance of regular and consistent training above all else. Give them plenty of resources to study on their own time if they cant train more than 2-3 times per week.

    I found that by teaching my classes in 'themes' I could get them to grasp things a lot easier.

    Try to attract other people with experience that are currently in between clubs. I've made some great new friends from other clubs at my level as well as better that are away from their home clubs due to school. I leave the doors open and let people know that we're just there to train and not to worry about politics.

    ROLL with all of them as much as possible. Everyone is stressing the fact that people with more and better training partners will progress faster. You have to be that training partner. Switch up how you play, don't get stuck playing your style.

    edit: and have fun! I know you mentioned you've been teaching kids classes for the next 4 years so you can understand how rewarding it is to see people get better. It's a great feeling taking someone from no experience to a respectable level of competence.
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