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  1. MrHuggables is offline

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    Posted On:
    6/23/2008 8:53pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Muay Thai

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Any righties prefer fighting southpaw?

    Recently while sparring i got thrown to the mat pretty bad and landed awful on left side, hurting my left shoulder and elbow. I couldn't really throw a jab or front hook in orthodox stance, and as I often switch to southpaw every so often i thought why not, let me make it my primary stance. I disliked it at first, but now, even as my arm is getting better, I'm starting to become more and more accustomed to it, liking it even more than orthodox.

    I really like the added finesse and agility my (now right-handed) jab has, and quite frankly, partially thanks to my old karate teacher always making us do EVERYTHING both left and right handed, my left cross is only a slight step shorter in power than my right. But the ability to throw an even more powerful front hook i think makes up for it.

    Kicks haven't become a problem either, as i use them in a very situational manner, so i'm used to having to quickly switch stances if the opportunity is open for a nice strike.



    Of course, it must be noted that i don't keep EXCLUSIVELY in southpaw. i still often switch back to orthodox; really, its just i start off with the initial southpaw stance and work my way around from there. Its like a 60/40 ratio now, the same it would be if i was fighting orthodox except obviously inversed.




    So what are your all's thoughts?
  2. Anna Kovacs is offline
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    Posted On:
    6/23/2008 8:58pm

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     Style: Dancing the Spears

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    That fighters who learn to fight in "both stances" are usually mediocre on both sides.
  3. MrHuggables is offline

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    Posted On:
    6/23/2008 9:09pm

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     Style: Muay Thai

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    Quote Originally Posted by AnnaTrocity
    That fighters who learn to fight in "both stances" are usually mediocre on both sides.


    Wow, i didn't used to think this but the convincing evidence with a great example you posted really made me see the light!


    EDIT: Roy Jones Jr. would also like to have a word with you
  4. Anna Kovacs is offline
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    Posted On:
    6/23/2008 9:11pm

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     Style: Dancing the Spears

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    I'm sorry Mr Jones, I didn't realize who I was speaking to.
  5. G-Off is offline
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    Posted On:
    6/23/2008 9:23pm


     Style: Ronin wannabe

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I'm agreeing with Anna. People who switch a lot often tend to rely on switching to confuse people rather than being really good at either side when striking.

    There are exceptions, of course, Anderson Silva being the best one.
  6. MrHuggables is offline

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    Posted On:
    6/23/2008 9:32pm

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    Quote Originally Posted by G-Off
    I'm agreeing with Anna. People who switch a lot often tend to rely on switching to confuse people rather than being really good at either side when striking.

    There are exceptions, of course, Anderson Silva being the best one.

    SEe, that's the dividing line. Those who switch to confuse, and those who switch to adapt.

    Let's face it. In a fight, you're not going to stay in one stance. You're moving around, constantly avoiding while attacking at the same time. Can you honestly say that training in just one stance, which in a fight you will hardly be in the entire time, is superior to training in multiple stances, which as you AND your opponent are constantly moving will no doubt turn up sooner or later? The more options, the better.

    Its like a fight between a boxer and a mixed martial artist. Sure, the boxer is a damn good puncher, as thats all he trains. The MMAer will most likely not be able to take him on based on simply punches, but he can use his OPTIONS like going in for the clinch+knee, kicks, and takedowns to outfight the boxer.



    EDIT: This discussion is also not the point of this topic anyway. In case you're forgetting the topic title is "Any righties prefer fighting southpaw?" Not "Do you think being able to switch stances makes you a better fighter?" :|
    Last edited by MrHuggables; 6/23/2008 9:38pm at .
  7. G-Off is offline
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    Posted On:
    6/23/2008 9:43pm


     Style: Ronin wannabe

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    Quote Originally Posted by MrHuggables
    SEe, that's the dividing line. Those who switch to confuse, and those who switch to adapt.

    Let's face it. In a fight, you're not going to stay in one stance. You're moving around, constantly avoiding while attacking at the same time. Can you honestly say that training in just one stance, which in a fight you will hardly be in the entire time, is superior to training in multiple stances, which as you AND your opponent are constantly moving will no doubt turn up sooner or later? The more options, the better.

    Its like a fight between a boxer and a mixed martial artist. Sure, the boxer is a damn good puncher, as thats all he trains. The MMAer will most likely not be able to take him on based on simply punches, but he can use his OPTIONS like going in for the clinch+knee, kicks, and takedowns to outfight the boxer.
    That's true, there is a difference between people who switch to confuse and who switch because they're comfortable with either. The problem is, most people are good at different things with different legs forward, so if you can figure out what they're good at on what side, they end up telegraphing.

    Example: A sparring partner of mine has a good sidekick, but only off his right leg. So when he throws a jab with his right leg forward, I know to expect the sidekick behind it. With the left leg forward, I know it's not going to be a front leg kick coming behind the jab.

    Also, staying in the same stance is entirely possible. Stance is important, to be sure...but it's not nearly the difference between boxing and MMA. It's just having a different foot/hand forward, not a completely different skill/rule set.

    Quote Originally Posted by MrHuggables
    EDIT: This discussion is also not the point of this topic anyway. In case you're forgetting the topic title is "Any righties prefer fighting southpaw?" Not "Do you think being able to switch stances makes you a better fighter?" :|
    True, but it's certainly relevant, and I think it could turn into a good discussion.All the above reasons are why I generally try not to switch stance very often. I do anyways though...damn point sparring.

    In any case, you're right. I guess an even more relevant discussion would be whether you prefer your strong hand forward or back. If you want to make them equal, than the switching stance discussion is relevant.
    Last edited by G-Off; 6/23/2008 9:47pm at .
  8. Deadmeat is offline
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    Posted On:
    6/23/2008 9:45pm


     Style: Mixed Martial Arts

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I know this is strikestan and this is kinda off topic, but one of the best judo players I've ever trained with has developed a style where he grips left handed but throws right. People have a hard time entering in, and his throws are really effective.

    I am right handed, but I like to box southpaw. Kickboxing, I prefer orthodox stance.
  9. MrHuggables is offline

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    Posted On:
    6/23/2008 9:56pm

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     Style: Muay Thai

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by G-Off
    True, but it's certainly relevant, and I think it could turn into a good discussion.All the above reasons are why I generally try not to switch stance very often. I do anyways though...damn point sparring.

    In any case, you're right. I guess an even more relevant discussion would be whether you prefer your strong hand forward or back. If you want to make them equal, than the switching stance discussion is relevant.

    No worries, I wasn't trying to discourage discussion, as your comments were very productive. The more you know... :P
  10. G-Off is offline
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    Posted On:
    6/23/2008 10:03pm


     Style: Ronin wannabe

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    Quote Originally Posted by MrHuggables
    No worries, I wasn't trying to discourage discussion, as your comments were very productive. The more you know... :P
    I think BL was a proponent of fighting with your strong hand forward...do you find having the strong hand forward changes your strategy at all? Personally I feel like I have to be more aggressive, since my weaker hand/foot is back and thus can't deliver that nice, powerful cross to someone who charges me. So I have to be the aggressor and impose my strong front hand on them first.
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