228221 Bullies, 4557 online  
  • Register
Our Sponsors:

Results 21 to 30 of 32
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 123 4 LastLast
Sponsored Links Spacer Image
  1. Firehawk is offline

    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1

    Posted On:
    7/05/2008 4:29am

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Stick with your kickboxing stance - I'd focus more on the handwork of boxing and worry less about the footwork because it's generally going to be irrelevant to you as a kickboxer/MMA fighter (not necessarily movement, but most certainly stance, as it's not intended to prepare you to kick).
  2. Anna Kovacs is offline
    Anna Kovacs's Avatar

    Spear Sister

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Las Vegas, NV
    Posts
    6,421

    Posted On:
    7/05/2008 6:05am

    supporting membersupporting member
     Style: Dancing the Spears

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by MMAMickey
    iv changed my stance recently to have the weight distributed relatively evenly between both feet and stay on the toes.. it helps a little bit for avoiding leg kicks just because you can lift up your leg easier.

    Congratulations, you just figured out how to stand correctly to maximize all your weapons. I can only assume that you had your weight more forward before.

    If your weight was more in the back before then you should have noticed that you actually had an easier time checking kicks. In fact if you watch a lot of traditional thai style fighters they just hang back with almost all their weight entirely on their back foot and kind of bouncing their front foot up and down.
  3. Anna Kovacs is offline
    Anna Kovacs's Avatar

    Spear Sister

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Las Vegas, NV
    Posts
    6,421

    Posted On:
    7/05/2008 6:12am

    supporting membersupporting member
     Style: Dancing the Spears

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Ming Loyalist
    i have been noticing that they don't like when i use footwork when striking, i.e. taking a 45degree angle step forward with my lead foot when i throw a cross (to open up my hip and cover distance.) of course i bring the back foot up as well keeping my feet shoulder width apart the whole time. instead they harp on me just raising the rear heel when i throw a cross.

    They should be harping on you turning your hip and shoulder as a singular unit. Not just on the back foot. It's a mistake I see a lot of coaches make(telling people to turn the foot but neglecting to emphasize the hip and shoulder as a unit). Your hip and shoulder are the most important. If you do that part properly your foot is going to turn on it's own anyways and then you can work in making the foot add to the power, but the hip and shoulder remaining connected is the absolute most important thing when throwing a cross. This maximizes the transfer of power and ensures you dont overreach and offbalance yourself.

    There's a possibility that they dont want you using footwork yet because they dont like the way your cross looks and want to minimize the movement until you get it the way they want it.

    IE; I have troubles with the left hook when standing still. My old coach, were I still with him, would probably ream me out over the way I throw my left hook, For whatever reason I dont feel like I am generating the power I want when I stand still and throw it, so I make a small leap to the right and thus I dont have to worry about turning my hip more then what feels comfortable for me. He would probably have me stand still and isolate and correct my motion until he was satisfied with me doing it the way he wanted while standing completely still and then allow me to add the footwork I like.

    So there, now i've just taught everyone a cheater tactic on how to have a mighty left hook without being technical, hooray.
    Last edited by Anna Kovacs; 7/05/2008 6:26am at .
  4. MMAMickey is offline
    MMAMickey's Avatar

    POWERRR!

    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    England
    Posts
    2,743

    Posted On:
    7/06/2008 12:41pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Boxing.MMA

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by AnnaTrocity
    Congratulations, you just figured out how to stand correctly to maximize all your weapons. I can only assume that you had your weight more forward before.
    yeh most of the weight forward was great for power but alot of the more skilled weaker guys who moved better could pretty much take the piss out of me.. it only became a problem when i started fighting more skilled opponents, the ones i fought before who don't move very well were too easy to catch and damage
  5. chi-conspiricy is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    China
    Posts
    348

    Posted On:
    7/11/2008 3:11pm


     Style: Poor mma

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by MMAMickey
    yeh most of the weight forward was great for power but alot of the more skilled weaker guys who moved better could pretty much take the piss out of me.. it only became a problem when i started fighting more skilled opponents, the ones i fought before who don't move very well were too easy to catch and damage
    Most of the weight forward is great for power? Power comes from you transitioning your weight forward and rotation, how the hell do you get that if most of your weight is already on your front foot as you described?

    50/50 distribution for the win.
  6. Govithoy is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    114

    Posted On:
    7/11/2008 9:54pm


     Style: MMA

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by AnnaTrocity
    They should be harping on you turning your hip and shoulder as a singular unit. Not just on the back foot. It's a mistake I see a lot of coaches make(telling people to turn the foot but neglecting to emphasize the hip and shoulder as a unit). Your hip and shoulder are the most important. If you do that part properly your foot is going to turn on it's own anyways and then you can work in making the foot add to the power, but the hip and shoulder remaining connected is the absolute most important thing when throwing a cross. This maximizes the transfer of power and ensures you dont overreach and offbalance yourself.
    This was a big one for me. Coaches just harped on "pushing off the back foot" at boxing for over 2 months. I didn't make it through a class at MT before the instructor there spotted the problem.

    Lately, my experience is that the different styles are getting me in **** at the respective gyms. At boxing, my lead hand is too far out in front and I'm too squared up; at MT apparently my lead hand's too close in and I'm always angling off.

    If I can just find some happy middle ground that won't piss off my trainers, that'd be fantastic.
  7. Anna Kovacs is offline
    Anna Kovacs's Avatar

    Spear Sister

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Las Vegas, NV
    Posts
    6,421

    Posted On:
    7/11/2008 11:20pm

    supporting membersupporting member
     Style: Dancing the Spears

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Eh, everyone does things a little differently. This isn't even a stylistic thing, this is just a difference between instructors who are looking at different aspects of what you're doing and trying to make you be more like them.

    You'll never find anything that will please everyone.
  8. Ming Loyalist is offline
    Ming Loyalist's Avatar

    solves problems with violence

    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    4,356

    Posted On:
    7/12/2008 2:11pm

    supporting member
     Style: Judo, Hung Family Boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by AnnaTrocity
    They should be harping on you turning your hip and shoulder as a singular unit. Not just on the back foot. It's a mistake I see a lot of coaches make(telling people to turn the foot but neglecting to emphasize the hip and shoulder as a unit). Your hip and shoulder are the most important. If you do that part properly your foot is going to turn on it's own anyways and then you can work in making the foot add to the power, but the hip and shoulder remaining connected is the absolute most important thing when throwing a cross. This maximizes the transfer of power and ensures you dont overreach and offbalance yourself.
    yes, i think that i turn my hip and shoulder together when i throw a cross (at least i know that i am supposed to, and i do when i'm shadowboxing and watching in the mirror.) i'll see if i can't get some video of me doing bagwork (both "my" way and "their"way) and you can tell me what you think.

    There's a possibility that they dont want you using footwork yet because they dont like the way your cross looks and want to minimize the movement until you get it the way they want it.
    i thought this might be the case as well. i have been absent from the place for a little while and am planning on going back soon. i was hoping that going more consistantly would lead to more detailed instruction.

    IE; I have troubles with the left hook when standing still. My old coach, were I still with him, would probably ream me out over the way I throw my left hook, For whatever reason I dont feel like I am generating the power I want when I stand still and throw it, so I make a small leap to the right and thus I dont have to worry about turning my hip more then what feels comfortable for me. He would probably have me stand still and isolate and correct my motion until he was satisfied with me doing it the way he wanted while standing completely still and then allow me to add the footwork I like.

    So there, now i've just taught everyone a cheater tactic on how to have a mighty left hook without being technical, hooray.
    sounds a lot like a way we throw the hook in my kung fu school (well ONE way we throw a hook, anyway.) it doesn't seem like a cheater move to me, but i usually only use it against southpaws.

    thanks for the advice and i'll try to up some vids.
    "Face punches are an essential character building part of a martial art. You don't truly love your children unless you allow them to get punched in the face." - chi-conspiricy
    "When I was a little boy, I had a sailor suit, but it didn't mean I was in the Navy." - Mtripp on the subject of a 5 year old karate black belt
    "Without actual qualifications to be a Zen teacher, your instructor is just another roundeye raping Asian culture for a buck." - Errant108
    "Seriously, who gives a **** what you or Errant think? You're Asian males, everyone just ignores you, unless you're in a krotty movie." - new2bjj
  9. MMAMickey is offline
    MMAMickey's Avatar

    POWERRR!

    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    England
    Posts
    2,743

    Posted On:
    7/14/2008 11:17am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Boxing.MMA

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by chi-conspiricy
    Most of the weight forward is great for power? Power comes from you transitioning your weight forward and rotation, how the hell do you get that if most of your weight is already on your front foot as you described?

    50/50 distribution for the win.
    the same way as when you punch from evenly distributed weight. you end up with your weight transferring really fast from the back leg to the front because your weight is always forward. it does make your movement slow as **** though, i'm not disagreeing that even distribution of weight is much more useful, iv found that my attacks are much harder to avoid now
  10. Sang is offline
    Sang's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    2,248

    Posted On:
    7/14/2008 11:47am


     Style: MMA, Yoga

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    The reason is this chi-conspiricy: when throwing a straight or even a jab you take a small step while doing it, so even if all your weight is on the front, for that brief moment in time your body weight is moving forward and you gain all that power.

    Weight on the back leg for ease in teeping off the front or checking with the front leg. Weight on the front leg for faster roundhouses (both frontleg and rear) and checking with the back leg. If you have most of the weight on either it can really hurt your mobility as well as signal your intentions (i.e. when i see someone tapping their front foot i know it means they're loading a teep so i get ready to catch it).
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 123 4 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Powered by vBulletin™© contact@vbulletin.com vBulletin Solutions, Inc. 2011 All rights reserved.