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  1. Rakenmaru is offline

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    Posted On:
    6/02/2008 10:36am

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Muay Thai/BJJ(Novice)

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Principals of Striking

    There are many more than listed, but this covers the basics. A combination of striking principals from different styles. I found this very helpful.

    1. Timing of muscular tension - The striker relaxes to the extent possible during the strike, tensing the muscles of much of the body only at the time of impact, then relaxing again to recoil the striking part. Relaxation enables the strike to achieve the greatest possible velocity during travel, while rigidity at impact allows the maximum transfer of force. This principle is summarized as: "Move like a whip and hit like a baseball bat."
    2. Breath control - Practitioners may include a kiai or shout, to help tense the muscles at impact and distract or frighten the opponent. Strikers generally exhale as the strike nears the target. Breath control is also important to relax the body when not attacking; novice strikers often bleed significant energy because they are tense at inappropriate times.
    3. Penetration - Strikes should aim for a point 4-6 inches (10-15cm) behind the target surface, to impart the most energy into the target. The striker in combat should attempt to strike through the target area, not just contact the surface.
    4. Focus - Strikes should channel force through a small area of the attacker's body. For example, this is the knuckles of the middle finger and index finger during a karate reverse punch, or the crescent/blade of the foot in a TKD side kick technique. Focus helps in achieving proper penetration and in maximizing the damage at the point of impact.
    5. Summation of force - Muscles are activated in a precise sequence to maximize the force generated. Strikes should generally be thrown with some measure of shifting body weight supporting the blow, as opposed to just the striking arm or leg. For example, in the straight lead made famous by Bruce Lee, the traditional boxing jab is made more forceful by driving off the rear leg and shifting body weight into the blow, while twisting the trunk and shoulder to further enhance the striking force.
    6. Footwork - Proper footwork is used to enable the proper balancing of the body, to support combinations of strikes and launch strikes from the proper angle or distance. This is among the most complex elements of striking, as power ultimately flows from the legs in striking and optimizing the ability to throw combinations involves precise footwork.
    7. Combinations - Strikers may use combinations of techniques to ensure one or more strikes impact their opponents. These attacks are thrown at various targets on the body, with the greatest force typically thrown with a particular technique in the sequence.
    8. Level of attack - The height of attack is often varied, such as a jab to the head followed by a kick to the ribs. By varying the level of attack, strikers open the guard of their opponent.
    9. Timing and Rhythm - Experienced strikers learn through repetition and muscle memory when (not just how) to launch particular strikes, based on the circumstances they are facing. Fights and fighters may have ebbs and flows in momentum and action that become predictable. Disrupting this flow may give the striker an advantage.
    10. Avoid "telegraphing" - Telegraphing refers to moving the striking body part prior to actually launching the blow. Telegraphing signals the intent to the opponent and increases the likelihood the strike will not be effective. In general, the striking weapon should move first, with the body driving behind it. This requires proper distancing and footwork.
    11. Deception - Strikers use feints or distractions to disguise the timing or direction of their attacks. Stomping the foot, noise, frequent hand movement, head movement, switching the guard position, etc. are common feints. Using feints, then attacking at multiple levels and with various techniques may help deceive the opponent, defeating their guard.
    12. Gravity - Strikes that go from high to low like hammerfists, downwards elbows, and stomp kicks see their force enhanced by gravity.
      #1
  2. It is Fake is offline
    It is Fake's Avatar

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    Posted On:
    6/02/2008 10:38am

    staff
     Style: xingyi

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    You got in trouble in High School didn't you?

    Principle.

    Did you write this or is it taken from somewhere.
      #2
  3. Domite is offline
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    blotter art.

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    Posted On:
    6/02/2008 10:44am


     Style: San Shou

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Taken, I think:

    Quote Originally Posted by Rakenmaru
    I found this very helpful.
      #3
  4. MMAMickey is offline
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    POWERRR!

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    Posted On:
    6/02/2008 11:55am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Boxing.MMA

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    makes sense but does anybosy actually consider all this when they throw a punch?

    to me its like looking up the theory of dancing and expecting to be justin timberlake
      #4
  5. Rakenmaru is offline

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    Posted On:
    6/02/2008 12:03pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Muay Thai/BJJ(Novice)

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    A friend of mine showed it to me. I think it is from wikipedia.
      #5

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