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  1. mike321 is online now

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    Posted On:
    6/01/2008 4:04pm


     Style: kenpo, Wrestling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Emevas

    It doesn't really address my original question though: why do people want to combine the activities and get mediocre (at best) results when they can perform one activity well and get great results? Like, what could weights add to running that running with extra intensity can't accomplish? Or a running parachute/sled?
    I don't know the benefit if any. That was actually one of the original questions.
  2. muddy is offline

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    Posted On:
    6/01/2008 5:50pm


     Style: boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Emevas
    No, circuit training tends to be done in the form of a circuit, with multiple exercises for high repititions and short rest periods in between exercises, rather than running in place while in the middle of an exercise or sprinting between sets of heavy exercises.

    It doesn't really address my original question though: why do people want to combine the activities and get mediocre (at best) results when they can perform one activity well and get great results? Like, what could weights add to running that running with extra intensity can't accomplish? Or a running parachute/sled?

    There have been some studies that concluded that adding a weight vest to a normal routine in a group of atheletes resulted in an improved VO2max (compared to a control group with no vest) ... the vest was 10% or less of bodyweight ... (google Rusko and vest)

    It could be a psychological effect, I guess ... maybe the vest participants cranked up the effort (without conciously realizing it) therefore not letting the vest proportionally affect the speed and volume they worked.

    Regarding increased trauma issues raised earlier ... I dont see how the extra trauma of a vest would be an issue with a vest 10% over bodyweight ... I mean you wouldnt recommend that a 150 pound athelete give up running if he increased his natural weight to 165 lbs would you?
  3. Emevas is offline
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    Posted On:
    6/01/2008 5:56pm

    supporting member
     Style: Boxing/Wrestling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    But again, it's one group with weight vs. a group without weight that's not increasing their intensity correspondingly. My argument is, instead of saying "I'm going to wear Xlbs", why not say "I'm going to shave off 6 seconds from my last time" or "I'll run at an incline".

    In regards to the natural weight thing, the thing to keep in mind is that a vest is a vest, not 15lbs of natural weight. Typically, when an athlete gains 15lbs, it's distrubted through out the body, including weight in muscle supporting the joints, ligaments and tendons. It's also a gradual process, that your body can build up to and grow accustomed to. Throwing on a sudden amount of weight that sits only on your shoulders is gonna be vastly different.

    And of course weight can always be an issue with running...but I say this as a bitter 210lber that used to weigh 150 and still has to run because of the Air Force, haha.
    "Emevas,
    You're a scrapper, I like that."-Ronin69
  4. mike321 is online now

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    Posted On:
    6/01/2008 6:11pm


     Style: kenpo, Wrestling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Running hills is one thing I do. I should start timing myself and tracking distance. I run around my neighborhood, but google earth has a useful tool for tracking distance on a satellite photo. (Not complicated just sound like it is.) Timing is very simple to do.
  5. muddy is offline

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    Posted On:
    6/01/2008 6:21pm


     Style: boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Emevas: I agree with you (I think). There isnt anything magical about a vest. Its just a way to intensify.

    I personally wouldnt worry about 10% in regards to trauma for myself ... I do see your points though.
    Last edited by muddy; 6/01/2008 6:26pm at .
  6. muddy is offline

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    Posted On:
    6/01/2008 6:25pm


     Style: boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by mike321
    Running hills is one thing I do. I should start timing myself and tracking distance. I run around my neighborhood, but google earth has a useful tool for tracking distance on a satellite photo. (Not complicated just sound like it is.) Timing is very simple to do.
    Google Earth is awesome for this ... it is especially usefull for some runs I do that can't be driven to measure distance.
  7. Cassius is online now
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    Posted On:
    6/02/2008 8:02am

    supporting memberforum leader
     Style: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Emevas
    But again, it's one group with weight vs. a group without weight that's not increasing their intensity correspondingly. My argument is, instead of saying "I'm going to wear Xlbs", why not say "I'm going to shave off 6 seconds from my last time" or "I'll run at an incline".

    In regards to the natural weight thing, the thing to keep in mind is that a vest is a vest, not 15lbs of natural weight. Typically, when an athlete gains 15lbs, it's distrubted through out the body, including weight in muscle supporting the joints, ligaments and tendons. It's also a gradual process, that your body can build up to and grow accustomed to. Throwing on a sudden amount of weight that sits only on your shoulders is gonna be vastly different.

    And of course weight can always be an issue with running...but I say this as a bitter 210lber that used to weigh 150 and still has to run because of the Air Force, haha.
    Normally I tend to think that you give good advice, but I'm not sure where this rant is coming from. I realize that, in general, service in the Air Force does not require you to do anything particularly difficult, you know, physically. But a couple of the other branches of service have to, you know, run. Sometimes, with like, a bunch of heavy **** on our backs.

    Thinly veiled contempt aside: Running with weight isn't something I do regularly, but it is a good way to mix things up 3-4 times a month. Ruck Marches aside (I don't always run these), I have a couple workouts in particular that involve running short distances (2 miles or less) where I wear either a weighted vest, IBA, or flak vest for the entire workout . Speaking from experience, weighted running does not remotely have the same effect as sprinting, running with resistance, or short/medium/long distance running. It should also be noted that I have a reason for running with weight (ie, I may have to carry a bunch of heavy **** in my ruck sack as part of my job), so I do it occasionally. It is, in general, a big pain in the ass, and not something I recommend for people who don't have a reason to do it.

    Also: Fatty.
    Last edited by Cassius; 6/02/2008 8:05am at .
    "No. Listen to me because I know what I'm talking about here." -- Hannibal
  8. Emevas is offline
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    Posted On:
    6/02/2008 12:18pm

    supporting member
     Style: Boxing/Wrestling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Again, it makes sense if you have a specific purpose, my question was for the people that just ask "Hey, is it a good idea?"

    I think you and I are getting at the same point, in that you wouldn't recommend it for people that don't have a reason to do it.

    Also:

    Air Force
    Rejected
    Me
    Yesterday =P
    "Emevas,
    You're a scrapper, I like that."-Ronin69
  9. Eddie Hardon is offline

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    Posted On:
    6/02/2008 1:51pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Trad Ju Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I'm with Emevas (if I can get his bloody keyboard to work properly.

    For the OP, go to a Circuit Class 3 times a week and learn. By all means Run when you feel like it. In addition, you may learn to Dumbbell Dance, which is indeed running on the spot whilst performing Bicep Curls, Shoulder Presses, Forward Raises, Upright Rows and much more. You also get to promenade forwards and backwards in the Gym while you do these BUT (yes, it's a BIG BUT), you can only do this under a qualified Circuit Instructor. It is fundamentally a HEART exercise.

    That apart, by all means run with a Flak Jacket etc but don't be surprised if you pass out. Hopefully, someone will be on hand to facilitate your Recovery. If not wait until you are sign up for military service.

    Good luck.
  10. aaronh36 is offline

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    Posted On:
    6/02/2008 3:01pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: jiu jitsu, mma

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    ya i bought a weight vest and wanted to run with it on, well ya its like u guys said it definitely messes with ur joints. My knee is sore all the time now so running with any kind of weight is just bad. However i do go rounds of practicing combos and strikes with my weight vest and i have noticed its easier to keep my hands up and my conditioning is better too
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