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Thread: Tang Soo Do.

  1. #11

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Unfortunately, with the program I'm in, I'm locked into a contract 'till I'm a black belt.

  2. #12

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    conract=RED LIGHT!!!

  3. #13

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I sould've noticed that, but it was my parents who signed the thing 2 years ago. Well, at least most of my friends are black belts who teach me the stuff I need to know.

  4. #14
    Community Corrections Officer supporting member
    Matt W.'s Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    One thing I know for sure is that TSD schools don't have their heads up their asses like a lot of TKD schools.
    Really? When I first started training it was at a community center where the instructor taught hapkido and Tang Soo Do. I eventually switched to and ITF style of TKD. I saw little difference in the TSD and TKD techniques. Even the first couple basic forms were similar (which makes sense because both started as Korean Shotokan).

    TSD does jumping kicks, But In TSD I have spent an equal amount of time practicing knee and leg kicks.
    TKD has those techniques too, just as TSD has all the jumping spinning stuff. That is not a difference in technique, but in focus. And even that is irrelevant if you aren't training with contact and against full resistance. Focusing on "realistic technique" isn;t actually any more realistic unless you are training them realistically.

    Rather it focuses on the fundamentals and practicle techniques.
    That varies form school to school. All the ITF style schools I went to (3 in 2 different states) were very focused on basics and fundementals. Of course, in hindsight, that didn't really make it any more realistic since it was still trained without any "aliveness".

    The forms are Japanese and TSD admits to the fact the the style's roots are based on Japanese and chinese styles.
    Fortunately, many TKD schools are also starting to 'fess up to the fact that their roots are Korean Shotokan. Although I wonder about the supposed Chinese influence in TSD.

    The two TSD schools I work in do joint locks and have guest instructors from BJJ and Judo schools teach ground fighting
    Hey, crosstraining is great. But part of something like BJJ is also how it is trained. Unless you train it in the way BJJers train, it won't do you much good.

    So what is our taining like? Care to give a description?

    Regards,
    Matt

  5. #15
    KageReaper's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Holy ****...you signed a 2 year CON-tract! Fucking **** guy, that sucks. I had to sign a contract once. I went for the 6 month one. Glad I had the foresight that I MAY NOT LIKE THE SCHOOL. Dammit, caps came on, lol. Anyway..don't do that again, please for your own good. and if you do..find out if you can get out of it.
    ~Whatever Happens, Happens.~


    ~From this moment on, I shall be known as "He Who Smokes Bitches"~

  6. #16

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    This happened 2 years ago when I was like 12 and really had no idea what was going on. And it was a contract up until black belt. At the time the school was great. Its just as of late that things have deteriorated.

  7. #17

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    My school is TSD.

    We spend about 35% of our time on striking techniques, 10% on forms, 20% on grappling or joint lock material, and 35% on sparring. 0% on goofy flashy moves. Sparring is freeform standing and required for all yellow and up. Typically to wrap up we spar all vs. all, after three hits against you sit down; this trains situational awareness (among other things).

    There is no class fee and no testing fee. $5 for new belts covers the cost of ordering one. No fluff, no hype, just hard work; or else I wouldn't still be there.

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Oct 2002
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    At least you are more prepared to fight in real life in TSD than in TKD. I guess thats why TSD guys never wanted to hook up with the various TKD federation nonsense.
    Ghost of Charles Dickens

  9. #19
    OFFICIAL Mayor of Cwcville supporting member
    Boyd's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    If the guy kicks you like an utter jackass for crosstraining, I think he's gone beyond reason.
    Captain's Log: Just a little update for all my TRUE and HONEST friends out there:

    1) I am STRAIGHT! I am STRAIGHT! Get it through your thick skulls, numbskulls!

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    REMINDER: I am still the one and only true creator of sonichu and rosechu electric hedgehog pokemon

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Oct 2003
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I dont get the whole contract thing, why would you have to sign up for any kind of contract to take lessons in something?

    meh i dunno, i'm a tang soo do guy myself (only about 6 months mind), the training depends on who takes the class really, Master Tang sticks with the long winded move drills, a fair amount of the lessons on forms and then the next big chunk of the lesson on free fighting. We practice joint locks and take downs but not as common as the standard kicking moves ( where i can see the big comparison to TKD)
    If Master Tang is away like the past few lessons ( At internationals in Malaysia) we have Master Greenwood take the class, he's also a master of shotokan karate so he brings in a lot of that kind of stuff, he also teaches a more quick flowing class, practicing techniques (master greenwood also brings more takedowns into the lessons), then only about 10 minutes on forms and then onto free fighting for the rest of the lesson, although he always does finish on time unlike master tang who extends the lessons without fail :)

    So really the training varies which is always good i suppose

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