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  1. Happy Panda is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/28/2008 11:42am


     Style: Panda Punch

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    For what it's worth, I thought your hands looked pretty good for someone with Tae kwon do in their style field.

    The whole "no punching in the first round" thing was a really bad idea, you can't just let someone come forward and throw whatever they want without retaliation. Give him a few good counter shots on the way in and he'll start being a little more careful, otherwise you're just a walking punching bag.

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve
    Checking leg kicks with any part of the shin is retarded.
    Well that's embarrassing.
  2. Domite is offline
    Domite's Avatar

    blotter art.

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    Posted On:
    3/28/2008 11:49am


     Style: San Shou

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Yeah, for you and anyone else who has ever fought in any sport that involves kicking since the beginning of time. Face blox ONLY!
  3. Kintanon is offline
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    Yes, I am smarter than you are.

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    Posted On:
    3/28/2008 12:07pm

    supporting memberstaff
     Style: TKD, BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Rule of thumb for short people (I'm 5'7") you generally want to be as close to a taller opponent as possible. Makes it harder for them to hit you, but doesn't mess with your ability to throw hands as much. Hunker down well inside their range, to the point of forehead on their chest/chin if possible and unload. Every time he tries to back out to get range to hit you leg kick the crap out of him and dive right back in.
  4. MastaChance is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/28/2008 12:22pm


     Style: Muay Thai/BJJ/Boxing/MMA

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Tangent
    Here's the vid of my first amateur Muay Thai fight. I hope I embedded it correctly. I'm the shorter guy with the black gloves.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RQlGHDWXUKo

    There was a lot in this fight that I have no idea why I either did it, or DIDN'T do it. I'm thinking nerves, maybe? A lot of how I fought was nothing like how I trained for this fight, but my coach and I decided to change it up when we found out, on the night of the fight, that my opponent was significantly bigger than me. That was probably a bad idea, but I learned much.

    Anyway, please help me out and critique my fight, for better or worse. I will appreciate the input!

    Here's some additional information that might shed some light:

    I'm 5'8" and weighed in at 152. My opponent is 6'2" and weighed in at either 160 or 162, can't remember which. I've been doing martial arts for over 9 years, but only training Muay Thai since August of 07. My primary art prior to 2004 was TKD, but I've mixed it up a lot since then. I currently train at http://www.arizonamuaythai.com/ with Paul Metayo, who was the main coach for Alex Gong in California throughout Gong's entire career (as far as I know).

    Be more AGGRESSIVE. You were back peddaling the whole time, work on that for starters.
  5. Kempo Chris is offline
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    Posted On:
    3/28/2008 2:19pm


     Style: The Kempo, Kickboxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    You looked ok out their - I think you could of taken it if you threw more combos. You threw a lot of single shots - 1 punch, 1 kick hits. Whenever you threw a combo you hit him nice. Be more agressive and throw more combos.
    Props for getting in there. You'll get em next fight.
  6. Khun Kao is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/28/2008 2:34pm


     Style: MuayThai

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Aero's critique is pretty spot on... I would like to add a few things....

    1. Aero pointed out how difficult it is to effectively fight while backing up. It can be done... I've seen it happen! But you have to be DAMNED good. One of the primary problems with you fighting a retreating fight the way you did is that you were constantly backing up into your opponents optimal range.... You were putting yourself right where he could unleash power strikes on you. He was one of those big, tall, lanky, and awkward dudes. Some of his technique was sloppy and could have been taken advantage of had you not constantly backed away from him.

    2. Your guard was horrible. When fighting someone with that kind of reach advantage, you really need to "turtle up", especially while kicking. So many times, you kicked with your hands down, and ate punches.

    3. Yeah, you definitely allowed yourself to eat too many leg kicks. You were actually winning the 2nd round, until a little past the midway point where your opponent caught you with a leg kick that obviously affected you. The round was his after that point. Work more on blocking those....

    4. From what you've said of your coaches advice, it doesn't sound like it was very good. I'm sure your coach had his reasons. He knows you and how you've trained and how you've sparred. Unfortunately, his advice appeared to have been bad for this fight. But hey, I've made bad coaching decisions too. We're not right all the time, unfortunately.

    5. I don't know if it was Aero or someone else who said this, but you were NOT in fight condition. This may have been why your coach advised you to fight the way you did, as a way to compensate for inadequate conditioning. No matter what, you should truly focus on your conditioning if you intend to get back in there and fight again.

    6. I can completely appreciate how the late discovery of your opponents weight, height, and reach advantage can screw you up mentally. My two worst fight experiences were pretty similar, where I find out at the last minute some information that makes you 2nd guess your training and game plan. Once was due to a last minute change in opponents, and the other time was the exact same scenario as yours, where I found that my opponent was significantly bigger than I expected. It screws with your head in the worst way, and you end up fighting nothing like the way you've trained. Almost like you did a lot of hard work for nothing.....

    7. No matter what the result of the fight was and despite all of our critiques, CONGRATULATIONS for getting in there and doing it! The first fight is always the hardest. It takes balls to get in there and fight someone, and I think that you've done a decent job transitioning from TKD to MuayThai. You still need work (obviously), but you have every right to be proud of yourself.
  7. JohnnyCache is offline
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    All Out of Bubblegum

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    Posted On:
    3/28/2008 2:39pm

    supporting memberforum leader
     Style: MMA

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Broadly, I saw TKD waist high hands there, a lot. The default hand position needs to be particularly high when you're fighting a taller guy if you want to stop his right - and his right was stopping your fucking clock in there.

    The other major stylistic flaw was not necessarily that you were defensive, but that you were passively defensive. If I may speak for your coach, what he was looking for you to do was counter at opportune moments, not close up and give the pacing of the fight to your opponent. Once the other guy has that momentum, it's hard to take back.

    More specifically, your footwork was forgotten on your rights - that's why they fell short and got no respect. If you're going to work in on tall guys you need to work on slipping the second attack and working body-body-uppercut or body-body-elbow combos. Tight, driving forward footwork will make up distance and push you up against him.

    I didn't see you throw a single push kick. I saw a lot of single punches.

    Good stuff - your lead leg inside leg kick was on. I'd work on comboing with your outside lead leg kick, if one kick won't slow the guy's leg, throw two : ) You had gas. You were swinging right until the end.

    Don't beat yourself up too bad over it - beating a bigger guy like that involves having an unqualified skill advantage at some aspect of fighting.
    There's no choice but to confront you, to engage you, to erase you. I've gone to great lengths to expand my threshold of pain. I will use my mistakes against you. There's no other choice.
  8. Tangent is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/28/2008 7:21pm


     Style: Tae Kwon Do

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by thomaspaine

    Are knees to the head not allowed? There were a few times when you were bobbing and weaving that I thought your head was going to get kneed to the moon. But congrats on getting in there.
    That's correct, knees to the head were not allowed, elbows were not allowed at all, and sweeps were allowed but no points were given.

    To respond to a few people at once... yes, my TKD training still makes me exhibit bad habits. Among them are dropping my hands and my stance is too wide. I did throw a lot of singles, though I'm not sure why. I train a lot of kicks, but only really threw inside lead leg kicks. I'm not sure why I didn't do anything else, and my lead leg kick was lacking power.

    Also, I'm not sure why Khun Kao thought I wasn't in good condition for this fight. I actually worked on my conditioning a lot during my training, and used a lot of stuff from Ross Enamait (the guy behind Infinite Intensity), and I really felt like it helped me a lot. After the fight, if I hadn't taken that last leg kick, I could have gone two more rounds to be honest, both in muscle endurance and cardio. But Aero was right when he said that I didn't put in the work to win. I feel like I trained hard for this fight, but didn't put it to use in the ring.

    This critique is helping me a lot, though, so keep it coming if you can! Anyone else a smaller guy that has fought a lot of bigger opponents?
  9. JP is offline
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    It's all about the clinch. The clinch, I said.

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    Posted On:
    3/28/2008 9:30pm

    supporting member
     Style: SAMBO, mma, jiujitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I don't have anything to add in the way of critique, because I think there's been a lot of that offered and from far better sources than me.

    I just have a couple of observations.

    You're fast, and you move/evade well in regards to your footwork. This could be exaggerated because you're substantially smaller than your opponent, so you look faster by default, but either way.

    You did an excellent job of avoiding the clinch and I think a lot of your hesitancy to get in there and bang was out of fear of being on the losing side of a clinch fight. For my first and only muay thai rules fight I fought a guy who was in my weight class and a full 6 inches taller than me. Don't ask me how that happens.

    In addition to him just being better, I was also having a shitty night mentally and physically. I got my ass handed to me in the clinch and we'd worked our asses off in training to combat that. I even had a taller sparring partner. So good job avoiding the clinch.

    Also, I'm slightly jealous you got to fight in a nice big cage. I wish I had gotten to fight in a cage rather than the ring. I'm more used to, and felt more secure in the cage vs the ring.

    Anyway congrats for getting through the training, stepping up and taking the walk. Nobody can take that away from you.
    Go placidly amid the noise and haste,
    and remember what peace there may be in silence.
    As far as possible, without surrender,
    be on good terms with all persons.
    Speak your truth quietly and clearly;
    and listen to others,
    even to the dull and ignorant;
    they too have their story.

    -excerpt of the poem called "Desiderata," by Max Ehrman, 1927.
  10. Tangent is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/28/2008 10:27pm


     Style: Tae Kwon Do

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I definitely was kind of worried about the clinch. There are a bunch of videos from the previous Muay Thai match they had in the area, and there were a lot more MT fights that night than on the night that I fought. Anyway, 50% of those fights consisted of almost 75% clinch. I really didn't want my fight to turn into that, because at his height, he probably would have owned me.

    Hahaha you know, about the cage... that was another thing that threw me off. The entire time I was training, we thought I was going to be fighting in a ring. We showed up or the fight and saw a cage, and found out right then that I wasn't fighting in a ring. It was kind of intimidating, to be honest, but the floor was really grippy and there was a lot of room. It was just mentally weird to find that out right before the fight.

    Thanks for that last part. It's really only hitting me just now that I really, actually did this.
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