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  1. Mortification is offline

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    7

    Posted On:
    4/13/2008 2:55pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Taekwondo, and muay thai

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Wow thx all. All of this really helped especially the guide.
    Last edited by Mortification; 4/13/2008 2:59pm at .
  2. Asriel is offline
    Asriel's Avatar

    I'd like to leave this world like I came into it: Screaming, naked & covered in someone else's blood

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Essex
    Posts
    3,795

    Posted On:
    4/13/2008 3:56pm

    supporting member
     Style: Muay Thai (BJJ hiatus)

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    1. Turn up for class in shorts and a t-shirt.
    2. Listen to your instructor and do what he says.
    3. Do not **** about or talk when you're supposed to be training.
    4. Almost every aspect of training will have an accompanying ache or pain. This is to be expected but if you're concerned about anything, ask your coach.

    Don't turn up with any gear, you don't even know if you're going to like it. They'll have **** you can use for a while.

    Once you've decided you like it, you'll need hand wraps and gloves as an absolute minimum. Then, when you decide to spar, you'll need a cup, gumshield and shin pads.

    Let us know how it goes.
    " The reason elite level MMAists don't fight with aikido is the same reason elite level swimmers don't swim with their lips." - Virus

    " I shocked him with my skills on the ice becuase Wing Chun is great for hockey fighting." - 'Sifu' Milt Wallace

    "Besides, as you might already know (from Virus, for example) - there's only 1 wing chun and it sucks big time" - Tonuzaba

    "Even when I'm promising mayhem and butt-chicanery, I'm generally posting with a smile on my face." - Sochin101

    "That said, if he blocked my hip on a drop nage, I would extend my leg into a drop tai Otoshi and slam him so hard his parents would die." - MTripp

  3. WhiteShark is offline
    WhiteShark's Avatar

    1% Shark is better than you.

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Atlanta GA
    Posts
    9,179

    Posted On:
    4/13/2008 5:46pm

    supporting memberforum leaderstaff
     Style: BJJ/Shidokan

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Seriously just go to class.
  4. elbines is offline

    Featherweight

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Van Nuys, CA
    Posts
    64

    Posted On:
    4/13/2008 6:53pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Muay Thai (beginner)

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    wow. thanks for the guide you guys, I recently had posted a question on this without using the search function... my bad. It seems like cardio and tendon training are the order of the day while I save up money for mt class and equipment. In the meantime, would lifting weights also be of any benefit? I'm doing a general fitness class at my school in the meantime.
  5. Asriel is offline
    Asriel's Avatar

    I'd like to leave this world like I came into it: Screaming, naked & covered in someone else's blood

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Essex
    Posts
    3,795

    Posted On:
    4/14/2008 3:53am

    supporting member
     Style: Muay Thai (BJJ hiatus)

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Any general fitness/weight training will be of some benefit mate but as has been said:

    JUST GO TO CLASS

    No amount of preparation will stop your legs from fatiguing from all the kicks you're going to be doing. Only kicking will make you better at kicking.

    Go to class. If you're unfit, that'll soon change.
    " The reason elite level MMAists don't fight with aikido is the same reason elite level swimmers don't swim with their lips." - Virus

    " I shocked him with my skills on the ice becuase Wing Chun is great for hockey fighting." - 'Sifu' Milt Wallace

    "Besides, as you might already know (from Virus, for example) - there's only 1 wing chun and it sucks big time" - Tonuzaba

    "Even when I'm promising mayhem and butt-chicanery, I'm generally posting with a smile on my face." - Sochin101

    "That said, if he blocked my hip on a drop nage, I would extend my leg into a drop tai Otoshi and slam him so hard his parents would die." - MTripp

  6. Domite is offline
    Domite's Avatar

    blotter art.

    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Brooklyn, NYC
    Posts
    1,529

    Posted On:
    4/14/2008 8:43am


     Style: San Shou

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Wait what is LSD running? that sounds awesome.
  7. elbines is offline

    Featherweight

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Van Nuys, CA
    Posts
    64

    Posted On:
    4/14/2008 1:28pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Muay Thai (beginner)

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    its actually pretty damn boring depending on where you run. From what I understand LSD running stands for Long Slow Distance running. For example you you would jog 2-3 miles at like 4mph.
  8. h_sh_m is offline

    Registered Member

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    Jul 2006
    Location
    New York
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    339

    Posted On:
    4/17/2008 3:09am


     Style: Injured for 1+ years

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    The guide I wrote is the preliminary version, eventually i'll get around to making it a full article.

    If you get anything from it, it should be that *prior to attending a class* any type of resistance training/weight lifting is basically useless at facilitating your introduction to Muay Thai.

    Cardio training on your own is also of very limited use, because it's very hard to simulate the type of endurance you'll need in Muay Thai. Additionally it's pretty ridiculous considering that even the most out of shape individuals only need about 1 or maximum 2 weeks of classes (not even attending every day) before they are generally acclimated to the cardiovascular/endurance requirements of a muay thai class.

    Basically your first couple of days are gonna suck inevitably. Might as well just get them over with and get on with your training, rather than spend two weeks futilely trying to ensure they'll suck a little less.

    So really, the only possible thing you can do to prepare, would be to engage in exercise that will minimize the potential for injury. This is actually a very useful thing to do. However if you are careful about slowly ramping up your activity level in class and make sure to stretch really well, you may be able to get away without it.

    There are at least two CRITICAL additions I need to make to the guide:

    1) Always stretch & warm up before class: Do all the stretches. If you show up late to the group led stretch, do them on your own. NEVER participate without stretching, even if the coach pressures you to (which he shouldn't). This is #1 in injury prevention and MORE IMPORTANT THAN EVERYTHING ELSE I WROTE.

    2) Look to pair up with people who are your size and around your experience level. Larger people hit harder. They will **** you up in ways you didn't know were possible and you won't learn much. More experienced people also hit harder, however, sometimes it's good to take advantage of the opportunity to work with someone more experienced. Just make sure they aren't going too intensely for you.



    The Following is a Rant - Feel Free to Ignore:

    PS: Reading my suggestions and any article I post, you may think this is advice from a bitch. The reason I stress this **** so much is because I have noticed that there are 2 factors that determine progress in real martial arts more than anything else (natural athletic ability, time constraints, financial constraints, etc.). They are:

    1) Real effort/desire to learn
    2) Incidence of injury

    For every UFC fighter on TV, for every good fighter at your local gym, for every NAGA division champ, there are a whole bunch of "also trained" guys. The guys who tore a rotator cuff, damaged some tendons somewhere, fucked up their knees, got chronic turf toe, etc. and can only say that at some point they "also trained in that stuff."

    If you want to get a clue just start a thread on Bullshido asking people to describe what injuries they've gotten since they started.

    The worse part is no matter what you do, injuries will occur, and they will slow your progress. So it's not like you have much lee-way to **** around and get unneccessary ones. This'll grind everything to a halt.

    To give you an idea. I started training exclusively in Muay Thai about 4 months ago. I did everything wrong and noone told me otherwise. So far I have netted a total of about 1.5 months actually training and 2.5 months nursing injury. Do you have any idea how fucking enraging that is? (In fairness, some of those injuries were old ones from other things that flared up again)

    Interestingly enough, there are a decent amount of academic journal articles and resources written by professional trainers who work with martial artists document the importance of this issue. However, it's probably the most under-addressed aspect of training in most schools.

    So to recap. Be safe, ramp up, then once acclimated add a general fitness program to your training.
  9. h_sh_m is offline

    Registered Member

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    Location
    New York
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    Posted On:
    4/17/2008 3:24am


     Style: Injured for 1+ years

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Asriel
    1. Turn up for class in shorts and a t-shirt.
    2. Listen to your instructor and do what he says.
    3. Do not **** about or talk when you're supposed to be training.
    otherwise no soup for you.

    Quote Originally Posted by Asriel
    4. Almost every aspect of training will have an accompanying ache or pain. This is to be expected but if you're concerned about anything, ask your coach.
    Later you'll get pretty good at telling what's a good pain and what's a bad one.

    Quote Originally Posted by Asriel
    Don't turn up with any gear, you don't even know if you're going to like it. They'll have **** you can use for a while.
    Most MMA places that also teach MT are cool like that. The few pure MT places that I've been to are pretty insistent you have your own **** from the start. But yeah, doesn't hurt to call ahead and make sure.

    Quote Originally Posted by Asriel
    Once you've decided you like it, you'll need hand wraps and gloves as an absolute minimum. Then, when you decide to spar, you'll need a cup, gumshield and shin pads.
    Dude shin pads are a fucking minimum. I would strongly suggest you get the cup from the start too. I kicked someone in the nuts accidentally last week. I'll be damned if it ain't get good to me. I intend on doing it again next week. You may unkowingly be attending my gym.

    No seriously though, that stuff happens frequently, even before sparring. Most often during clinch work and push kick drills. More importantly though, I feel like wearing a cup during training has a very positive psychological benefit, allowing you to really commit to a movement.
  10. Zyph is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    145

    Posted On:
    4/18/2008 3:56pm


     Style: Muay Thai

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I wanted to add to this a bit more. All that is posted here is awesome advice, and much of it is stuff I tell new students.

    What I wanted to add was on the LDS running. When I was training hard, my coach always made us mix sprints in. Said it would help us with burst endurance and and generaly make us quicker. I just did it because he told me too. I later read books that also added to this theory. And just took it for granted.

    Well, my son started wrestling this year ( he is 11, had a late start). He went from one program with the rec that was intense, lots and lots of running with sprints mixed in heavily. The kid became fast, really fast and explosive on the mat. Then he went to an off season program where they are not a tough on the kids. Running, but no sprints, really very little cardio. I have seen his speed and burst endurance decreas in this time. So I guess the proof is in the pudding as they say.

    Take it or leave it, if you are going to run, mix in sprints.
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