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  1. #11
    Phoenix's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by 7thSamurai
    I can't answer that question. I'm sorry. I'm still learning the ballistics data.

    http://www.handloads.org/loaddata/de...=Powder&Source
    No, that's cool.

    Only reason I was curious is because I would have figured this round have a pretty high ballistic coefficient because of it's size.

    Wondering if it'd be better than the .50 AE, in terms of range and accuracy.
    "Onward we stagger, and if the tanks come, may God help the tanks." - Col. William O. Darby

  2. #12
    King Sleepless's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Damn it. My awesome joke reply got canceled. Damn you NBC. DAMN YOU FOR HATING LOVE AND AMERICA.

    Anyway, I love that gun. It's secretly my favorite super hero.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Phoenix
    Any idea what the bullet drop is at that range?
    Well bullet drop is independent of horizontal velocity as drop is influenced purely by gravity. So to calculate bullet drop at a specific range (assuming you're firing perfectly horizontal), you just need to know the bullet's speed, calculate time to that distance, then determine how far that bullet would fall in a straight drop in that time using the constant acceleration rate for gravity (which I don't know off the top of my head).

  4. #14
    7thSamurai's Avatar
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    Can you explain that using a common round?

  5. #15

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    So for simplicity sakes, say you're firing a gun perfectly horizontal. Let's have bullet velocity at 3000 fps, and you want to calculate bullet drop for a target 3000 feet away. So it will reach the target in 1 second. Standard gravity (i looked it up) is 32.1740 ft/sē. So in one second, the bullet'll drop 32 feet. Kind of a bitch for aiming eh?

    With the average person being about 6 feet high, that means shooting perfectly horizontal with a bullet that can go 3000 fps (slightly faster than an M-16) that bullet can only go about 560 feet before it hits the ground in about 0.18 seconds.

    Keep in mind, this is super super super oversimplified, because while drop is affected purely by gravity, horizontal velocity is affected by EVERY FREAKIN THING POSSIBLE. Like wind resistance, bullet aerodynamics, bullet composition, humidity, temperature, etc. etc. etc. Because that bullet velocity is constantly varied at a reducing rate, that's where the complex math comes into calculating bullet drop.

    But for a simple base calculation, plug in average bullet velocity to distance to figure out time, then plug in time to gravity to figure out drop distance.

  6. #16
    7thSamurai's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I think a more in depth discussion of this would make an excellent thread. This is something I've been trying to learn recently. I'm trying to step up my shooting and get involved in some competitive matches and I'm certain that this would greatly increase my knowledge of shooting.

  7. #17

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    "Broke the scope after 10 shots" That is some power there. I would bet a box of shells will break the wallet as well. Sure looks fun for the range though.

  8. #18
    7thSamurai's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    It's definitely not like grabbing a 100 rd box of .22 to go plinking with.

  9. #19

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    I have a vague memory of seeing an .80 caliber handgun before in some magazine, but I don't remember who made it. Does anybody know?

  10. #20
    che_70b's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bitparity View Post
    So for simplicity sakes, say you're firing a gun perfectly horizontal. Let's have bullet velocity at 3000 fps, and you want to calculate bullet drop for a target 3000 feet away. So it will reach the target in 1 second. Standard gravity (i looked it up) is 32.1740 ft/sē. So in one second, the bullet'll drop 32 feet. Kind of a bitch for aiming eh?

    With the average person being about 6 feet high, that means shooting perfectly horizontal with a bullet that can go 3000 fps (slightly faster than an M-16) that bullet can only go about 560 feet before it hits the ground in about 0.18 seconds.

    Keep in mind, this is super super super oversimplified, because while drop is affected purely by gravity, horizontal velocity is affected by EVERY FREAKIN THING POSSIBLE. Like wind resistance, bullet aerodynamics, bullet composition, humidity, temperature, etc. etc. etc. Because that bullet velocity is constantly varied at a reducing rate, that's where the complex math comes into calculating bullet drop.

    But for a simple base calculation, plug in average bullet velocity to distance to figure out time, then plug in time to gravity to figure out drop distance.
    I dont think your numbers are right on this. The drop on target at that distance with a 5.56 is closer to three inches than six feet (assuming you are shooting at a target that is about 6 feet high from your description). I am also assuming a 100 yard zero on the rifle in this case. I tend to zero at 25 yards (much easier to check my point of impact than starting long) and then double check the zero at longer ranges. a 25 yard zero will put you 3 inches high at 100 yards, dead on 200, and 3 low at 300 with things continuing to drop off from there. Keep in mind that this is with a relatively flat shooting centerfire rifle. The part you forgot about was the ballistic arc. Bullets do not travel in a straight line from the muzzle, they first raise up and then start to drop down.

    This same principal applies to a handgun but hand have a steeper ballistic arc than a rifle (gets higher faster and drops quicker).
    Hope this info is helpfull.

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