Thread: static workouts

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    static workouts

    Well I never tried static lifting before.But yesterday my friend told me how useful it is.

    So I tried doing it with pushups and some biceps moves with dumbells.

    The thing I do is (sorry for crappy english) for example if I do push ups I dont push myself completely upwards but also not at downwards,resting, just middle of it.
    And wait in that position as much as I can.

    I saw it works your muscles alot.

    Can anyone tell me about what advantages or disadvantages static workouts have?
    And could it be used as a workout routine? Do any of you do it in your workouts?
    (And I wonder what its real english translation too lol)

    Thanks from now on

  2. #2

    Join Date
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Well, there's doing things (such as pushups and chinups) at speed.

    There are the ultraslows (use a clock to time anything from ten seconds to a couple of minutes from full flexion to full extension and back again)--extra weight on the back optional.

    And there are the statics: start at full extension, lower to 1/4--wait ten seconds to a couple of minutes there--then 1/2-way (same waiting time) then 3/4 (ditto) and then at near-flexion (once again). Then reverse the process.

    The main benefits of statics and ultraslows involve anaerobic endurance (or just plain getting used to continuing with heightened amounts of lactic-buildup in the muscles being worked). Might be good to keep from gassing-out too soon in situations such as defending an armbar attempt. If you're more mentally used to keeping on--regardless of lactic-induced discomfort-- than your partner is, you might outlast him in that situation, and have more left over to reverse things.

  3. #3

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Thanks for your answer.

    and will it be good for shape too?Can you keep yourself fit and your muscles definite with this kind of training?

  4. #4

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Depends on what you consider to be "good shape".

    For grapplers, the stereotypic optimum is to be squat, low c. of g., that sort of thing. For a counterpuncher, many think being long-limbed and not too heavy is better. Not everyone, but many.

    I've used body-weight exercises and things like statics to maintain size and much of the muscular endurance and other types of strength I had when I was doing free-weight training in my high school and university days. (Was 248 lbs. back then, am 224 lbs. now). That, however, has to do with capability, not looks. Since I was a bouncer and then a correctional officer--and already married, so I didn't have to impress the girls--looking "ripped" really wasn't the goal.

    Usually, looking "ripped" means isolation-lifting at light-to-medium loads, high reps and some cardio for most of the week, while doing pyramids (but never overmaxing at the apex-rep) two or three times a week.

    Again, it all depends on what you call "good shape"--and there are many opinions on how to get there. I've never been a bodybuilder, so for the "looks" part, that's the type of person you might want to ask.
    Last edited by Vieux Normand; 3/13/2008 8:50am at .

  5. #5

    Join Date
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Isometric holds are a useful sort of movement, to strengthen weak spots, occlude blood flow, that kind of thing. They can also be really good for measuring linear progress, like with those expensive machines Sisco sells. I don't really think they're totally the best though, learning to move eccentrically and concentrically is important both for absorbing and creating power as well as for developing flexibility.

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