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  1. WhiteShark is offline
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    1% Shark is better than you.

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    Posted On:
    3/22/2008 4:15pm

    supporting memberforum leaderstaff
     Style: BJJ/Shidokan

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by maofas
    If your muscles are loose and flexible, your kick will be faster and require less effort to lift. Stiffness in the muscles creates additional inertia.

    The only good argument, that I see, against increasing your flexibility is that time is limited and you'd prefer to spend that time working on something else.
    What you're saying sounds like it makes sense. BUT if you are trying to increase your flexibility to kick higher and the real reason you can't kick high is because of form then all you're doing is masking your poor form. Form first THEN flexibility IMO.
  2. maofas is offline
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    Posted On:
    3/22/2008 9:23pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Kenkojuku Karate, Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Agree 100% with that.
  3. stonekoh is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/23/2008 12:05am

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Muay Thai

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by WhiteShark
    stonekoh, you should really consider your form. That is why Omega mentioned getting video of you kick including footwork. For example, I can't do a split but I can kick the head even when I'm not warmed up.
    ok been trying to get a vid, will get it soon! when i keep high like head kicks, i find that i have to lean back alot to get my leg high.

    its also very very difficult for me when i kick pads held by a tall padholder, especially if i wanna kick them fast n repeatedly, cos i ll be awkwardly stretched while executing the first kick, n need to reset n readjust before i can throw the next kick.

    haha sorry if this is hard to understand n doesnt make sense i ll get the vid in asap.
  4. stonekoh is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/23/2008 12:21am

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Muay Thai

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by thaiboxersp
    hey there,

    # 1) the fact that your even competing is awesome. in my opinion actual competition is a good way to judge ones growth in muay thai (as stated, just my opinion).

    but in all honesty if i were you (which im not) i would not go through with the next match until you have worked a little more. i say this because i have taken fights on short notice and when your not properly prepared mentally or physically it can really have an effect on fighting. keep in mind that if you plan to take your fighting somewhere you need to bust your hump as much as possible. youll see that thai fighters train hard year round and continuosly so thatb if a short notice fight happens, they will be ready. i would recomend doing the same. and dont forget its ok to have a day off to heal as well.

    as far as training, you need good coaches to help you. im am in no way saying leave your current coach, but look for help elsewhere also, you need good quality people to help yopu push through what can sometimes be a rigorous training regimine. having these people will help you get through workouts and alot more.

    as stated just my opinion. but i think the fact you fought to test yourself is awesome
    thanks dude, rly encouraging. i wouldnt say my next fight is very short notice, the most recent one was pretty short notice though, its just that theyre pretty near n doesnt give me alot of time to work on the mistakes.

    i agree with trying to find quality pple to help me out, been trying to do that, but without much success (except for everyone in this forum who've given me so much gd advice). . . i ve realised i have to be very independent n proactive with my own training, which i was not previously used to, coming from a competitive soccer background. but then again, i guess getting in the ring will be more satisfying becos of this.

    i'm just about to go for stairs running n sprints now! today is sunday(my fights next sunday) so i m following khun kao's advice of making the workout today the most hardcore. wish me luck lol!
  5. Randomxman is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/24/2008 8:38am

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Free Style Striking

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by WhiteShark
    This is crap. Tons of great Muay Thai fighters never lift weights. Muay Thai gets you in the best shape for Muay Thai. If you have a soccer background I'm sure your cario is there and you know how to run. You probably just need to spar longer rounds so your body acclimates to Muay Thai. A good example is if you fight 3 x 3 minute rounds train 4 x 4 minute rounds.
    The only problem with that style of training is that itís not sport specific.

    If the kid's fight is 2 or 3 Minute Rounds, than he needs to be training his rounds the same time length so he paces himself correctly for the fight. It is good to mix it up once and a while but I wouldn't make it a habit. If he is training 4 minute rounds he is going to be pacing himself for 4 minute rounds.

    You of all people know that you fight the way you train.
  6. WhiteShark is offline
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    1% Shark is better than you.

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    Posted On:
    3/24/2008 1:05pm

    supporting memberforum leaderstaff
     Style: BJJ/Shidokan

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I'm talking about building up a base of Muay Thai fitness. Everyone in the world trains for longer than they fight. Another way to do it is to rest less between rounds than you will in your actual fight. If they didn't do stuff like that they would fall over dead in the occasional overtime rounds or when they have to face someone that pushes the pace.

    If you want to hone your time awareness sure cut down to the exact time you are going to fight when it gets closer to your event. You should still train more than 3 rounds for a 3 round fight.


    In general everyone seems to take the "You train how you fight" mentality WAY too seriously. That whole phrase applied to **** like stop action point sparring and kata. NOT some mysterious fear of training longer than your actual fight rounds.
  7. Randomxman is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/24/2008 2:39pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Free Style Striking

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by WhiteShark
    I'm talking about building up a base of Muay Thai fitness. Everyone in the world trains for longer than they fight. Another way to do it is to rest less between rounds than you will in your actual fight. If they didn't do stuff like that they would fall over dead in the occasional overtime rounds or when they have to face someone that pushes the pace.

    If you want to hone your time awareness sure cut down to the exact time you are going to fight when it gets closer to your event. You should still train more than 3 rounds for a 3 round fight.


    In general everyone seems to take the "You train how you fight" mentality WAY too seriously. That whole phrase applied to **** like stop action point sparring and kata. NOT some mysterious fear of training longer than your actual fight rounds.

    It does have its place - In some gyms in Thailand they will even do a 25 min session w/ out breaks on the pads. And shortening the rest length to increase endurance is different than training for a non-existent four minute rounds. At first glance you would think that its better but in the end you are subconsciously pacing yourself for a 4 minute round.

    Of course you should train more than 3 rounds for a 3 round fight - I am not disagreeing with increasing the AMOUNT of the rounds. I'm speaking of the time of the rounds the pace of 1.5 Minute Round (SPORT TKD), 2 Minute Round (AM Boxing/Kickboxing), 3 Minute Round (Boxing/KB), and a 5 Minute Round (MMA) - will all be diff. Look at the pro's you donít see any boxers training 5 minute rounds for a 3 Minute round fight. But Randy Couture does AND thatís because he is fighting a 5 minute paced round. I understand the logic of training 6x3 Minute Rounds for a 3 minute round fight, that I will agree with you on. But you still need to keep your rounds in the general ball park.

    If I told you to train 2 minute rounds instead you would tell me no, and why its because your fight is a 3 minute round. Now why would you train a 4 minute round. Isnít there more effective ways to get into fighting shape and condition.

    I'm pretty sure that the phrase applies to more than point sparring and kata - It can be applied to any sport not just the various arts of combat.
  8. WhiteShark is offline
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    1% Shark is better than you.

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    Posted On:
    3/24/2008 3:28pm

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     Style: BJJ/Shidokan

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    You are still taking this too seriously. If you as an AMATEUR fighter can tell me with 100% certainty how long each round of your next fight is you need to fight more. I've had to fight 2, 3, 4 and 5 minute rounds before just so I can get an opponent. And you're wrong as long as you don't recommend only training for 2 rounds I'd find nothing wrong with training 2 minute rounds. I've done as short as 1 minute before to practice going all out. I regularly do 2 minute rolls in BJJ. We call them blast rounds you roll hard for 2 minutes then switch partners with minimal rest and do it some more.

    Adjusting the length of your rounds for different training goals has a place in EVERY fighter's program. During your run up to your fight you may want to work exclusively in the time you will be fighting but that is for round awareness.
  9. MastaChance is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/24/2008 3:31pm


     Style: Muay Thai/BJJ/Boxing/MMA

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by WhiteShark
    You are still taking this too seriously. If you as an AMATEUR fighter can tell me with 100% certainty how long each round of your next fight is you need to fight more. I've had to fight 2, 3, 4 and 5 minute rounds before just so I can get an opponent. And you're wrong as long as you don't recommend only training for 2 rounds I'd find nothing wrong with training 2 minute rounds. I've done as short as 1 minute before to practice going all out. I regularly do 2 minute rolls in BJJ. We call them blast rounds you roll hard for 2 minutes then switch partners with minimal rest and do it some more.

    Adjusting the length of your rounds for different training goals has a place in EVERY fighter's program. During your run up to your fight you may want to work exclusively in the time you will be fighting but that is for round awareness.
    You've fought before? When and what rules and style?
  10. WhiteShark is offline
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    1% Shark is better than you.

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    Posted On:
    3/24/2008 4:08pm

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     Style: BJJ/Shidokan

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Chance, turn on your PMs!

    Short answer:
    5 years ago i was an active amateur kickboxer. That is why I don't have the amateur fighter tag. I didn't think it was appropriate because I'm "retired" from kickboxing.
    Last edited by WhiteShark; 3/24/2008 4:13pm at .
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