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  1. Domite is offline
    Domite's Avatar

    blotter art.

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    Sep 2007
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    Posted On:
    3/18/2008 8:32am


     Style: San Shou

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by stonekoh
    thanks guys , i will take your advice very seriously.

    about the leg checks i did manage to catch quite a few of his leg kicks with my knee, so i knew that hurt him somewhat. but i got caught with a few inside leg kicks.

    but in the 2nd round when he threw that high kick that connected, i misjudged it n checked for a leg kick instead n got kicked in the head.

    i have this problem i cant seem to judge whether the kicks r gonna be low / mid / high? n sometimes when the opponent teeps i end up thinking its a kick n checking.

    how should i work on this? drills?

    thanks once again everyone
    You arent supposed to know where the kicks are going, just block the whole side at once.
  2. ray jackson is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/18/2008 8:51am


     Style: karate, Ju-jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    ^^^I disagree Domite. If a boxer can react and see punches and combinations and then respond with movement and counters, one should sure as hell be able to block a kick most of the time. I would start by keeping my hands up.

    Stonekoh, using moderate contact, have a training partner essentially use you as a target for kicking. Try to block, check, and evade his kicks as best you can, and throw some counters here and there too. It will help you get used to seeing the techniques beeing thrown at you and you'll recognize the more subtle differences.
  3. Domite is offline
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    blotter art.

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    Posted On:
    3/18/2008 10:35am


     Style: San Shou

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by ray jackson
    ^^^I disagree Domite. If a boxer can react and see punches and combinations and then respond with movement and counters, one should sure as hell be able to block a kick most of the time. I would start by keeping my hands up.
    In so many words, thats what I meant. You dont either block your head or your ribs, you block your head and ribs.
  4. stonekoh is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/18/2008 11:56am

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Muay Thai

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by ray jackson
    ^^^I disagree Domite. If a boxer can react and see punches and combinations and then respond with movement and counters, one should sure as hell be able to block a kick most of the time. I would start by keeping my hands up.

    Stonekoh, using moderate contact, have a training partner essentially use you as a target for kicking. Try to block, check, and evade his kicks as best you can, and throw some counters here and there too. It will help you get used to seeing the techniques beeing thrown at you and you'll recognize the more subtle differences.
    i tried to do that today, got my friend and we took turns to throw kicks or teeps at each other n practise evading/checking n countering. will keep working on it, apart from this drill what else is good? =) thanks
  5. stonekoh is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/18/2008 11:58am

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Muay Thai

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Khun Kao
    Wind Sprints: I recommend going to a playing field, such as a soccer field, and running as fast as you can from one end to the other. Once you complete 1 length of the field, turn around and jog back as you catch your breath and get your heartrate back down. Once you get back to your starting point, IMMEDIATELY turn around and sprint the field again. Keep repeating this until you simply can't do any more sprints.

    Stairs: Find as long a flight of stairs as you can to run up and down. From personal experience, I used to run the stairs at a local Masonic Temple. There were 144 stairs in total, but what made it even more difficult was the fact that there were about 10 stairs, then a long straight-away, then another 10 stairs, another long straight away... etc. The last 40+ stairs went straight to the top. It's a real bitch of a run. I would run up and down that a minimum of 3x's, twice per week. Sometimes I'd get more days or repetitions in. We also have the world famous "Exorcist Stairs" nearby. That is another LOOOOOOOOONG flight of stairs that we will try to take our fighters to and make them run them once a week. Up & down once is not enough. Multiple repetitions, stopping between repetitions to do calisthenic and plyometric drills, etc.....
    oh okok i understand! i plan to go to the track n run similarly to what u mentioned, jog 100 m, sprint 100 m, jog 100m sprint 100m etc. . . my gym is also on the 4th floor so i can use the steps that go up.

    my fight is in 11 days , 30th march. how close to the fight should i stop doing these n rest?
  6. Khun Kao is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/19/2008 7:58am


     Style: MuayThai

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Give yourself about 2 days of active rest. What I mean by an active rest is that while you stop your hardcore training and conditioning, you don't stop training. You do a few exercises to "keep the motor running". Go for a light, 10-min jog. Do a few rounds of shadowboxing focusing on just being smooth, do some light calisthenics....

    Ideally, what you want to do when you train is determine the day of the week your fight will be on. So hypothetically, if you're fighting on a Friday night, your Friday night training sessions are your most hardcore training sessions. I'd recommend making the day before your day of relaxation. So again, assuming you fight on a Friday night, Thursday would be your day off of training, and Friday would be your hardcore training session each week. It helps you create a rhythm so you're at your peakl when you fight.
  7. maofas is offline
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    Posted On:
    3/19/2008 11:41am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Kenkojuku Karate, Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Replying specifically to your flexibility woes:

    Don't stretch in the morning. I'm not saying it didn't work for the guy who is suggesting that, but that's not ideal and the older you get, the more chance you're going to pull something (which will force you to stop stretching till it heals, so you'll wind up losing flexibility).

    Light stretching before a workout to prevent pulls is one thing, but stretching to increase flexibility is something entirely different. You have to push yourself and test your limits, and to be able to do so safely, your muscles need to be warmed up.

    At the very least, break a sweat first. Ideally, do your heavy stretching after your cardio or at the end of class when you're hot and super-sweaty. You'll be able to go down further and the risk of hurting yourself is decreased. Start slow, but you have to push your stretches to the point where you're extremely uncomfortable, but stop right before you feel true pain.

    If all you care about, flexibility-wise, is getting your front and round kicks higher/easier to lift, then you can narrow your stretches down to 3-4, but variety is nice, especially if you have someone available to do partnered stretches with. I don't want to write a novel about stretching and put you/everyone to sleep, and Omega already offered to help, so I'll leave it at that for that for now.

    For the record, I went from being incredibly unflexible to having full front and side splits. YMMV, but if you treat stretching like you treat your cardio, pads, etc. then you will see a night and day improvement in 6 months.
  8. stonekoh is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/19/2008 4:03pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Muay Thai

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by maofas

    If all you care about, flexibility-wise, is getting your front and round kicks higher/easier to lift, then you can narrow your stretches down to 3-4, but variety is nice, especially if you have someone available to do partnered stretches with.
    thanks very much! i am aiming primarily to get my front n round kicks higher, can u recommend me the few good stretches that i should concentrate on? i will make it a point to do stretching after every workout. =)

    p.s. i feel especially tight at the hip joint where the thigh bone connects. when i lift/swing my leg up sideways with feet pointed forwards i can only get it up at most waist height.
  9. stonekoh is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/19/2008 4:08pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Muay Thai

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Khun Kao
    Give yourself about 2 days of active rest. What I mean by an active rest is that while you stop your hardcore training and conditioning, you don't stop training. You do a few exercises to "keep the motor running". Go for a light, 10-min jog. Do a few rounds of shadowboxing focusing on just being smooth, do some light calisthenics....

    Ideally, what you want to do when you train is determine the day of the week your fight will be on. So hypothetically, if you're fighting on a Friday night, your Friday night training sessions are your most hardcore training sessions. I'd recommend making the day before your day of relaxation. So again, assuming you fight on a Friday night, Thursday would be your day off of training, and Friday would be your hardcore training session each week. It helps you create a rhythm so you're at your peakl when you fight.
    wow this sounds like a rly good plan. =) thanks khun kao! too bad i only have a week b4 my fight. my fights on a sunday, when the gyms closed, but i ll be sure to heed your advice and get some hard cardio in!
  10. Khun Kao is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/20/2008 10:33am


     Style: MuayThai

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    That sucks that the gym is closed on Sundays, which seem to be the days you fight, because your hardcore training on that day each week should include hard bag drills, hard pad drills, sparring, and some hardcore cardio.

    I used always fight on Saturdays. Saturday would start off with me running the stairs at the Masonic Temple (mentioned earlier in the thread). I'd typically run 3 - 6 times up and down. I'd start off using each stair the first time up, then skip a stair the 2nd time up, then skip 2 stairs the 3rd time up. Then I'd do the same in descending order.

    I'd then go eat lunch and go do some weight training at the gym, then head out to the MT gym in the mid-afternoon for about 2 hours of hard bag and pad training. The sparring was actually light in intensity, focusing on speed, timing, etc....
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