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  1. variance is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/10/2008 6:37pm


     Style: EF UM A

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Kunio Miyake: shito-ryu kenpo aikijutsu

    Alright. I have an acquaintence who is neck deep in the "d34dly"
    and how MMA is Pride/UFC LARPing.

    He claims his teacher has fought yakuza to for his blackbelt and all those other wonderful typical bullshidoka-esque stories.

    The website he points out to me has your standard fare aiki-crap demos.
    http://www.miyake-shukokai.com/

    I can't seem to find anything in the way of legitimate stuff regarding this individual. hoping those of you with the elite JMA degrees can help me out on this one.

    So far all I get is some olympic pictures (point sparring FTW?)
    JKF and WKF pictures from the gallery.




    Videos here:
    http://www.miyake-shukokai.com/Videos.htm

    This knife defense video looks HORRIBLE:
    http://www.miyake-shukokai.com/video/KnifeDemo.wmv

    Demo video (nothing out of the ordinary)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_lCZXBFN7j8


    Training Methods are pretty much kata, form, punching air and two-man drills cuz they aren't "adept" enough to be sparring yet.

    All attempts I've made including pointing out SBGi's articles on alive training and sport vs street fails to convince this stubborn individual.

    all video searches for shito-ryu I can find come up with mandancing kata videos or really bad fight choreography montages.

    Here's the typical generic argument he spits out:
    Quote Originally Posted by Someone who hasn't trained alive
    "Sport fighting is the closest you can get to a real fight, ergo the best way to train for and be ready for one without rules."

    that's BS. sport fighting has rules. that's like saying "school is the best way to be prepared for a world without rules"

    mma is pride/ufc larping because you're all just imitating all the pride/ufc fighters you see on tv. you all don't train as intense as they do. it's "live", but how realistic is it when you end up in the fagget position, i mean, half-guard, for the whole fight, with no one interfering, and just watching you. pride/ufc are sport fighters, with arts made for sport fighting, for the arena, not real world multi-opponent self-defense.

    do me a favor. i'm just as paranoid of being ripped off by bullshidoka as you, so do some research on my sensei. kunio miyake. google him, post him on bullshido, see what people say. i know he has an international organization, and that he's the president, but you never know in this day and age. he speaks japanese, is japanese, and his classes aren't cheap. so check him out and tell me what you find.

    i have a co-worker who's a black belt in aikido. randori is not some compliant line drill. their goal is to jump your ass. seagal makes it look easy, but check out what happens when someone inexperienced does it. its a fucking disaster.

    as to why the real japanese aikido masters don't sport fight. probably cause they see pride/ufc as a joke. i dunno. ask bullshido. they seem to know everything.

    bullshido can't claim all traditional martial arts are larping. MMA owes too much of its heritage to the traditional martial arts. even the term: mixed MARTIAL ARTS. only difference is, one is mixed, one is traditional. some people like this japanese fusion ****, some people like traditional japanese. it depends on your taste.

    go out and pick a fight with some street thugs, see how far your sparring training has taken you. that's what my sensei did when testing for black belt and beyond. and he's traditional.

    1000+ years of traditional martial arts is pretty good evidence that this **** works. mma has only been around for a short time, is most likely a fad, and has yet to withstand the test of time.

    post my sensei on bullshido. see what kind of replies you get. i wanna know the truth. i don't like wasting my money either.
    Last edited by variance; 3/10/2008 6:47pm at .
      #1
  2. illegalusername is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/11/2008 5:20am


     Style: MMA + Harmonica

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    1000+ years of traditional martial arts is pretty good evidence that this **** works. mma has only been around for a short time, is most likely a fad, and has yet to withstand the test of time.
    "My ass has been an ass for over 20 years, but i still don't have to listen to what it says."
      #2
  3. Matt_C is offline

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    Posted On:
    10/17/2008 8:39pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Hello to you all.

    My name is Matthew and I would like to introduce myself. I came across this forum while browsing through google and thought I might add a little to this thread. It looks to be a little older so I don't know if it is still active but it never hurts to try.

    Kunio Miyake is actually widely known in the Japanese Martial Arts fields. He is in my estimation one of the most authentic and proficient teachers I have found.

    Bear in mind that I was a pupil of his so there is bound to be at least a level of bias out there. However, the very fact that I chose him to study under might speak in his favor. Not because I am a exceptionally capable individual but I have had the chance to work with world class athletes before in the field of Wrestling. (trained under Olympian John Azevedo where my team as a whole was ranked 4th in the nation and spent brief time with Dan Gable, Kenny Monday, spent time in the European Club system etc. Trained and knew several World Kenpo champions. Again, I was never a star but I spent enough time training around them that I feel at least capable of recognizing good training programs. Not to mention I grew up in Huntington Beach around the first few generations of UFC, many of whom wrestled at early ages with me and the others fought in the parking lots of many bars and clubs I would at the time frequent.

    I understand the spirit of this thread. When I quit Wrestling and was looking for another athletic pursuit I began looking for a Martial Arts teacher. To my dismay I found that 95% of teachers (in an area that has many "good" dojos) were comprised of either characatures of post-pubescent bumpkins that mail order their certificates from Mom's basement they call the "Control Center" or over muscled line backers who want to bully everyone that smiles at them because they are still mad that high school is over and Seven Eleven now enforces the no loitering laws in their parking lot.

    FOR ME, Kunio Miyake's school was a rare find. He is as proficient and technical as any Olympian I have seen.

    A bit of background first:
    He is Japan born. He was an English professor in Japan. He spent the vast majority of his life in Martial Arts. If you speak with any Karate Man they do not realize he was a Jujitsu Man. If you speak to any Jujitsu man they do not realize he was a Karate Man. This is because it is very rare that someone can rise to such a high proficiency in both arts. It is like a really adept Lawyer becoming a very skilled Doctor. He rose very high in the ranks of Shorinji Kempo and was one of the highest level pupils of Doshin So when he passed away but for personal reasons left the association in a very honorable fashion and started a new school over here in America. Where he has trained some very fine pupils and raised a family.

    Here is a break down on his art:
    It is in a way a mix of Karate and traditional Japanese Jujitsu. This system is what the Tokyo police department use and is very similar to the scars system our US special forces use. I mention this as I have two close acquaintances that are ex Navy Seals and point this out. The entire system is based on being the most practical form of martial Arts with the point being to maim or kill your opponent as quickly as possible in order that you can move on to the next. It derives directly from what the Samurai of old would use if they lost their sword and horse in battle.

    Karate: His Karate is very boxing like. In my experience it is how boxing would be if it were bare knuckle. There will be fewer punches thrown and you are always attacking weak spots of the body. There is kata in the classes that focus solely on Karate but the Jujitsu classes focus primarily on repetition drills ending with live sparring. I notice that the original poster sounds a bit down on kata. I never did much of this myself (I would like to do more) but repetition drilling and kata re staples of ANY good athlete/fighter. The armed services use it; Olympians spend their life doing them. The best way to learn a complex movement is to repeat it very slowly with as many diverse partners as possible and slowly speed it up until you can do it flawlessly at full speed and on the spur of the moment (well that is the goal anyway). If you have ever seen a professional boxer train when not in front of the camera you will notice that often they are moving very slow or barely connecting with the bag...distance and timing.

    Jujitsu: The term martial arts literally mean that it is used on the battle field, anything else, while a noble pursuit is just sport. This is why they created Judo from Jujitsu. I am sure everyone here knows this but it is worth remembering. Jujitsu frankly is too dangerous to use in competition. They used to do that in Japan and the participants did not always survive. You have to eliminate the more dangerous techniques. For instance you could never allow small joint manipulation (e.g. wrist locks) in tournaments today as it would simply be too dangerous even though it is one of the more highly effective techniques to use in real combat. I would never trust someone I did not train with regularly to use the more effective techniques on me in live sparring.

    Why Kunio Miyake's training is so valuable?
    In my limited experience (only 33 years old) there are three categories of technique that a good martial artist needs.
    1. Outside: boxing, i.e. hitting your opponent from a distance that precludes him from being able to do anything but hit you at that same distance.
    2. Mid Range: using a technique on your opponent while still standing but close enough to grab if you wanted to that can check mate your opponent.
    3. ground fighting: In the event that you are unable to remain standing you can finish your opponent.

    I think all fighters given the option would rather eliminate their opponent but keep their standing position in order to address the next immediate threat. Kunio Miyake's teaching specializes in this area.

    Where it came from:
    So Doshin was a Japanese spy of sorts during the 2nd world war. After the war was over he returned to Japan only to find that the moral fiber had ripped. He used his techniques, which he claimed to have learned from the Shaolin monks. His art was named Shorinji Kempo (not kenpo) as Shorinji is the Japanese word for Shaolin in mixture with traditional Japanese Jujitsu to help his fellow countrymen regain their honor. He is I believe considered a folk hero of sorts in Japan. Their is even a movie where Sony Chiba stars as Doshin So called Killing Machine. The movie is worse than the title by the way and the techniques are not well don’t in my humble opinion. But it is kind of funny and a nice story. Kunio Miyake out of ( I presume respect to distinctify his school and the fact that it is the culmination of his knowledge) calls his art "Kempo Aiki-Jujitsu". Sensei Miyake’s school is no frills and less marketing. Instead his skill speaks for itself I am sure to the detriment of his notoriety.

    Well, this is a long answer to a short question. In my opinion though the martial arts field is rife with charlatans but Kunio Miyake is the real thing. I urge the original poster to not let what sounds like a bad experience with your friend sully the reputation of a really gifted teacher.

    I leave you with three thoughts.

    1. So Doshin was notorious for conducting his black belt tests in Yakuza bars. This is widely known and accepted. The Yakuza bosses thought it was a good test for their men as well.

    2. Dan Gable's students told me that it took him about two hours to warm up for a practice where he would actually participate but once warm he would wrestle a number of his more talented team members and win each match to show that he still could. In the same way on my best day I was not able to defeat the 50+ year old Sensei Miyake.

    3. Karate was all the rage in the sixties, Kung-Fu seen as the ultimate authority in the Seventies, Kenpo a bit later. We have our own flavor of the month now but in the end the really effective techniques are very similar.

    Cheers, Matt
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  4. DerAuslander is offline
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    Posted On:
    10/17/2008 9:46pm

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     Style: BJJ/C-JKD/KAAALIII!!!!!!!

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    First off, MODS please move this out of MABS. Miyaki is not a Bullshidoka. It belongs in the JMA forum.

    I leave other posters to address the arguments made in this thread.
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  5. Gezere is offline
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    Posted On:
    10/17/2008 11:58pm

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Matt_C
    Hello to you all.

    My name is Matthew and I would like to introduce myself. I came across this forum while browsing through google and thought I might add a little to this thread. It looks to be a little older so I don't know if it is still active but it never hurts to try.
    Hi Matt. Welcome and I hope you brought thick skin with you.

    Kunio Miyake is actually widely known in the Japanese Martial Arts fields. He is in my estimation one of the most authentic and proficient teachers I have found.
    You say he's widely known in JMA feilds but I don't think thats true. I think he is know in hi small slice of JMA but not in the the whole. Authenticity and Proficiency are two entirely different topics that can be evaluated separately.

    Bear in mind that I was a pupil of his so there is bound to be at least a level of bias out there.
    It is a good thing to admit this up front but that isn't going to really help in the scurtiny of this style.

    However, the very fact that I chose him to study under might speak in his favor.
    Actually it doesn't. No offense but the world is filled with guys who chose a teacher who is full of Bullshido so this doesn't mean much.

    Not because I am a exceptionally capable individual but I have had the chance to work with world class athletes before in the field of Wrestling. (trained under Olympian John Azevedo where my team as a whole was ranked 4th in the nation and spent brief time with Dan Gable, Kenny Monday, spent time in the European Club system etc.
    That's great! But I have a feeling you probably should have stuck to wrestling.
    Trained and knew several World Kenpo champions.
    So have I and I will withhold my opinion because I don't look favorably on the "ke_po" world.
    Again, I was never a star but I spent enough time training around them that I feel at least capable of recognizing good training programs.
    I would agree in the wrestling feild but how does that overlap into ke_po? Considering, by your own admittance, you are not a "star'?

    Not to mention I grew up in Huntington Beach around the first few generations of UFC, many of whom wrestled at early ages with me and the others fought in the parking lots of many bars and clubs I would at the time frequent.
    That doesn't mean much in this topic.

    FOR ME, Kunio Miyake's school was a rare find. He is as proficient and technical as any Olympian I have seen.
    Based on what? How has Miyake demonstrated that he is on par with an Olympic athelete?

    He is Japan born. He was an English professor in Japan.
    This doesn't mean much. I spent 9yrs in Japan and later went back to teach english to businessmen visiting the US when I was in college.
    He spent the vast majority of his life in Martial Arts.
    I officially started training in MA when I was 4 (my mom still has a picture of me in my gi then, no you won't see it because I also sport an enormous afro) I am now 34 and I have been training in MA ever since. Not all that training was worth anything. Quality of training beats time.
    If you speak with any Karate Man they do not realize he was a Jujitsu Man. If you speak to any Jujitsu man they do not realize he was a Karate Man. This is because it is very rare that someone can rise to such a high proficiency in both arts.
    Uh NO. This is BS. I can think of several friends I grew up with who where proficient in several arts and were KNOWN for that. This statement actually doesn't speak well of him. Hell in the last 9 years I have been recognized to be proficient in several arts (boxing, wrestling, BJJ, Jujutsu, BJJ, and MMA) and have been on national TV and even written about in books, but thats just me tooting my own horn. The point is that its not rare at all to find someone proficient in more than one art and to be recognized as such.
    It is like a really adept Lawyer becoming a very skilled Doctor.
    No its not. Law and Medicine are two very different fields. Karate and Jujutsu are not. They are actually two different aspects of the SAME feild. A more appropriate analogy is a lawyer who is proficient in both Criminal and Coporate law.

    He rose very high in the ranks of Shorinji Kempo and was one of the highest level pupils of Doshin So when he passed away but for personal reasons left the association in a very honorable fashion and started a new school over here in America. Where he has trained some very fine pupils and raised a family.
    Well its been a very long time since I've trained in Shorinji Kempo but I still know many old kenshi so I can ask about this but the point really doesn't mean much.


    It is in a way a mix of Karate and traditional Japanese Jujitsu.
    Shorinji Kempo isn't "karate" and which school for Jujutsu?

    This system is what the Tokyo police department use and is very similar to the scars system our US special forces use.
    I will have to ask about the Tokyo PD since I don't know what their OFFICIAL training is now but SCARS is NOT used by Special Forces. Before you argue with me look at my location and listen. SPECIAL FORCES is the term used for the US Army Green Berets. Civilians are looked at as idiots for using it for other things. SEALs, Force Recon, etc are Special Operations (SpecOps or SOF).

    I mention this as I have two close acquaintances that are ex Navy Seals and point this out.
    I have way more than two friends who are former and current SEALs they no longer do SCARs for a reason.

    The entire system is based on being the most practical form of martial Arts with the point being to maim or kill your opponent as quickly as possible in order that you can move on to the next. It derives directly from what the Samurai of old would use if they lost their sword and horse in battle.
    I say BULLSHIT! Why? Can you provide proof of this system being used to kill a person? If not please STFU. Seriously. As for the Samurai, I know a fair amount about koryu (old school ie before the Meiji era) MA and the only way that what you say is true is if this system can link it self to a koryu jujutsu ryuha. If not then this too is BS. Oh and FYI in Fuedal Japan the sword was a SECONDARY weapon on the battlefield. It was used if the warrior lost his primary weapon, generally a polearm, then after that they would use another weapon, like an sashito, to kill their opponent.

    Karate: His Karate is very boxing like.
    Then why not train boxing? As I said before Shorinji Kempo isn't "karate" so does he have other karate training?

    In my experience it is how boxing would be if it were bare knuckle. There will be fewer punches thrown and you are always attacking weak spots of the body.
    In case you didn't know, prior to the Queensbury rules boxing WAS bare knuckle. It actually quite easy know to understand what bare knuckle boxing was like.

    [/quote] There is kata in the classes that focus solely on Karate but the Jujitsu classes focus primarily on repetition drills ending with live sparring.[/quote]
    Good but does the kata training translate to actual fighting? If not then why?
    What I mean by this is that kata was used as a drill and the techniques were supposed to be used in fighting. If your fighting doesn't contain or resemble what you practiced in kata then it doesn't have much value.
    I notice that the original poster sounds a bit down on kata.
    For good reason as stated above.

    I never did much of this myself (I would like to do more) but repetition drilling and kata re staples of ANY good athlete/fighter The armed services use it; Olympians spend their life doing them.
    kata is a FORM of a drill but not all drills are "kata" in the TMA sense. Other than that I agree.

    The best way to learn a complex movement is to repeat it very slowly with as many diverse partners as possible and slowly speed it up until you can do it flawlessly at full speed and on the spur of the moment (well that is the goal anyway). If you have ever seen a professional boxer train when not in front of the camera you will notice that often they are moving very slow or barely connecting with the bag...distance and timing.
    Uh NO. There is a "crawl, walk, run" to training and the "crawl" part doesn't last long. I actually have worked with professional boxers (Ray Mercer for one who knocked me on my cocky teenage ass many moons ago, and others like Vernon Forest) I watched them train and I can say that they don' know work slow very often. They might go slow to warm up but after that its is as if they were in a match.

    Jujitsu: The term martial arts literally mean that it is used on the battle field, anything else, while a noble pursuit is just sport.
    WRONG! The term means a LARGE collection of techniques used for combat. Not all Jujutsu was used in the battlefield. Several schools, like Asayama Ichiden Ryu, were know for being the method of everyday pple.
    This is why they created Judo from Jujitsu.
    WRONG AGAIN! Kodokan Judo was formed a a method of physical culture (ie PE) for the school system.

    I am sure everyone here knows this but it is worth remembering.
    It seems you don't know this. So listen and learn. Jigoro Kano created Kodokan Judo to be taught in schools it was BUDO(as opposed to BUJUTSU) because it was it helped develop a person through rigorous training. The actual effectiveness of an art was secondary in BUDO. Example KENDO came from KENJUTSU but the methods of Kendo does not resemble the methods of Kenjutsu because the tool is different with its own dynamics. This is easily proven by looking at Kendo then any number of schools of Kenjutsu. They are not the same by far. Now Kano, who was adept in classical JJ, wanted to make sure his method could be continuously trained so in introduced RANDORI, which allowed the practitioners to work against fully resisting partners when applying techniques. This turned out to be a very good thing.

    Jujitsu frankly is too dangerous to use in competition. They used to do that in Japan and the participants did not always survive.
    BULLSHIT! JJ has ALWAYS been competitive. Tournaments were numerous and deaths, like in any other sport, were rare. It was not uncommon for a lord of an area to organize a tournament to pick a trainer. (This was actually done for several MA) even AFTER the Meiji era tournaments were known. Kano even organized competitions himself to test his method and he came out on top.
    You have to eliminate the more dangerous techniques. For instance you could never allow small joint manipulation (e.g. wrist locks) in tournaments today as it would simply be too dangerous even though it is one of the more highly effective techniques to use in real combat.
    WRONG!
    Wristlocks are actually allowed in some tournaments. Also several members here who have trained with me can atest that I have used wristlock when live rolling with them. Mica, a BJJ Black Belt, in Las Vegas is know for his. Now things like fingers are usually disallowed becuase 1) They are easy to break and no one needs that from a competition and b) broken fingers don't impact a fight as much as a broken arm does.
    I would never trust someone I did not train with regularly to use the more effective techniques on me in live sparring.
    You shouldn't trust anyone who isn't proficient to use them. I wouldn't trust a noob but a higher belt I wouldn't mind.

    Why Kunio Miyake's training is so valuable?
    Do tell

    In my limited experience (only 33 years old) there are three categories of technique that a good martial artist needs.
    Uh based on what? Not all MArtist need the same things. I always chuckle when pple say there master has trained police and "Special Forces" as a means on how "deadly" their art is because the skillset needed for them are very different. I am a Modern Army Combatives Instructor and I have actually trained MPs (Military Police) and elite soldiers, such as Rangers and Special Forces. My training for MPs and other soldiers are different. Where as I would teach "Buttstroke, gain distance, Fire" for CQB I can't teach that to an MP because his role is to subdue and arrest as opposed to eliminate the enemy.


    1. Outside: boxing, i.e. hitting your opponent from a distance that precludes him from being able to do anything but hit you at that same distance.
    2. Mid Range: using a technique on your opponent while still standing but close enough to grab if you wanted to that can check mate your opponent.
    3. ground fighting: In the event that you are unable to remain standing you can finish your opponent.
    I agree that person needs to be proficient in different rangers of combat but what they need depends on their role.

    I think all fighters given the option would rather eliminate their opponent but keep their standing position in order to address the next immediate threat. Kunio Miyake's teaching specializes in this area.
    Wrong. Again Police are TRAINED to take pple down for a reason. Its much easier to deal with them there than if they are mobile on their feet resisting arrest.

    Different pple might require different things. This whole "but the person down and remain standing" thing sounds nice but the reality is that whether you remain standing or not is not always up to you.

    So Doshin was a Japanese spy of sorts during the 2nd world war. After the war was over he returned to Japan only to find that the moral fiber had ripped. He used his techniques, which he claimed to have learned from the Shaolin monks. His art was named Shorinji Kempo (not kenpo) as Shorinji is the Japanese word for Shaolin in mixture with traditional Japanese Jujitsu to help his fellow countrymen regain their honor.
    Let me help you out sense you don't know. KEMPO or KENPO doesn't matter. They both mean the same thing. Romanization is the attempt to match letter combinations to the sounds of a foreign language. Ther are many methods to do this and they don't always agree. DAKAKA JUJUTSU ka JIU JITSU, KEMPO ka KENPO docira demo ii desu.

    He is I believe considered a folk hero of sorts in Japan.
    Not a "hero" but Shorinji Kempo is recognized as both a MA and Religion.

    Their is even a movie where Sony Chiba stars as Doshin So called Killing Machine. The movie is worse than the title by the way and the techniques are not well don’t in my humble opinion. But it is kind of funny and a nice story.
    Thats the American name for it. The actual name is SHORINJI KEMPO and he does portray DOSHIN SO. Also he did did Mas Oyama in 3 movies all very loosely based on actual events. I've actually met and trained with Oyama and I found the moves silly but fun and enjoyable in there on right. I've been a long time Sony Chiba fan. (I've even been TAKUMA TSURUGI for costume parties)


    Kunio Miyake out of ( I presume respect to distinctify his school and the fact that it is the culmination of his knowledge) calls his art "Kempo Aiki-Jujitsu". Sensei Miyake’s school is no frills and less marketing. Instead his skill speaks for itself I am sure to the detriment of his notoriety.
    I seriously doubt this for several reasons.
    "Kempo Aiki-Jujitsu" would sound odd.
    There has only been ONE art to use that term historically, Daito Ryu, and even that school is looked on with a skeptical eye because there isn't anything using the term IFIAK before Takeda.

    Well, this is a long answer to a short question. In my opinion though the martial arts field is rife with charlatans but Kunio Miyake is the real thing. I urge the original poster to not let what sounds like a bad experience with your friend sully the reputation of a really gifted teacher.
    So far we only have your word to go on and its not very convincing when looked upon with a knowledgeable eye.

    1. So Doshin was notorious for conducting his black belt tests in Yakuza bars. This is widely known and accepted. The Yakuza bosses thought it was a good test for their men as well.
    Uh NO. That is a fairy tale. Why? Let me tell you about so called "Yakuza bars." A Yakuza establishment can literally be anything. The yakuza is big and can take many forms. For instance you might have a member of a family who isn't the "gangster" type run a local establishment, like a restaurant, and the clientele will mainly be regular pple. Same with bars and even video game arcades. I know this because I worked at such a resturant and the arcade my brother and I used to frequent was frequented by yakuza. Also the dojo I trained Kyokushin at had yakuza members. Now for someone to cause trouble dilberatley at an establishment would be stupid because not only would the person gamble on the fact if there was yakuza even there in the first place they would risk pissing off pple that would come after them in mass until they feel they regained their honor.

    2. Dan Gable's students told me that it took him about two hours to warm up for a practice where he would actually participate but once warm he would wrestle a number of his more talented team members and win each match to show that he still could. In the same way on my best day I was not able to defeat the 50+ year old Sensei Miyake.
    Nice but doesn't say too much about the art. I know some 50+ pple who are badass. One of my BJJ/MMA trainers for one. Also when I was in France years ago I met a then 55yr old man during a wedding reception, he was the father of the bride who was marrying a french man. Almost everyone in attendance was a MArtist ins some form adn we turned the dinner into a impromptu MA demo/contest. After tossing pple around Mr Kondo came out and did the same. We matched up and we were at a deadlock. I was fit, strong, and competitive. He was a godan in Judo adn kept in shape. He was strong as hell and his technique was excellent.

    3. Karate was all the rage in the sixties, Kung-Fu seen as the ultimate authority in the Seventies, Kenpo a bit later. We have our own flavor of the month now but in the end the really effective techniques are very similar.

    Cheers, Matt
    Not completely true. There has been one art that has always been touted as an effective, practical form of SD for decades, and still used as the basis of programs for those who actually need to use such skills on a regular basis even now, and that was JUDO (still called JiuJitsu during the early parts of the centuray because a) it another form of Jujutsu and b)the terms were used interchangeable then) If you read old books and articles on SD during that time you will see that Judo is mentioned often. To paraphrase one person if you wanted to find a good Karate or KF school you first ask the Judo guys.
    What we have now is a RETURN. Brazillian Jiu Jitsu is the rage now because it reintroduce pple to effective methods of training much like Judo did before.
    ______
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    You can't practice Judo just to win a Judo Match! You practice so that no matter what happens, you can win using Judo!
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  6. Rock Ape is offline
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    Posted On:
    11/02/2008 10:13am

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    Hmm.. 5th dan in what style of iaido, that's the real question.

    Whilst I realise this is a posed image, there's a lot which can be gleaned from it. None of it tells me from my experiences that she's knows the arse end from her elbow about iai kihon.

    I'd like to see some video footage of her kihon waza.
    "To sin by silence when one should protest makes cowards out of men".

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  7. Matt_C is offline

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    Posted On:
    11/02/2008 2:08pm

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    She practices Eishin-Ryu iai-do. Not totally sure where she trained but I think there was some past affiliation or connection to Masayuki Shimabukuro since he also practices all three martial arts that she does and therefore is at least in the same circles.
    Shito-Ryu Karate-Do
    Eishin-Ryu Iaijutsu
    Shorinji Kempo
      #7
  8. Rock Ape is offline
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    Posted On:
    11/02/2008 2:48pm

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    By "Eishin Ryu" i'm presuming you mean Muso Jikiden Eishin Ryu ?

    I ask for clarification because I've studied Muso Shinden Ryu for quite a number of years and during that time I've trained in MJER with several senior people. Nothing in that picture remotely suggests skill sets associated with MJER however, as I recognise it is a still and obviously posed image but, I'm just perplexed why anyone senior or junior would adopt a pose/stance/position which isn't reflected in the system they study.
    "To sin by silence when one should protest makes cowards out of men".

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  9. TheOMGEffect is offline

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    Posted On:
    11/27/2008 4:22am

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    I found this thread via google and I'd have to say it is really freaking weird seeing random people posting pictures of my dojo on the internet as a thread topic. I wasn't training at that dojo when that picture was taken so I'm not in it but it's really weird since I know those people. Bertram Wong is the assistant Sensei at our dojo now while Akira Fukuda is the head sensei. Miyake-sensei moved from my curret dojo where Fukuda-sensei teaches to Texas about 4 years ago I think. So the dojo in the picture is not the dojo he teaches at anymore and it probably wasn't when the picture was taken either because they had a white mat back then.

    I don't know much but Miyake-sensei from what my sensei says is one of the worlds best at Karate and is pretty scary in Jujitsu and Iai-do.

    I don't personally train under Miyake-sensei. The closest I have come to that is saying hi to him at Karate Nationals and watching his kids for a little while, but I would still have to say your friend is a complete idiot. Point fighting is nowhere near real fighting and neither is MMA or LARPing. Not to say that they don't increase your odds of winning a street fight.

    Point fighting in Karate will probably get you pretty far in a street fight as long as it's no more than 1 or 2 people because the other guys pretty much have no idea what they are doing and if you are good at it, you can get a couple good punches in and hopefully they are wusses and will give up after being hit only once or twice. Judo point fighting is by all means useless unless you are really big or really damn good. Because a nice an easy counter to judo is getting punched in the face. Jujitsu is probably the best to go with but the problem is that it's so dangerous that you can't really practice it outside of regular uchikomi so there is some skill lag time but again people on the street are stupid so it will work anyway and you don't have to have as much skill in jujitsu as you do in judo and karate to win easily because jujitsu is meant for street fighting nowadays.

    MMA (UFC style) is a bunch of crap too and is about as effective as point fighting in Karate. If those fights weren't limited like they are, people would go down a lot faster, there would be a lot more injuries and possibly some deaths.


    Now, I'm not a black belt in Karate... yet, but off the top of my head I'm fairly sure that Karate hasn't been out for 1000+ years or even more than a few hundred. I'm not so sure about Jujitsu though that could be a little closer since samurai used it to assist their sword fighting while karate was developed to make up for the anti-sword laws in Japan that were put into act in more recent years than 1000 years ago. Judo hasn't even been out for 100 years, I'm sure of. So I would have to say your friend needs to learn to use his internets properly.



    Just as a big enlightenment, Those videos are advertisements meant to look cool. There is no sparing in them because they don't want new people to know that they can get hurt or hit in the face. It's stupid it advertise with sparing because if people see other people getting hit hard there is no way they are going to join.
    Last edited by Plasma; 12/15/2010 7:54pm at . Reason: Post Restored. Learn from your mistakes
      #9
  10. honesty is offline
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    Posted On:
    11/27/2008 4:39am


     Style: SAMBO

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    oh god oh god oh god oh god....
      #10
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